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Are Americans running out of fiddles?


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19 minutes ago, Delabo said:

Its hard to believe that anyone would be fooled by it.

And yet they are.
Plenty of people have seen a Markneukirchen violin, and not known what it actually was, some even thinking they have an Italian in their hands.
Posts like this are cropping up on M'net very regularly.

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On 7/17/2021 at 11:21 AM, mood2000 said:

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9 minutes ago, Delabo said:

Surely you meant very poorly executed screwdriver ageing ? Its hard to believe that anyone would be fooled by it.

And anyway, why do these bodgers think that an old violin is going to be covered in that sort of abuse ?

I have just looked at my 1820 violin and it has very few marks on it even though it has obviously been well used during its long life. Thats why  violins come with cases.

 

 

“Screwdriver ageing” is just my, somewhat tongue-in-cheek expression for the illustrated “wear patten” (illustrated above). The inherent sarcasm of the phrase indicating “poorly executed” in and of itself. I believe I may coin such a phrase, since others develop Maestronetspeak such as “Markie” with impunity. With screwdriver ageing I mean when it has been roughed up with a blunt instrument, often in places that would never have such damage naturally, to feign the impression for gullible people that it older than one might expect. Should one look critically, this is far more widespread than one might expect.

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In former times I used for myself the term Kugelschreiberbehandlung (ball pen treatment) for this kind of antiquing, because it looks as if a child had attacked the instrument with such a tool. But because the invention of the ball pen is younger than most of these instruments the denomination with screwdriver is definitely more accurate.

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2 hours ago, Delabo said:

Thats why  violins come with cases.

I think that the old wooden "coffin" cases caused much of the actual wear that we see on old violins. They weren't well padded nor did they hold violins very snuggly. So the violins rattled and scrapped around inside of them.

Plus, I assume that the wooden cases were made from cheap wood and were a source of wood worms that simply moved from the case to the violin.

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4 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

 

856513013_screwdriverantiquing.thumb.jpg.e68e422ec11ad72b7b47e6bbcc40189d.jpg

Vuillaume, for example, although there are hundreds of others.

Well I should’ve clarified my question, any fool can bang on a Violin in the white before varnishing it, I’m talking about antiquing that is really effectively done. I know it’s done all the time now, I can even go to the violin shop and choose my cello “antiqued” or “not antiqued” like I’m buying a hamburger with or without cheese.

But was it common among the old guys? I guess Vuilluame did it, And I’m assuming he did it well,But I mean like the old old guys?

 

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15 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

I think that the old wooden "coffin" cases caused much of the actual wear that we see on old violins. They weren't well padded nor did they hold violins very snuggly. So the violins rattled and scrapped around inside of them.

Plus, I assume that the wooden cases were made from cheap wood and were a source of wood worms that simply moved from the case to the violin.

I can concur with some of what you say. I have an old violin that has a problem with the case that  causes the violin edge to be knocked every time it is removed if a person is clumsy in removing it. But I am very careful how I take the violin out and have avoided any further damage. And I am quite sure that you also would have been a very careful previous owner if it had been your violin. I can understand what you are saying if the violin was cheap, people can be careless with cheap junk, but I would expect that someone who bought an expensive violin would know how to look after it at all times.

 

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22 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

At least this dutzenarbeit has a vague resemblance to something Klotz, instead of the much more common "Strad" model with the Klotz stamp under the button.

It does not resemble any Klotz in any respect

You should read the essays on the subject you can click on here

The history of violin making in Mittenwald (geigenbaumuseum-mittenwald.de)

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/15/2021 at 12:04 AM, Wood Butcher said:

I'm surprised that you think they can't get up to the $1800 they hope for...

This is clearly the super deluxe model, as can be seen by the generous amount of extra screwdriver antiquing, particularly evident on the back. I'd wager they even used a new screwdriver, box fresh, as it dug and gouged into the virgin varnish, leaving a scene of devastation in its wake.

This extra effort with the screwdriver, would in their view, seem to negate the devaluation caused by the broken out neck, which has been put back in a half arsed fashion, and lack of an ebony fingerboard.

Incredulously, some 6 intellectually challenged individuals have staged a bidding war for our cherished screwdriver Dutzendarbeit. The “winner” who’s highest bid of $2.100 plus commission will leave him, her, or it paying $2.520 + expenses, surely puts an end to any rhetoric, that the T2 sales are “for the Trade”. Should “adsfre” read Maestronet, they may feel free to come around to Klosterneuburg, so that I can take the piss

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It's like it was written in the stars.

You really need to send that dustbin(s) off to an auction, after filling it for all those years. Now is the time that trash can become gold across the pond!

Of course, we could have it all wrong. In another part of the world, a lowly Dutz could be seen as special and exotic. That screwdriver antiquing was hand applied after all :D

I wonder how much the button graft, neck reset & an ebony fingerboard will cost the "lucky" winner tumbleweed.gif.457054ea9587c48066676699ba181a56.gif

 

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4 minutes ago, Rue said:

Even in German?  Müll?

Absolutely! After all would you rather have a fine old violin made in the historic town of Markneukirchen, Or the exact same violin made in the “historic town of Fort Worth…home of the stockyards!”

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8 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Yeah, strange. I wonder what it will be tomorrow

Now it shows just the one bid.  Maybe somebody was reading this and withdrew their bid! :lol: I've bid on things in the past that I didn't win, only to have the auction house offer it to me after the auction ended because the winner backed out for some reason.  

 

 

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