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Can you help me to identify this violin and how old is it?


LouisXVI
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It is probably JTL mass production , made around 1900. But photos are very bad. 

NB: Are you are trying to buy a french instrument? previous were cheap Markneukirchen mass production someone probably tried to sell you as french  , now not better staff, but still not a much better  instrument. Hope you have not paid more than 4-5 hundreds for them? 

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Hello guys, thanks so much for you help. In order to complain with yours and lord  sauders petition of better quality pictures I took these ones when cleaning the instrument.

Hope it gives you a better idea.

Thanks in advance!

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Personally I've never seen a JTL quite like this ...

The varnish wipe on the edges is not characteristic, the purfling corners also don't look very French to me, and the the f-holes are pretty quirky - not really what you'd see from very standardized factory production.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, LouisXVI said:

Hi Mathieu, I thought I already complied with that. Could you please tell me what pictures are missing?

 

Putting the instrument against a neutral gray or beige backdrop rather than having furniture and paintings behind it would help. Also adjusting camera angles so that profile shapes can be seen straight on.

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Louis,

It might seem that the experts are being fussy about the pictures but it's not easy to identify violins without having them in hand (OK, some are easy to pigeonhole).

Subtle differences can be the tells to an ID and if the angles of the photos are a little off or the background makes things hard to pick out, or certain features are not readily visible, etc., it can often make the difference between "it's X" and "I don't know."

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5 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Putting the instrument against a neutral gray or beige backdrop rather than having furniture and paintings behind it would help. Also adjusting camera angles so that profile shapes can be seen straight on.

Exactly. + photo of inside (cornerblock).

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If there's a JTL brand, then it's a JTL. After that, there were higher quality violins produced, and some excellent makers who did produce some very fine "copies d'ancien." Take a look at the the Viaduct violins site for a wide variety of JTL examples, some quite "artistic" and even "quirky."

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Posted (edited)

Hi my friend, yes, I agree, I was just hoping that maybe someone would be able to distinguish the possible maker/luthier that made it at JTL.

Having said that I attach pictures of the corner blocks and the other ones with better resolution. Looking forward to your opinion. Thanks in advance!

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Edited by LouisXVI
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I think that you'll find that virtually all JTL violins are "factory violins", not made by single makers.

"By 1925 the craft was organised into 18 workshops and 4 factories employing nearly 700 workers, most of whom were very skilled craftsmen. 
There were also some women makers, although much fewer in number.  Probably the largest of these so-called factories was Jerome THIBOUVILLE-LAMY, or J.T.L. but they coexisted well with the smaller family ateliers."

laberte

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To me this doesn't look French neither. The "stamp" appears to be scratched in, not branded; nor did I ever see such a sort of stamp. The lyre sign is usually printed on a small paper label and glued in (s. photo below). If there's a stamp you will find it on the upper block in big letters.

Probably some jerk tried to pimp it up a (otherwise quite nice) Saxon or Czech violin including a clear overcoating. Unnecessary, the value won't be very different wether it's Mirecourt factory or good cottage industry.

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