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Eyebrow injury


jacobsaunders
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7 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Amongst other things, I currently have an Anton Thir, Pressburg with an elegant pear wood lions head on my bench at the moment. Unfortunately the poor thing has had a skirmish with someone in the past, at the cost of part of his eyebrow. I am at a bit of a loss, wondering how to replace his eyebrow, without risking making things worse than they are already, or should I just leave him as walking wounded? Does anyone have any bright ideas?

 

 

 Really,jacobsaunders?

BeHeaded is what any sane violinmaker should do and that is the fact.

 

 

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3 hours ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

Why is chalk fitting out of the question?  Is the eyebrow too small?  

I'm curious why this isn't just a more precise version of a scroll eye graft, like Hahn's Vuillaume had a few years ago, but everyone but Evan seems to have doubts about it.  :)

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Pirate masquerade is from the 60s. :DBe more modern: Gucci sunglasses, James Bond style. <_<

But jokes aside I would do it with wood filler too, because if anything goes wrong you end more or less where you started. I would probably do it with a mixture of Lycopodium and 2 component glue . This allows to set the mixture on the surface as it is. (And in the unlikely case it should fall off later there won't be any traces from 'over-restoration'. :ph34r:)

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3 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

Could you be more specific?  Do you mean epoxy?  Any particular type or brand?

Sorry about my japanized English. Yes, epoxy. I suppose you won’t be able to find the epoxy brands I am using here in Japan.

However, because the epoxy doesn’t need to hold anything, almost any brand should do it. For the eyebrow of the lion head I would maybe add a little of pigments to the mixture to get closer to the color.

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I think that the most sensible thing to do is build up a new eyebrow without removing any wood. I would probably mix some wood dust with a "dark wood glue"  to get a thickness that won't sag, and build the new brow. Since it hardens slowly, you have a some time to adjust the shape.

Franklin 3704 Titebond II Dark Wood Glue

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9 hours ago, Violadamore said:

I'm curious why this isn't just a more precise version of a scroll eye graft, like Hahn's Vuillaume had a few years ago, but everyone but Evan seems to have doubts about it.  :)

A “scroll eye graft” is a fairly routine job, and not difficult. One has enough in ones left had to hold it, without dropping it on the floor, also enough material to apply a cramp and one can carve it like the opposite side, without having to worry about any facial expression. I even posted one here

 

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1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

A “scroll eye graft” is a fairly routine job, and not difficult. One has enough in ones left had to hold it, without dropping it on the floor, also enough material to apply a cramp and one can carve it like the opposite side, without having to worry about any facial expression. I even posted one here

 

Ahhhh, thanks much for posting that, Jacob.  :)

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11 minutes ago, Deo Lawson said:

I'd just flatten the existing surface so I could glue on a new piece of wood, and carefully shape it post-gluing.

For some reason this is taboo.  IMHO it's a lot better to remove 0.1 mm of original wood than to repair with a substance that isn't even wood.  Maybe it will all make sense to me after 30 years in the profession?  I dunno.  I hope that anyone repairing my fiddles after I'm dead would not feel so obligated to preserve the tiniest bit of my original work.  But I'm not Anton Thir.  :unsure:

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22 minutes ago, Deo Lawson said:

I'd just flatten the existing surface so I could glue on a new piece of wood, and carefully shape it post-gluing.

The trouble with that approach is that, should one be unsuccessful, which is easy to imagine, and should one have to go back to square one, one is worse off, than when one started

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IMO it's a bit similar to a chipped off scroll chamfer where it's usually possible to adjust a small piece of matching wood to a given unregular surface without chalk nor taking away anything from the original substance (beside cleaning it from dirt and other residues). Maybe one needs to do it in more than one step with several very small pieces, like I wrote with the help of a needle. The fine shaping would be done after glueing with a small gouge.

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I would get ahold of some "woodwise" Australian wood filler which can act like wood bondo. I would then gently clean the area , final cleanse with just water, very little.

Then I would tint the woodwise to be more black/brown.but not too dark, walnut color would be fine if you can find it. I would then apply a dab on the eyebrow and try to reform it, then while the woodwise is dry damp, I would reshape it more precisely using stiff brushes, trying to avoid any dry shaping as once dry the woodwise is rather rock hard and hard to shape, but can be re-softend with water as well as remove haze and thin areas to be removed that may be excess.

Once you get it right it can be sealed, color matched with diluted artist paint and then top coated., and dulled with pumice if needed.

Evans way is very doable also but requires more skill , whereas my way is basically a tiny wood bondo job.

The great thing with woodwise is that as long as it has not be sealed it can be removed with just water and patience, and once cleaned would look basically as it does now, and or you can screw up and try again if you need to,

I love and hate these sort of things in that I can spend hours doing them, often on wood work or furniture , and get them pretty perfect , only to have it really be me that looks at these things too hard. So many hours fixing tiny spots on floors that people just walk right over and don't care about.

The color and sheen of the head certainly helps, I'm just amazed he has his tongue still

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Stick-on eyebrows. They come in pairs. Stick one on each side for a match, or use one for the missing eyebrow on the fiddle, and wear the other yourself when you're out and about. :)

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mustaches-Self-Adhesive-Novelty-Fake-Eyebrows-False-Facial-Hair-Costume-Accessory-for-Adults-Black-with-Gray-Color/631859103

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If it be determined to use some form of flexible substrate to form this out of.

It would be necessary to build a dam out of wax or such, as the underside is also carefully shaped and a glob of uneven junk around the eye would look extremely tacky.

The underside would need to be filled up and formed into shape so the transition from the underside above the eye remains smooth.

 With Wax.

Think like a woman's breast filling a bra, you build the bra then fill it with your acumpucky slop,, let it dry then remove the bra after it has hardened. Leave a bit of excess to blend in at the top.

Form it with clay modeling tools.

I'd glue on a piece without disturbing anything, and barely knocking off the highest spots at the glue joint,,

Thousand ways to skin a cat, just make sure he's dead first.

Really not a big deal.

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6 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Stick-on eyebrows. They come in pairs. Stick one on each side for a match, or use one for the missing eyebrow on the fiddle, and wear the other yourself when you're out and about. :)

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mustaches-Self-Adhesive-Novelty-Fake-Eyebrows-False-Facial-Hair-Costume-Accessory-for-Adults-Black-with-Gray-Color/631859103

 

Nice David,,,

Nice.

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When I served as an apprentice in Hills* we regularly encountered this sort of problem. Eventually we developed a technique where we would carefully remove a lock of hair from the back of the lion's head and then graft it on to the eyebrow location. Rub the back of the scroll round the bottom of the communal ashtray and the job is good. Often the lion would end up with a slightly quizzical expression, which many people found strangely appropriate.

(* the hills) 

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