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Seeking Irish/Scottish reels for cellos


PhilipKT
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There is a tremendous amount of juvenile student fiddle music for cello duet, I am wondering if someone can recommend the same kind of thing on a slightly higher level in terms of quality and technique? I really enjoy it but I do get tired of the juvenilia, And several of my students are good enough to warrant more advanced stuff. So any suggestions would be welcome.

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A long shot may be Irish piano that has been transcribed for cello or cello duet.

I say that because I'm doing the same thing with Albeniz piano transcribed to guitar - what a mess. 

You did say more advanced so that's a suggestion - piano transcribed for cello.

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57 minutes ago, uncle duke said:

A long shot may be Irish piano that has been transcribed for cello or cello duet.

I say that because I'm doing the same thing with Albeniz piano transcribed to guitar - what a mess. 

You did say more advanced so that's a suggestion - piano transcribed for cello.

That’s a possibility, but lazy fellow that I am I’d rather have the work already done for meThat’s a possibility, but lazy fellow that I am I’d rather have the work already done for me

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46 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

That’s a possibility, but lazy fellow that I am I’d rather have the work already done for meThat’s a possibility, but lazy fellow that I am I’d rather have the work already done for me

If you were that lazy you wouldn't type a sentence twice ...

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On 7/21/2021 at 6:40 PM, PhilipKT said:

There is a tremendous amount of juvenile student fiddle music for cello duet, I am wondering if someone can recommend the same kind of thing on a slightly higher level in terms of quality and technique? I really enjoy it but I do get tired of the juvenilia, And several of my students are good enough to warrant more advanced stuff. So any suggestions would be welcome.

Irish/Scottish reels and the like don’t get “more advanced” because they are conceived to still work after the third etc. Beer

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The charm in many of these works is in the details. The flutter of a fine bagpiper's ring finger is often a joy and difficult to reproduce. The breaths of the flurry of long and short bows and the gasps of the retake make for a lot of fun when the tempi are not quick nor stable but frantic.

SO for cello and viola, the tenor banjo transcriptions have floated about read in treble clef, but in C.

The better tunes I have learned have been in bars nursing hand temperature beer as no one transcribes these pieces. Must sit through six rounds of unison melody making. I have sort of refused to write out the melodies as they seem sacred the way they are and learned. I worked with an south asian master and it was also without music, as it was a distraction to what was being taught. Certainly was a different type of mental workout. Mapping out long rhythmic and pitch patterns from memory was completely different from sight- reading. Hearing well played and enjoyed "learned" music is truly wonderful.

But style counts, so hearing the chimed hammer dulcimer and working in the thumping of the Bodhran to solo performance is challenging. A simple ditty played well is excellent.

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36 minutes ago, GoPractice said:

The charm in many of these works is in the details. The flutter of a fine bagpiper's ring finger is often a joy and difficult to reproduce. The breaths of the flurry of long and short bows and the gasps of the retake make for a lot of fun when the tempi are not quick nor stable but frantic.

SO for cello and viola, the tenor banjo transcriptions have floated about read in treble clef, but in C.

The better tunes I have learned have been in bars nursing hand temperature beer as no one transcribes these pieces. Must sit through six rounds of unison melody making. I have sort of refused to write out the melodies as they seem sacred the way they are and learned. I worked with an south asian master and it was also without music, as it was a distraction to what was being taught. Certainly was a different type of mental workout. Mapping out long rhythmic and pitch patterns from memory was completely different from sight- reading. Hearing well played and enjoyed "learned" music is truly wonderful.

But style counts, so hearing the chimed hammer dulcimer and working in the thumping of the Bodhran to solo performance is challenging. A simple ditty played well is excellent.

Yes exactly, and I would enjoy being able to do so

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For me traditional fiddle music is about swing and ornamentation. These can make a thing of wonder out of the simplest of tunes ...

The stave is just one possible point of departure.

But if you can't drag your students to a pub session, maybe try "Irish Folk Tunes for Cello" ...

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While there are probably a few more technically demanding pieces out there, most authentic tunes aren't that complex.  This is easy music to start playing.  It's designed to be pretty user friendly so anyone who can play a bit can potentially join in.  (And yes, maybe keep on playing after a few pints.)

So what do people who have got good do?  They don't go looking for "more advanced" tunes because they, by and large, don't exist.  Instead they embellish.  They ornament.  They move the ornaments around.  They play variations, both pre-planned and off the cuff.  

The secret to this music, for those who have been playing for a while, is that tunes can be as "advanced" as you want to make them.  

I would recommend you sit down with a nice tune or a set and work out what the musicians are doing in terms of variations and ornaments and either emulate them or use it as a jumping off point for your own version or arrangement.  

Maybe something like this: 

 

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On 7/23/2021 at 1:14 PM, uncle duke said:

I say that because I'm doing the same thing with Albeniz piano transcribed to guitar - what a mess. 

You did say more advanced so that's a suggestion - piano transcribed for cello.

Uncle… what works from Albeniz are you trying to transcribe? I may have it or the Guitar forum may have it already in their library.

Safari - Jul 28, 2021 at 9:36 AM.pdf

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It's me again!  

It doesn't get quite as wild as the baroque guys did, but maybe the best way to think of it is a bit like the follia/follies d'Espaigne/whatever you want to call it.  

Like that's a fantastically easy tune to play.  It's what, dd, dc#c#, c#dd, dee, eff, fee, edd, dc#c#  (or whatever key you want to put it in.)

Real suzuki book 1 territory.  

But have a look at I dunno farronel's version, or corelli's version, or vivaldi's, or marais'.

Now that's rather more developed than anyone normally goes with a trad tune, but it's a similar principle. You keep playing the tune, and it should stay obviously recognisable to anyone listening, and you mess around with it in different ways each time it comes around.   It's not the tune, it's what you do with it.   

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40 minutes ago, PaganiniGuitar said:

Uncle… what works from Albeniz are you trying to transcribe?

Jeffrey, a moderator here, doesn't care to have me speak of guitar on Maestronet.  He says it detracts from future Julliard violinists' endeavours.  I'll see if I can sneak this one past him.

Pg. 4 Rumores de la Caleta.  It's already been transcribed and more than likely altered by others over the years.  I'm thinking wrong time signature - 3/8 and I'm feeling more notes added to make a 4/4 piece would be better but may detract from the Spanish sound.

I have the feeling pg. 4 was transcribed around the first two measures of line 4 of pg. 4 - those do need to be a 3/8 time signature speaking - appears to me those notes borrowed from Barrios Capricho Espanol. 

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47 minutes ago, uncle duke said:

Jeffrey, a moderator here, doesn't care to have me speak of guitar on Maestronet.  He says it detracts from future Julliard violinists' endeavours.  I'll see if I can sneak this one past him.

Pg. 4 Rumores de la Caleta.  It's already been transcribed and more than likely altered by others over the years.  I'm thinking wrong time signature - 3/8 and I'm feeling more notes added to make a 4/4 piece would be better but may detract from the Spanish sound.

I have the feeling pg. 4 was transcribed around the first two measures of line 4 of pg. 4 - those do need to be a 3/8 time signature speaking - appears to me those notes borrowed from Barrios Capricho Espanol. 

Jeffrey has a point but no reason one can’t post one or two replies about sheet music. I mean this forum has a keyboard section right.

Yes you are right about the time signatures and can vary from transriptions. I play Tarrega’s transcription of Carnival of Venice by Paganini and can tell you there are many versions out there but find the true variation is Tarrega’s. I can PM the sheet for Albeniz and see if this is one you have already look at.

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