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The Resounding Fingerboard


Rue
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1 hour ago, Rue said:

How does this work? I understand what they're trying to say, but don't quite get it.

https://resoundstrings.com/pages/resoundingfingerboard

Then I thought it might be fun to check one out...until I saw the price. €135. :mellow:

So...no experimenting from my end! ^_^

Do they offer a package deal with The Blasphemy Bar:lol:

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2 hours ago, Rue said:

How does this work? I understand what they're trying to say, but don't quite get it.

What are they trying to say? That you can improve technique without the inconvenience of having to pracice?

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I remain puzzled.

I don't quite get how the tactile component helps...and I don't get how they can charge that much for a bit of silicone (or whatever that is).

I read (I think) that it's handcrafted?

Regardless...someone, somewhere, thought it was of enough value to market (at what seems like an exhorbitant fee).

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1 hour ago, Rue said:

There's a brochure?  That they're charging for?  I missed that!

The brochure includes a list of exercises. I think the aim is not to eliminate practice, per se, but to be able to learn absent a teacher.

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the only benefit I can see is for practicing vibrato, as an assist in keeping the finger tip in one place on the board while developing flexibility in the tip joint of the finger.  but that can be achieved in other simple ways.  One thing that worked for me was to roll up a small piece of masking tape on the tip of my finger, just for a few minutes of vibrato practice daily, until the tip joints learned some flexibility.

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I am just a very unflexable person - genetically. No contortionists or gymnasts in the family. Although adequate, my vibrato is very small/limited. So I would be interested in a little experimentation. If this is a miracle device, stands to reason that I might improve...even if I'm old and set in my ways.

However...I'm also old and frugal and adverse to gambling...

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I often thought electro-shock could be a good learning tool to discourage less than perfect technique. After experiencing a few corrective jolts, the novice would quickly learn not to repeat the same errors.:blink:

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1 hour ago, Bill Yacey said:

I often thought electro-shock could be a good learning tool to discourage less than perfect technique. After experiencing a few corrective jolts, the novice would quickly learn not to repeat the same errors.:blink:

Yes we could set it up like a Milgrim experiment, where if you mess up too much it's maximum voltage time, "they'll never make that mistake again!" "the experiment requires that you continue" :lol::o:huh::mellow: 

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On 5/27/2021 at 10:16 AM, Rue said:

I am just a very unflexable person - genetically. No contortionists or gymnasts in the family. Although adequate, my vibrato is very small/limited. So I would be interested in a little experimentation. If this is a miracle device, stands to reason that I might improve...even if I'm old and set in my ways.

However...I'm also old and frugal and adverse to gambling...

Just how long did it take you to learn vibrato?  It took me a full two years*, studying with an excellent teacher, focusing almost exclusively on vibrato.  During that time, I did daily exercises to loosen up my hand and force a "soupy" sounding vibrato.  This had to become muscle memory before I was able to learn to adjust the speed and depth in a tasteful way.  Nothing came easily, and I doubt I would have had much success without this process.  I have always been pretty stiff, and I was so sure I couldn't do it.  Vibrato is now one of the strongest elements of my playing.  I know lots and lots of players who have a tight vibrato, and not one of them has put in the work I have.  I also know a lot of players who have a nice sounding wide vibrato, but they cannot vary it for the same reason.  

I am no phenomenal player, but I know my vibrato cold.  I do not think that there are any shortcuts to doing good vibrato.  

I do not know you personally, so it may well be a physical problem.  Forgive me if this comment comes across as disrespectful or internet grandstanding.  My trills are shite, always have been, never bothered to learn.  I can't play 5ths.  So no, I don't think I'm Menuhin or something.  Just giving my thoughts on an area of violin playing where I [think I] have something useful to add.  

*I am a very slow learner when it comes to physical movements.  I have also never practiced terribly seriously, as my musical ambitions are not terribly high.  I expect a diligent student could master vibrato with greater celerity than I did.  

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I didn't take note of how long...just that it took a long time (over years) with intermittent focus.

I'm not a fan of excessive large vibrato, so that didn't bother me, I just wish I had a bit more variety/control in what I can manage.

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