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23 minutes ago, Rue said:

My daughter has anorexia athletica. She has it under control, but it will likely be a life-long issue.

Then the "has it under control" part of her obsession is the positive side that must be reinforced.  Is she very competitive? 

 

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16 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

Hoarding disorder or Pathological hoarding.

 

Too nonspecific! Labels are important in medicine because patients are comforted to some degree by the feeling that their condition is recognised (although it may not be understood). The trouble is the labels seem to proliferate and mutate spontaneously.

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It can't be bad that Nicky Keay is an Honorary Clinical Lecturer at University College. So was I. 

But to give an illustration of what can happen with labels and how little they mean, when I started we investigated a lot of patients for a condition then known as "hysteria" as misnamed by Charcot and misunderstood by Freud. Later on this mutated to conversion or dissociative disorder, now functional neurological disorder. Still nobody knows what causes it.

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17 hours ago, matesic said:

 

...............................when I started we investigated a lot of patients for a condition then known as "hysteria"........now functional neurological disorder.

Considering the number of male victims,

:ph34r::)

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On 5/21/2021 at 3:02 PM, matesic said:

It can't be bad that Nicky Keay is an Honorary Clinical Lecturer at University College. So was I. 

But to give an illustration of what can happen with labels and how little they mean, when I started we investigated a lot of patients for a condition then known as "hysteria" as misnamed by Charcot and misunderstood by Freud. Later on this mutated to conversion or dissociative disorder, now functional neurological disorder. Still nobody knows what causes it.

Nicky Keay explains and treats RED-S Relative Energy Defficiency in Sport. 

In reality this syndrome of undereating affects Women and Men, Boys and Girls in all walks of life. So yes very important work and this label is a real actual thing. So many people have disordered eating and false nutritional beliefs.

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8 hours ago, sospiri said:

Nicky Keay explains and treats RED-S Relative Energy Defficiency in Sport. 

In reality this syndrome of undereating affects Women and Men, Boys and Girls in all walks of life. So yes very important work and this label is a real actual thing. So many people have disordered eating and false nutritional beliefs.

I wouldn't deny it for an instant. I'm simply wondering who contrives these pompous Greek-derived labels that may or may not correspond closely to an actual entity but are often (I believe) calculated to imply greater understanding than we actually have.

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12 hours ago, matesic said:

I wouldn't deny it for an instant. I'm simply wondering who contrives these pompous Greek-derived labels that may or may not correspond closely to an actual entity but are often (I believe) calculated to imply greater understanding than we actually have.

When terms are chosen, they often derive from Greek, Roman or Latin. In part, due to tradition based on higher education levels, and also they are words that might not be commonly used in our day-day language, to avoid confusion or ambiguity.

I don't see a problem.

I'm not a fan of using long, unwieldy terminology or renaming terms.

Pick a word, stick to it. Call a spade a spade.

I'd rather just own "garbage man" (and use "man" to cover all of mankind) than rename the position "sanitation engineer".

 

 

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14 hours ago, matesic said:

I wouldn't deny it for an instant. I'm simply wondering who contrives these pompous Greek-derived labels that may or may not correspond closely to an actual entity but are often (I believe) calculated to imply greater understanding than we actually have.

Are you referring specifically to labels and diagnoses in Psychiatry?

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11 hours ago, Rue said:

Call a spade a spade.

Ah, but what do you mean by "spade"? Not everyone has the same mental dictionary

9 hours ago, sospiri said:

Are you referring specifically to labels and diagnoses in Psychiatry?

I confess I'm influenced here by Jon Ronson's "The psychopath test". The widely accepted and applied diagnostic criteria were established by a committee (largely influenced by one man) that formulated a check-list of 20 behavioural and psychological traits such as: glibness/superficial charm; grandiose sense of self-worth; cunning/manipulative; parasitic lifestyle etc. Each item is assessed on a 3-point scale and if the overall score is greater than 25 (30 in the US. I wonder why?) the subject is labelled "psychopathic", which of course everyone knows means "murderous". Naturally multiple conditions and caveats apply but you'll see my point. This disorder hasn't been discovered but invented for convenience, as has the label. Even non-psychiatric disorders that can be objectively confirmed are labelled arbitrarily, and the connotations of the label strongly influence public perception of the disorder and those who suffer from it. For example, fibromyalgia and polymyalgia might be considered siblings but are in fact very different in their physiological manifestations.

I don't know what I'd suggest to remedy this but abandonment of the pseudo-intellectual use of ancient Greek would be a start, and a clear distinction made between conditions that have a known physiological substrate and those that are hypothesised for medical convenience, useful as the latter often are.

I'm making full use of the latitude implied by the title of this thread!

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lol^

It is also important to realize that differential diagnoses of psychiatric conditions are often made by means of reading the patient's response to treatment. 

All in all, I prefer to discuss fiddles.

I have seen a few (3 or 4) over the years in actual thriftshops. None worth more than about 150USD, and the one that was, one had to go through the store manager to buy.

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9 hours ago, matesic said:

Ah, but what do you mean by "spade"? Not everyone has the same mental dictionary...

Just using the "usual" definition:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_a_spade_a_spade#:~:text=1.1 Usage-,Definition,strained formalities that may result.

