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Jan Basta Violin Maker Prague


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3 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

Actually the most expensive in his range....Give me a violin like this with good wood, age and decently made any day over modern Chinese instruments in a similar price bracket.

I've read somewhere Basta existed and had a violin shop, but probably he was just a seller. I sold at least 3 of those his "best" violin with better "golden" varnish and better woods. But it is still a Schoenbach (later Luby) trade violin. Decently made? No, far from being decent. Chinese violins? sorry, even worse than Schoenbach, sure. 

I am sure it is same with all Schoenbach dealers, some of them were makers, but majority we know ("bigger names :D ) were sellers only. Only once I found a Johann Schack signature inside on table stating he made it , and that was really much better made violin (but still recognisable as Shoenbach)  , rest majority of violins with his (shop) labels I have seen was probably just finished by him in a best case. 

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56 minutes ago, mathieu valde said:

I've read somewhere Basta existed and had a violin shop, but probably he was just a seller. I sold at least 3 of those his "best" violin with better "golden" varnish and better woods. But it is still a Schoenbach (later Luby) trade violin. Decently made? No, far from being decent. Chinese violins? sorry, even worse than Schoenbach, sure. 

I am sure it is same with all Schoenbach dealers, some of them were makers, but majority we know ("bigger names :D ) were sellers only. Only once I found a Johann Schack signature inside on table stating he made it , and that was really much better made violin (but still recognisable as Shoenbach)  , rest majority of violins with his (shop) labels I have seen was probably just finished by him in a best case. 

Many thanks Mathieu for your input...much appreciated.

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1 hour ago, mathieu valde said:

But it is still a Schoenbach (later Luby) trade violin. Decently made? No, far from being decent. Chinese violins? sorry, even worse than Schoenbach, sure.

And something not a whit different in intent or quality, but cobbled together under the auspices of Monzino in Italy, is suddenly "fine", and offered at 10-20 times as much (or if produced in Mirecourt, which you didn't mention, twice or three times as much)?   The practice may be legal and even "respectable", but rationally and morally defensible?  Hardly.

Quite a few excellent violins have also come from all centers of trade production, and should not be overlooked.

                partytime.gif.086b393f8093bcefad55423b8d187d79.gif    

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3 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

Jochum Schmidt saw the bow and said it was by J W KNOPF.Its a lovely bow, but too light for my own personal taste 55g

It would be interesting to know if he just said it or put it into writing?

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2 minutes ago, Alexander James Stew said:

No, I can get a certificate anytime I want... Never been to Dresden so when things calm down a little with this Covid business I will go and do this

It will cost you €400, and you will still have a bow that you don’t like (to light)

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23 minutes ago, Alexander James Stew said:

No, I can get a certificate anytime I want... Never been to Dresden so when things calm down a little with this Covid business I will go and do this

Just wondering, because such a long and stubby nose isn’t what the heads by JW Knopf are known for. More what the early Nürnberger shop and it’s followers made. But I surely don’t know all what his shop could have produced.

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

It will cost you €400, and you will still have a bow that you don’t like (to light)

Very true Jacob....food for thought

 

2 hours ago, Blank face said:

It would be interesting to know if he just said it or put it into writing?

 

2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

It will cost you €400, and you will still have a bow that you don’t like (to light)

 

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12 minutes ago, Alexander James Stew said:

It might still be worth getting s certificate....the bow is not " my cup of tea" but maybe for light barroque playing could be perfect...it's only 55.5g. Somebody is sure to like it.

I told you what I thought of that here:

but you needn't take any notice of me

 

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4 hours ago, Blank face said:

Just wondering, because such a long and stubby nose isn’t what the heads by JW Knopf are known for. More what the early Nürnberger shop and it’s followers made. But I surely don’t know all what his shop could have produced.

I was thinking the same thing regarding the stubby upturned nose. It does not look like Knopf-like to me. From @Brad Dorsey:

On 2/22/2004 at 8:34 PM, Brad Dorsey said:

According to the Grunke book, Wilhelm Hermann Hammig was born in 1838 and worked in Berlin and Markneukirchen. In 1875, he moved to Leipzig. "The bows that he sold in his Leipzig shop bear the stamp W.H.HAMMIG LEIPZIG." The shop opened a branch in Berlin in 1894. "We assume that the bows sold in the Berlin shop in the first half of the 20th century were stamped W.H.HAMMIG." He died in 1925, but the shop continued operating until 1956. He was a violin maker, not a bowmaker. Bows for the shop were made by Christian Suss, Albin Nurnberger-Suss and the Albert Nurnberger workshop.

