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You could buy a strong Charles Bazin with guaranteed authenticity and a clean bill of health for only a little more than the current bid price - strange that people will risk this amount of money on a totally untested bow just to prove they are clever.

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58 minutes ago, Jeny Mahon said:

I am quite sure it will return for an encore, probably two or three.  

Probably.

Instruments in Goodwill auctions tend to go for very high prices, presumably because there is a way to write-off some of the cost as a charitable contribution (price paid - appraised value = charitable donation).

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1 hour ago, GeorgeH said:

Probably.

Instruments in Goodwill auctions tend to go for very high prices, presumably because there is a way to write-off some of the cost as a charitable contribution (price paid - appraised value = charitable donation).

Alas, no -- per the Goodwill site:

"Unfortunately purchases made through Goodwill would not be tax deductible, only donations made to Goodwill would qualify as being tax deductible. When you purchase an item through shopgoodwill.com you are paying fair market value for the item."

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14 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Not when fair market value includes copious amounts of shill bidding by goodwill

Ummm...that's the very definition of "fair market value."

It is the amount that the seller and buyer agree to.

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5 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

No it is the amount the seller and the seller agree to, no buyer involved

Please re-read my reply.  The definition of FMV is the amount that the buyer and seller agree to, not your interpretation of whether the buyer/seller is some sort of strawman, or other allegedly fraudulent party.

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58 minutes ago, fragslap said:

Alas, no -- per the Goodwill site:

"Unfortunately purchases made through Goodwill would not be tax deductible, only donations made to Goodwill would qualify as being tax deductible. When you purchase an item through shopgoodwill.com you are paying fair market value for the item."

Good catch. Still, I wonder if that could be argued if the purchase were found to be substantially different than as described in listing and you had an expert appraisal?

Personally, I never tried it, and never would. 

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6 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

What is fascinating about this article, which I read it in its entirety,  is not that there are snake oil salesman aplenty in the world, But that it is so difficult to call them out.

I don't think that TV companies cared whether she was a fraud with a narcissistic personality disorder or not. She became famous in the UK by examining people's faeces and telling them why their diet was crap.

A bit like Uri Geller pretending he has psychic and telekinetic powers. Pure showbiz built on tricks and lies.

Calling them out is fun though. And besides she is not actually a healthy eater. She has Orthorexia, an unhealthy obsession with so called healthy diet.

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On 5/19/2021 at 8:18 AM, GeorgeH said:

Probably.

Instruments in Goodwill auctions tend to go for very high prices, presumably because there is a way to write-off some of the cost as a charitable contribution (price paid - appraised value = charitable donation).

Also the whole idea of "getting a steal" because it's Goodwill, and Goodwill representing all of their items as donated to a charitable organization.  I know for a fact that SGW has listed items that were purchased on eBay for much less than they are sold for on the SGW site.  Pretty sketchy considering the buyers are told the items were "free" and they are doing a good deed by buying them to support the cause.  This might lead some people to pay more than they would otherwise.  

 

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On 5/19/2021 at 11:25 PM, sospiri said:

Orthorexia, an unhealthy obsession with so called healthy diet.

I'm baffled as to how a term that translates as "correct appetite" could become a label for a disorder. It's just another meaningless neologism with no medical validity

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29 minutes ago, matesic said:

I'm baffled as to how a term that translates as "correct appetite" could become a label for a disorder. It's just another meaningless neologism with no medical validity

Orthorexia Nervosa. It's a relatively new term used as a diagnosis of someone who is obsessed with 'healthy eating' to the point where it rules their lives.

If you believe it has no medical validity, then ask a Dietician if they agree. But make sure their qualifications are real.

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Eating disorders are real. They're all the same in that they are a result of an obsession to the point of malnutrition and starvation.

They're all different as to what the focus of the obsession is.

My daughter has anorexia athletica. She has it under control, but it will likely be a life-long issue.

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I'd love to know who invents these terms, some of which have more validity than others. I gather "Atypical Child Syndrome" was suggested but never caught on. What would you call an unhealthy obsession with model trains, or violin bows? It would be tricky to find appropriate ancient Greek nouns.

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