Labels are important. They form part of our identity. They can reduce stress.

If you have an "ambiguous" health condition (example: fibromyalgia) I think it's a relief to be told you do/might have this condition versus being told "we can't find anything wrong with you, it's all in your head" or "you're just lazy."

The danger comes when labels are misused. I worked with an older guy once, on adult literacy. He had dyslexia. However, when he was a child that definable label didn't exist, so instead he was informally labelled as stupid, lazy, etc., which sadly (and incorrectly) formed his (life-long) self-opinion.

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17 minutes ago, Rue said:

Just using the "usual" definition:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_a_spade_a_spade#:~:text=1.1 Usage-,Definition,strained formalities that may result.

Labels are important. They form part of our identity. They can reduce stress.

If you have an "ambiguous" health condition (example: fibromyalgia) I think it's a relief to be told you do/might have this condition versus being told "we can't find anything wrong with you, it's all in your head" or "you're just lazy."

The danger comes when labels are misused. I worked with an older guy once, on adult literacy. He had dyslexia. However, when he was a child that definable label didn't exist, so instead he was informally labelled as stupid, lazy, etc., which sadly (and incorrectly) formed his (life-long) self-opinion.

When I was a kid, mentally disabled kids were called “retarded” because their development was retarded in its progress. Nothing wrong with that, but it was deemed offensive. Then “Mentally disabled” took over, until “disabled” was determined to be offensive. Major League Baseball officially changed the “Disabled List” to “injured List” because Baseball didn’t want to offend anyone. God help us.

And now, of course, children with developmental problems are called “differently abled.”

Oh Brother.

But a deaf kid still can’t hear Beethoven.

I probably have asbergers, but at my age no one cares. When I was a kid I was called a Daydreamer, and my head was always somewhere else, but I still did well in school. It’s nice to know now that I actually had a “thing.”

Oy.

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Any word/term can become a pejorative.

I don't understand how continually changing the term makes a difference to that happening.

I think you have to "own" the word - and insist it's used correctly.

The word "retarded" means "slow". There's nothing inherently wrong with that. But now it's become an unacceptable word (in daily parlance at least; still used in scientific terms).

Idiot, imbecile and moron were also words coined for different levels of mental retardation. They've been co-opted for public use as insults. Who doesn't still use "idiot" without even knowing the origin of the word?

(We might be a bit more sensitive to the other two terms).

It's only a matter of time before "differently abled" becomes politically incorrect.

Handicapped is another such term. In another province the accessibility bus was/is called "Handi-Transit". I think that's a great label, punny, easy to say and remember. My Mom used the service. All good. I automatically use that label in my current province - and get grief. Here the bus is called Access Transit. 

What does Access Transit even mean? It doesn't make sense. I can't remember it. Fine. Bad on me. But still...

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33 minutes ago, Rue said:

Any word/term can become a pejorative.

I don't understand how continually changing the term makes a difference to that happening.

I think you have to "own" the word - and insist it's used correctly.

The word "retarded" means "slow". There's nothing inherently wrong with that. But now it's become an unacceptable word (in daily parlance at least; still used in scientific terms).

Idiot, imbecile and moron were also words coined for different levels of mental retardation. They've been co-opted for public use as insults. Who doesn't still use "idiot" without even knowing the origin of the word?

(We might be a bit more sensitive to the other two terms).

It's only a matter of time before "differently abled" becomes politically incorrect.

Handicapped is another such term. In another province the accessibility bus was/is called "Handi-Transit". I think that's a great label, punny, easy to say and remember. My Mom used the service. All good. I automatically use that label in my current province - and get grief. Here the bus is called Access Transit. 

What does Access Transit even mean? It doesn't make sense. I can't remember it. Fine. Bad on me. But still...

Exactly. I think it’s incredibly funny when somebody talks about what “differently abled” means and my instinct is to say, “it means they’re retarded” although I never do. I have Asbergers, not Tourette’s haha.

But changing terminology doesn’t change the essence of whatever you are describing. Calling someone who is blind “differently abled” accomplishes nothing and is dishonest to boot.

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4 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

... I have Asbergers, not Tourette’s haha.

...

I believe "Asperger's" has also become pejorative. It's now ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). So, you are on the spectrum. 

I think the problem with that umbrella term is that it's too broad.

An individual with mild ASD and severe ASD are worlds apart.

(FWIW, I have brilliant coworkers with "Asperger's". I have a nephew with moderate autism, and a friend (who works in the field) whose daughter has severe autism (non verbal) requiring 24/7 care).

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15 minutes ago, Rue said:

I believe "Asperger's" has also become pejorative. It's now ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). So, you are on the spectrum. 

I think the problem with that umbrella term is that it's too broad.

An individual with mild ASD and severe ASD are worlds apart.

(FWIW, I have brilliant coworkers with "Asperger's". I have a nephew with moderate autism, and a friend (who works in the field) whose daughter has severe autism (non verbal) requiring 24/7 care).

Oh brother. So now Asbergers is offensive? And we have to use terms that are so general they mean nothing by themselves but have to be clarified using terms that are basically the same as those which were deemed offensive in the first place?

sheesh.

And yes my Asbergers it whatever it is is the source of my creativity. I am happy with who I am.

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