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opinion on a bow


Jul
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I am still looking for a new bow for my daughter.

This one will be for sale soon (in an auction) about 100 km from where we live.

it's supposed ot be from Mirecourt circa 1910.

Is it worth the trip ?

 

 

auction1b.jpg

auction1.jpg

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She is looking for a viola bow?

And, of course, there's absolutely no way of knowing if it will be a good fit for her, before she has an opportunity to actually play it.

If you are shopping with the intent of having a spare, that may or not play well, but that doesn't really matter, since it's only for emergencies...that's different. ^_^

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34 minutes ago, sospiri said:

The grain behind the head is way out of alignment. 

Can you go into a little detail about that comment? I went back and looked closely at the wood behind the head and did not see that problem to which you refer 

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5 hours ago, Jul said:

...Is it worth the trip ?...

We cannot tell from these pictures if it is worth the trip or not.  If your daughter is a serious player and you are looking for what would become her main bow, you should go somewhere where she could try out a number of bows and select the one that is best suited for her and her instrument.  You cannot do this by going to look at one bow even if she could try it out.

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20 hours ago, Jul said:

I am still looking for a new bow for my daughter.

Is it worth the trip ?

 

Please don't buy a bow for a young player without knowing how it plays. If you don't play yourself, can you consult a good player or your daughter's teacher?

Most bows that end up in auction are there for a reason, and the most common reason is that they are unusable.

I know it's tempting to think that you can make a saving or get a bargain at an auction, but you always end up paying what something is worth.

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20 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Can you go into a little detail about that comment? I went back and looked closely at the wood behind the head and did not see that problem to which you refer 

 

4 hours ago, martin swan said:

Nor me 

 

4 hours ago, Brumcello said:

Is this the area Sospiri is talking about. I have always assumed the grain of the wood should ideally be parallel to the stick at this point

auction1b.jpg.638749fc8c9e554a6fe327f71879b8c9.jpg

 

50 minutes ago, fiddlecollector said:

That looks like two open pores running into each other.

The grain through the head and behind the head is 20⁰ out of alignment.

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9 minutes ago, Jul said:

very clear. thanks.

we intended to go to the auction to test the bow. 

It seems not to be worthwhile

I found an intermediate priced bow playing through a pile of new Brazilian bows at the local dealer, taking home 3 of them for a week's trial. I am not very accomplished and the differences between the bows was quite apparent. I still love the bow I selected and it looks great.

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7 hours ago, martin swan said:

How were you going to test it when it has no hair?

Of course, she can't play it. but still can check physically it's curent state of conservation, flexibiity of the stick, balance..

 

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3 hours ago, Jul said:

Of course, she can't play it. but still can check physically it's curent state of conservation, flexibiity of the stick, balance..

 

You can't test the balance without the hair on it, and the flex would be hard to evaluate unless you're a bow maker. It also looks like there is no tip plate on it. Don't bother going.

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4 hours ago, Jul said:

Of course, she can't play it. but still can check physically it's curent state of conservation, flexibiity of the stick, balance..

 

I'm meant to be a seasoned professional and I still don't trust myself to judge the playing qualities of a bow with no hair ...

Condition - take a powerful UV torch!

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I am on the hunt for violin bows at auction, not necessarily to play with, just as a new hobby.

Having said that, IF I were looking for a playing bow, or one for my children or students, I would never buy without playing with the bow and having the child/student play with the bow.  This is ABSOLUTELY a NO NO.  The whole point in getting your child/student a new bow is because they outgrew the current bow.  How can anyone tell if the new bow is an upgrade without having played it?  

I am no expert, but as Martin keeps pointing out, no hair!!! I don't know how you can tell balance and flexibility without the bow being in playing condition.  I am somewhat certain that the tension provided by the hair affects the stick's playing properties.

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On 5/28/2021 at 12:27 PM, sospiri said:

Looking closely at the photos, I think you may be right. 

this is precisely what i like most in Maestronet  : you can find answers from real experts !:lol:

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