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Unknown silver-mounted violin bow


Alexander James Stew

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4 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Looking at the rounded throat of the frog and its slightly upward slant I was thinking Paul Richard Herberlein? Any opinions on that?

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6 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

Any ideas on this bow anyone. The frog is pinned inside...no screws.Many thanks

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/jbwQ39DiefcxgTAN9

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

Looking at the rounded throat of the frog and its slightly upward slant I was thinking Paul Richard Herberlein? Any opinions on that?

 

5 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

The screw has no pins. The inside of the frog has two pins and not screws. Nice ebony in the frog and the head has a certain poise and sweeping elegance. I have seen the 2 silver linings In the frog holding the mother of pearl, but I have not seen silver linings with a solid silver under-side to the frog .

All these are pretty common Markneukirchen standards. As it was well explained to you several times it's nearly impossible to drop a name on it, maybe except randomly if you're paying 400 quid.

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5 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Have these pictures been posted in some non standard way? I am getting to something asking for my Google password when I tap the link for the pictures.

Big Brother (Google) watches you and wants to know who browses their web :-)

That should be safe, but I personally never follow these links.

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42 minutes ago, Blank face said:

 

 

All these are pretty common Markneukirchen standards. As it was well explained to you several times it's nearly impossible to drop a name on it, maybe except randomly if you're paying 400 quid.

So this is a standard Markneukirchen frog? I confess I have never seen the underside of the frog in this format with the 2 silver strips and solid silver( substituiting the mother of pearl) in the middle...

IMG_20210622_194026.jpg

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These are common Markneukirchen head and frog shapes from roughly the between the wars period, like I said before, and there were dozens of shops producing them, often in division of labour by specialist shops for frog blanks and sticks. So more than "nice silver mounted Markneukirchen bow" shouldn't be expected realistically.

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1 hour ago, Blank face said:

I can assure you that I've seen very many of them and usually at rather average shop (trade) bows.

Me too. 


In fact I have an identical frog on a nice branded Gustav Prager, so I further suspect that many of these makers didn’t bother to make their own frogs.

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1 hour ago, martin swan said:

I further suspect that many of these makers didn’t bother to make their own frogs.

And the sticks neither, as we learned from records that Meinel supplied the Nürnberger shop with sticks.

Personally more than the frog I like the head, which features a neat model close to some Pfretzschner bows. But it would be a stretch to ascribe it to these shop or a particular coworker (like Heberlein) without more supporting evidence, there were too many of them.

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I think the OP's bow is nice, and Pfretzschner-like, as Blank face mentioned, but not as crisp as a genuine Pfretzschner.

Just because a bow doesn't have a stamp, a discernible maker, a certificate (:)), or cost a pretty penny doesn't mean it can't be attractive and very good player. There were clearly some very good anonymous archetiers making very good bows (and parts of bows), and because they are "trade bows" they are very affordable.

@Alexander James Stew, do you use this bow? Does it play well?

 

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8 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

I think the OP's bow is nice, and Pfretzschner-like, as Blank face mentioned, but not as crisp as a genuine Pfretzschner.

Just because a bow doesn't have a stamp, a discernible maker, a certificate (:)), or cost a pretty penny doesn't mean it can't be attractive and very good player. There were clearly some very good anonymous archetiers making very good bows (and parts of bows), and because they are "trade bows" they are very affordable.

@Alexander James Stew, do you use this bow? Does it play well?

 

Dear George,

It actually plays very well and a lovely balance in the hand. Very easy to do mixed bowings....

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I have a question about the value of bows like this.

They are complete and well made of good materials, basically the 1900s marketplace equivalent of today’s silver mounted Marco Raposo and Arcos Brazil bows.

Most that I have seen feel and play better than the typical low end Arcos Brazil bows, which are Nickel mounted(also better than the step-up silver mounted Arcos Brazil bows.)

Given good condition, wouldn’t these anonymous bows be worth more than their modern equivalents?

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