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Plaster of Paris ground


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30 minutes ago, arglebargle said:

Sorry, off topic, but since we're discussing varnish (adjacent) things I thought it might be easier than starting a new topic.

Does anyone use bloxygen (inert Argon gas) to store and preserve varnish between uses? Anyone use anything else? Thanks!

Put it into smaller and smaller bottles to limit the air space.

Excessive air exposure often badly affects wine and some people do purge partially empty bottles of wine with inert gases.  Although these gas purging devices and their small gas cylinders are relatively inexpensive I have found it is better to simply drink all of the wine in the bottle.  

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8 hours ago, arglebargle said:

Does anyone use bloxygen (inert Argon gas) to store and preserve varnish between uses? Anyone use anything else? Thanks!

This has worked for me. Carefully put a few drops of alcohol in the jar of varnish, put a flame to it, light it and quickly screw the lid on.

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53 minutes ago, DonLeister said:

This has worked for me. Carefully put a few drops of alcohol in the jar of varnish, put a flame to it, light it and quickly screw the lid on.

Good idea, except if you accidentally knock the jar over while rushing to put the cap on, you might wind up responsible for a major catastrophic fire.

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I've used propane from long-nose gas lighter. Propane is heavier than air and displaces air inside he can/ bottle. Just screw on the cap/lid, don't light it :-).

One of my friends recommended using thin plastic foil insetretd inside and blow it uplike balloon so it touches the varnish andcreates barrier between the air and the varnish. Screw cap over the foil. A bit messy but works. He uses it for common spar varnishes in cans or similar so wasting atiny bit of varnish is no big deal.

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I thank this forum because it suggests experiments to me. In planning to try gypsum, I found an old piece of wallboard, possibly very old, it seems. I cut off a corner. I noticed that it seemed to be very tough and strong wallboard. I thought “Well, these New Zealanders really know how to make good wallboard, much stronger than that crumbly stuff I had worked with in North Carolina.” I ground up a small piece, hoping to do a test for my violin ground. That evening I noticed a painful splinter of something in my hand, too small to see, but definitely there. I got out my loupe and found the tiniest sliver I have ever seen. Next day I examined the wallboard with my loupe. Horrified, I saw many tiny slivers standing straight up in the wallboard. I see that asbestos has been banned in wallboard in the USA, and probably in NZ too. So I must have encountered a really old piece of it. So, my friends, BE WARNED!
 

 

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