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Plaster of Paris ground


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13 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Joe is extremely generous with his hard won experience. We are all in debt to him and his products remain the favorites of some of the world's greatest makers. I'd be willing to bet he has some methods and insight that he keeps close to the vest, and I believe that's as it should be. 

I fully agree!

One of the most difficult things for me has been breaking the language barrier, because US English lacks depth (no offence, but it is really a retarded, simple, backward striving language, if you believe in evolution)

And now I probably did offend? Not intended.

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Just now, Peter K-G said:

I fully agree!

One of the most difficult things for me has been breaking the language barrier, because US English lacks depth (no offence, but it is really a retarded, simple, backward striving language, if you believe in evolution)

And now I probably did offend? Not intended.

I won't disagree that English has its limitations. I'd point out, having lived both places, that this linguistic issue is not isolated to west of the Atlantic.

What is offensive is your use of the word "retarded". I suggest you avoid it in the future.

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2 minutes ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

Just how common is a plain linseed oil ground?  It seems no one uses it these days?  

Dunno how common it is to just use linseed oil. Surely someone does it, enough has been written on it. Joe's system includes a little oil in the last step (the ground varnish), but the previous steps all seal pretty well against overpenetration. 

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Perhaps this should be in its own thread called pozzolana. Here in New Zealand, there are volcanic rocks. Pumice rocks. They float on water. I have one. I ground a bit of my rock into powder. Then placed the powder into water, and let it settle. Pics attached.

After 1 minute:

After two days:

The finest particles are like clay. Less than 2 microns.

Apparently I could mix the powder with lime and get Roman cement.

0A1B3907-AF8A-43D3-9F96-AC81725E524D.jpeg

9914DB62-5B63-4C3A-8AD3-4707627D3074.jpeg

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18 hours ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

Just how common is a plain linseed oil ground?  It seems no one uses it these days?  

This is my interest. I see and hear no reason to use anything else. But it has to be done properly. Minimal amounts applied carefully. It seals just fine, dries quickly enough and is not affected by dust. No great UV exposure is required.

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20 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I'll be interested to hear Joe's reply. Judging by his product line, I'd guess he's not a mineral guy, but I could be (and often am) wrong.

For me, it's oil and resin all the way. Rocks are for geologists.

But as a grain filler for certain types of maple, would it not be useful to you?

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9 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

It hasn't ever seemed to be necessary to me, no matter the wood. Lots of other ways to get there. I don't do minerals or proteins.

Neither do I but some wood has a more open grain, where such a transparent mineral filler might be useful?

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On 5/22/2021 at 11:03 AM, Peter K-G said:

Yeah, refractive index has become trendy now.

But seriously, transparency is much more important than refractive index.

It is easy to reach that conclusion when all the common drying oil varnishes and spirit varnishes have refractive indexes that are compatible with spruce and maple. So one need only worry about the transparency of the varnish.

There is a reason freshly prepped wood, scrapped or sanded, appears whitish with a lack of deep detail: the surface is actually quite rough on a microscopic level causing a good deal of light to be scattered. Applying a varnish with compatible refractive index eliminates a good part of the scattering and sharply reveals the grain and wood coloring.

Again, this is something finishers do not need to think about unless they are using some special ground that might mess with the natural match between modern varnishes and wood.

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On 5/22/2021 at 10:16 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

What is offensive is your use of the word "retarded". I suggest you avoid it in the future.

Thanks for saying that. Unfortunately, some people still think it is funny.

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5 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

There's no accounting for taste, or lack of it. Glad I'm not the only one who values civility, at least

I know huh? we should totally pity these people and somehow feel morally superior to them at the same time.

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On 5/22/2021 at 8:26 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

I'll be interested to hear Joe's reply. Judging by his product line, I'd guess he's not a mineral guy, but I could be (and often am) wrong.

For me, it's oil and resin all the way. Rocks are for geologists.

Rocks are heavy.  Putting powdered rocks on a violin makes it heavier and less loud.

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2 hours ago, jezzupe said:

I know huh? we should totally pity these people and somehow feel morally superior to them at the same time.

I have no pity for practitioners of bigotry. Having a laugh at the use of a word that is broadly thought of as offensive, otherizing, and discriminatory is textbook immorality. I don't feel morally superior to someone who behaves in this way, I am objectively so. 

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14 hours ago, ctanzio said:

It is easy to reach that conclusion when all the common drying oil varnishes and spirit varnishes have refractive indexes that are compatible with spruce and maple. So one need only worry about the transparency of the varnish.

There is a reason freshly prepped wood, scrapped or sanded, appears whitish with a lack of deep detail: the surface is actually quite rough on a microscopic level causing a good deal of light to be scattered. Applying a varnish with compatible refractive index eliminates a good part of the scattering and sharply reveals the grain and wood coloring.

Again, this is something finishers do not need to think about unless they are using some special ground that might mess with the natural match between modern varnishes and wood.

Yes,

And regarding fillers, POP, Pumice or Colloidal silica (or whatever). They are used to plug end wood, runouts and pores (maple).

It really don't make any difference which one you use as long as you don't apply a layer of it.

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1 hour ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I have no pity for practitioners of bigotry. Having a laugh at the use of a word that is broadly thought of as offensive, otherizing, and discriminatory is textbook immorality. I don't feel morally superior to someone who behaves in this way, I am objectively so. 

Uh oh, has Walla Walla become a haven for sissy-thinkers, believing that they are morally superior, without any objective evidence?

My grandfather, who owned a farm near Walla Walla, and my mother who grew up there, were actually doers, not posers. Would I be totally wrong by characterizing Walla Walla today as a fairly wealthy wine-producing area, which has mostly lost touch with its roots, people like my mother and her father?

-

 

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1 hour ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I have no pity for practitioners of bigotry. Having a laugh at the use of a word that is broadly thought of as offensive, otherizing, and discriminatory is textbook immorality. I don't feel morally superior to someone who behaves in this way, I am objectively so. 

or in others words your woke, ie. person who's been modified by the media It's ok Jackson you can laugh at other people and marginalized groups if you want to, but something tells me you're above all that.

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