Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Your favourite violin colour is:


Rue

What is your favourite overall colour for violins or other violin family instruments?  

37 members have voted

  1. 1. Your favourite overall violin/viola/cello/bass colour is:

    • Yellow
      1
    • Orange
      9
    • Red
      12
    • Light brown
      7
    • Dark brown
      4
    • "Black", old Viennese
      4


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Blank face said:


1. There's a difference between "believe" and "find". If the microscopical examination found soot but no iron there's not much left to believe.

2. Maybe I should have better written speculative instead of nonsense, but there where so many speculations about the reason why some particular varnishes are dark, that the pure mass makes it appear odd. Of course some varnish receipts might contain iron, others tar which both are turning black with time,

3. but this obviously doesn't apply to the Viennese nor in general "old German" violins.

4. One could accept that many of them were just made this way due to a particular taste of the period.

 

1. Was the microscopic analysis able to identify iron, in all its forms?

2. So you are admitting that both iron and tar content might turn some varnishes darker over time?

3. Why, or why not?

4. Sure, one could just take that approach. However, I've had enough experience with experimental varnishes changing color, that I think that's a "hide the head in the sand" approach. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 131
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

7 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

The viola I illustrated of my fathers had iron as a colour and got darker than he would have liked.https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/174737-is-thetertis-model-still-used-by-makers/&do=findComment&comment=648059

It is though quite different from the so called “Viennese” 18th C instruments. Viennese instruments before ca 1730 were in the rule yellow. The dark varnish was used by several generations of Vienese makers until about 1820, which shows that the colour was intentional and desired.

How does this demonstrate whether the change was intentional, or accidental?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

1. Was the microscopic analysis able to identify iron, in all its forms?

2. So you are admitting that both iron and tar content might turn some varnishes darker over time?

3. Why, or why not?

4. Sure, one could just take that approach.

The question for the quite possible unidentified iron contains appears to be superfluous when the proven contain of soot makes it much more probable that the dark colour was intended. That's IMO all what's necessary to know.

Like the iron coloured varnish the pitch (not exactly tar) contain has the meanwhile at several times discussed result of "alligator skin crazing" like below and is also very different from the discussed Viennese varnish.

 

IMG_8357.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

1. If you colour your varnish with soot, it is dark already.

2.They used this varnish over a period of ca. 100 years, and would have noticed any "change" should there have been one

1. Umh, nope. Soot can darken to any degree desired.

2. Who would have noticed? Those who were over 100 years of age?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Who would have noticed? Those who were over 100 years of age?

Simply those who were using the varnish receipts which they learned from their masters, who had also learned it from their masters and so on. That's called "a tradition" or "a violin making school".B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Blank face said:

The question for the quite possible unidentified iron contains appears to be superfluous when the proven contain of soot makes it much more probable that the dark colour was intended. That's IMO all what's necessary to know.

Like the iron coloured varnish the pitch (not exactly tar) contain has the meanwhile at several times discussed result of "alligator skin crazing" like below and is also very different from the discussed Viennese varnish.

 

IMG_8357.JPG

Most violins which were varnished, or were around during the heavy wood and coal-burning era (particularly in large cities) will have some soot content

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

People in hundreds of years will say, “Burgesses varnish must have changed. Nobody would have been daft enough to varnish his violins such a puke tinted orange”

What color is puke in Austria (not counting the green-colored beer upchucking taking place around St. Patrick's Day)? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Most violins which were varnished, or were around during the heavy wood and coal-burning era (particularly in large cities) will have some soot content

There's a huge difference between the regular and tight dispersion of deliberately added pigments and the very random and wide-meshed of accidental contamination visible in microscopical pictures.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My "good" violin is also a light honey brown. It's beautiful. :wub:

I tend to gravitate to the dark brown violins given a choice, but that certainly doesn't mean I don't see the beauty in other hues.

...er...except for the very orangey orange of course...^_^

(My "outdoor violin is red. I don't even  have a violin in my favourite colour! :lol:).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Rue said:

My "good" violin is also a light honey brown. It's beautiful. :wub:

I tend to gravitate to the dark brown violins given a choice, but that certainly doesn't mean I don't see the beauty in other hues.

...er...except for the very orangey orange of course...^_^

(My "outdoor violin is red. I don't even  have a violin in my favourite colour! :lol:).

Are your violins one colored?

Not brown and yellow interacting? Just brown?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Rue said:

I'm talking about the predominate colour. They all have shades of colour.

Why?  I have never chosen a violin for color.   I always find other things about the violin much more compelling.

I do not understand the impulse to put something complex like real violins into simplistic boxes like brown versus orange?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, David Beard said:

Why?  I have never chosen a violin for color.   I always find other things about the violin much more compelling.

I do not understand the impulse to put something complex like real violins into simplistic boxes like brown versus orange?

 

Well...you might not choose a violin for colour, but others will. 

So...if you're selling...I  would think customer preference might factor in your varnish choices.

And as far as the colour choices listed being simplistic, they really are not all that simple, as we've seen throughout this thread. 

And to try and list every conceivable colour combo would be nigh impossible and even less useful.

Grass is green. Grass comes in a kazillion shades of green (FWIW I am a bona fide expert in the colour of grass). I can just comment; 

"Oh! Look how green the grass is after a good rain!"

I don't need to say;

"Oh! Look how dark green with shades of dusty blue and subtle hints of pale yellow the grass is after a good rain!"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Rue said:

Well...you might not choose a violin for colour, but others will. 

So...if you're selling...I  would think customer preference might factor in your varnish choices.

And as far as the colour choices listed being simplistic, they really are not all that simple, as we've seen throughout this thread. 

And to try and list every conceivable colour combo would be nigh impossible and even less useful.

Grass is green. Grass comes in a kazillion shades of green (FWIW I am a bona fide expert in the colour of grass). I can just comment; 

"Oh! Look how green the grass is after a good rain!"

I don't need to say;

"Oh! Look how dark green with shades of dusty blue and subtle hints of pale yellow the grass is after a good rain!"

 

It just feels so wrong.

Now if you were polling young student violinists.  They might actually buy based on simplistic color categories.

If I called up a sod dealer on the phone and asked then describe some of my choices. If the guy said 'well, they're green' then I'd say 'fu funny man', and I'd call someone else.

But you're polling violin makers.  I doubt any of them would consider 'red' or 'orange' as a meaningful description of any violin color.   It seems such complete factory violin approach.

Anyway.  I guess it's just me.  And I apologize for the negative reaction.  I don't know why. But I tend to find these polls you make, trying simplify the aesthetics of violins into little simple boxes, I find them somehow viscerally offensive.  Which is definitely my problem, not yours.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...