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Cello, Mario Gadda workshop


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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

You should ask someone who speaks fluent Italian (i.e. not me), what it means when Mr. Gadda certifies that a cello, labelled and stamped Mario Gadda, is “School of Gadda”

I don't see that - he says he made the cello, that it's entirely made by him, based on a personal model of his father's but modified slightly in the middle bouts.

I would guess that auction houses feel that Mario Gadda instruments are a bit of a minefield, and that "workshop of" is a safer description than "by" ...

From a legal point of view a certificate presented in this way acts indirectly as a guarantee from the auction house, since if the certificate isn't original and belongs to the cello, the cello is de facto a "fake".

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36 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

It is gratifying to see how many Maestronetters speak fluent Italian, I had thought Martin was more familiar with Serbo-Croat. Curious that the auction house don’t believe him:)

French is my main language but I get by in German and Italian - my Croatian doesn't stretch much beyond alcohol and building materials.

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45 minutes ago, martin swan said:

French is my main language but I get by in German and Italian - my Croatian doesn't stretch much beyond alcohol and building materials.

Your English appears pretty good as well.

There is a downside in being born into a country of 350 million people who all speak the same language

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11 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

There is a downside in being born into a country of 350 million people who all speak the same language

I don't think they all are speaking German. :) Lot of Spanish speakers, too, not to mention Mandarin.

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My daughter likes languages. It started with German (she practiced on me), then she switched to Spanish and became fairly proficient (spent a summer in Mexico). Then she switched to Farsi and is becoming conversant. Now she's been deployed with a mostly French speaking staff. ^_^ Her French is worse than mine (and mine is bad).

In the meantime I have volunteered to help with an ESL employee of my husband's.

Learning/teaching a second language is challenging.

I dare you to explain exactly what a door is...to someone with a limited vocabulary. :D

Hats off to all the MN polyglots. :)

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I think it's more rewarding to learn extra languages in Europe (and area) where you can actually use them.

Despite having two official languages I have never needed to use any French. I did give it a go in Belgium though.^_^

I occasionally speak a wee bit of German - when I overhear others speaking German. However, using eavesdropping as a language opportunity is very limiting. <_<

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Thanks for the comments and the translations. Personally I can get by in French but my Italian is limited to ordering food and drink. I also speak a little Russian which gets novelty points but is rarely of any use. 

 

As for the cello, it sounds like it might be worth looking at and playing. Of course if someone thinks it's worth much more than the estimate they are welcome to  it.

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2 hours ago, Blank face said:

I don't think they all are speaking German. :) Lot of Spanish speakers, too, not to mention Mandarin.

Oh, everyone in the US speaks English. And of course every first or second generation immigrant also speaks something else. But it’s sad that there’s no incentive to learn an additional language, like there is in Europe, where driving for an hour or so brings you to an entirely different language. 
my German was pretty good once but no place to use it so it’s fallen away. Traurig..

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50 minutes ago, Brumcello said:

Thanks for the comments and the translations. Personally I can get by in French but my Italian is limited to ordering food and drink. I also speak a little Russian which gets novelty points but is rarely of any use. 

 

As for the cello, it sounds like it might be worth looking at and playing. Of course if someone thinks it's worth much more than the estimate they are welcome to  it.

I guess we’re back to cellos now, I would highly recommend you do a Google search for the retail value of instruments by that maker. There’s a lot of mystery and possible shenanigans regarding Gadda instruments, plus there are a whole lot of them. 

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I speak American English, and am fluent in a sub-set of American English called Appalachian English, which may, or may not, actually be closer to English than American English.

 

As for the cello, at that price you can't lose much so long as you are purchasing to play rather than sell, but I agree with Manfio: This is going to some part of Asia, and will be a Gadda there. At least to the next couple of owners.

 

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24 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

I guess we’re back to cellos now, I would highly recommend you do a Google search for the retail value of instruments by that maker. There’s a lot of mystery and possible shenanigans regarding Gadda instruments, plus there are a whole lot of them. 

Thanks, I've already started and am aware of the fact that a Gadda may not be a Gadda. I have also seen a huge variation in prices.  My gut feeling is that it will sell for a lot more than I am willing to pay. 

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

A matter of opinion:)

You could do a lot worse than look up Mark Twain’s wonderful essay called “The Awful German language” which is specifically about the awful German language, but peripherally about how easy English is… Except English English, which always uses too many letters.

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2 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

You could do a lot worse than look up Mark Twain’s wonderful essay called “The Awful German language” which is specifically about the awful German language, but peripherally about how easy English is… Except English English, which always uses too many letters.

The things that are easy about English are pretty difficult for people trying to learn the language. At least with German there are clear rules and you know where you stand - in English everything is irregular, and the composite verbs are a nightmare.

how do you explain to get over, the get round, to get along, to get it, to give in, to give up, to give out, etc etc .... to be done in, done out, done up, done over, done with ay ay ay!

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14 minutes ago, martin swan said:

Re the cello it looks fine to me - it's just slightly illogical that anyone would get excited about a Gadda purely and simply because it was made in Italy.

It's not the Italian manufacture that interests me. I think modern instruments by good makers represent excellent value. I suspect the cello will sell for quite a high price, largely because it is Italian. But,if the cello plays well,is nicely made and goes for the estimate that strikes me as a worthwhile purchase. 

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2 hours ago, martin swan said:

The things that are easy about English are pretty difficult for people trying to learn the language. At least with German there are clear rules and you know where you stand - in English everything is irregular, and the composite verbs are a nightmare.

how do you explain to get over, the get round, to get along, to get it, to give in, to give up, to give out, etc etc .... to be done in, done out, done up, done over, done with ay ay ay!

One of the funniest lines in Twain’s essay is” it is a source of despair for the student when he reads the instruction,’... the student will please make note of the following exceptions to the rule,’ and, looking at the list, finds more exceptions to the rule than instances of it!”

And more Twain:

His short story “the celebrated jumping frog of Caleveras county” was translated into French by someone who attempted-disastrously, it seems-to effectively translate the American slang and idioms into French. Twain knew French and was so amazed by the attempted translation that he translated it, word for word, back into English, and republished it along with the original version, and added commentary.

It is amazing how funny it is even for someone who doesn’t speak a word of French. Because you know both French and English, I would highly recommend you look it up. Let me know what you think.

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2 hours ago, martin swan said:

The things that are easy about English are pretty difficult for people trying to learn the language. At least with German there are clear rules and you know where you stand - in English everything is irregular, and the composite verbs are a nightmare.

how do you explain to get over, the get round, to get along, to get it, to give in, to give up, to give out, etc etc .... to be done in, done out, done up, done over, done with ay ay ay!

PS in English there’s only one way to say “the.” In German, there are 24...ways to say “the.”

OY!

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