 

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3 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

It might still be worth getting s certificate....the bow is not " my cup of tea" but maybe for light barroque playing could be perfect...it's only 55.5g. Somebody is sure to like it.

For baroque playing one would be much better served by a bow made in the style of 16-17the century bows. 

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36 minutes ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

I may be talking through my hat, but aren't lighter bows sometimes suited to particular instruments/strings?  Not so much the style of playing

Sorry, misread that. Not so much style of playing, I agree. More the fiddle and the player than anything else.

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41 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Yes it was, thank you.

Title still needs some more adjusting, as Basta was not a maker, or the maker of this violin.

Well I can't really change the wording of peoples posts, that is an intervention too far. Unless it's someway offensive or there is a word spelt incorrectly. I'm terrible at spelling myself, but I do like to correct the big ones in titles.

I'm sure many people will be drawn to this thread via this title when they find similar violins they are investigating. Hopefully if they take the time to read through the informative posts then they will start to get an understanding of the situation.

:wub:   Much love to all!

 

 

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9 hours ago, Alexander James Stew said:

but maybe for light barroque playing could be perfect...it's only 55.5g.

 

5 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

For baroque playing one would be much better served by a bow made in the style of 16-17the century bows. 

Sure, but for " light  barroque playing" maybe not  :D

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Back to " Jan Basta" ....(sorry I veered off course posting a couple of photos of a very nice ".... according to Jochum Schmidt" J W KNOPF bow) Very nice if somewhat too light for my taste. And agreed, the weight, balance,adherence to the string,player's taste and bow technique are all determining factors in whether " we like playing with the bow"

I do think " JAN BASTA" is representative of finding a particular type of Bohemian fiddle with some years that on it that sometimes can sound surprisingly pretty decent for a couple of thousand euros. Taking into consideration the quality and age of the wood as well as reasonable thicknessing, the chances that if it sounds now it won't change. There are a lot of lesser expensive modern instruments out there that are simply too thin. They sound now but are eligible to collapse in a fairly short space of time.

 

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20 minutes ago, Alexander James Stew said:

I do think " JAN BASTA" is representative of finding a particular type of Bohemian fiddle with some years that on it that sometimes can sound surprisingly pretty decent for a couple of thousand euros.

If you mean couple as "not more than two" I could agree; as retail for a much nicer example than you posted above. The average would be more in the hundreds.

Probably most people have experienced to make a lucky find one or maybe two at an auction, Ebay included; but also that such an inccident isn't repeatable as often as one might wish to. Beside that rare luck I'm usually satisfied to pay exactly what it is worth for some restorable stuff. That's rare and time consuming enough.

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16 minutes ago, Blank face said:

If you mean couple as "not more than two" I could agree; as retail for a much nicer example than you posted above. The average would be more in the hundreds.

Probably most people have experienced to make a lucky find one or maybe two at an auction, Ebay included; but also that such an inccident isn't repeatable as often as one might wish to. Beside that rare luck I'm usually satisfied to pay exactly what it is worth for some restorable stuff. That's rare and time consuming enough.

Wise words indeed.  Many thanks for your remarks.

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Just a note on the Jalovec books, Jalovec is no longer considered an authority on much of anything, turned out he merely copied information from Lutgendorf, another writer who gets things wrong as often as not. One of the biggest mistakes they make is confusing Violin dealers (who simply bought, marketed and labeled trade violins) with being actual makers having some direct hand in production. I think Jan Basta may have been another one of these dealers, though I can't speak with authority, the fact that there are so many of them and that they come in many different levels from cheap to quite decent, seems to indicate he was buying finished dutzenarbeit of different levels and fitting them all with his label, which was then marketed in multiple countries.

So I would think Jan Basta was more of a businessman than an actual maker running a factory, something they didn't really have in 1900 in Schoenbach.

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