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History of the cadenza


khaldrogo
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In my musical dictionary it tells me what a cadenza is, but I've lately been wondering about the history of the cadenza. 
It seems that in Baroque music-a Vivaldi concerto for example-there are no cadenzas. Did they start showing up in late Baroque, early Classical, late Classical...? 
Is it just a string instrument sort of thing or are there horn cadenzas, keyboard cadenzas, flute cadenzas, etc...? 
Not having listened to other instrument music as carefully as violin pieces I just don't know. Who was the first composer to include a cadenza?

Edited by khaldrogo
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10 hours ago, khaldrogo said:

It seems that in Baroque music-a Vivaldi concerto for example-there are no cadenzas. Did they start showing up in late Baroque, early Classical, late Classical...? 
Is it just a string instrument sort of thing or are there horn cadenzas, keyboard cadenzas, flute cadenzas, etc...? 
Not having listened to other instrument music as carefully as violin pieces I just don't know. Who was the first composer to include a cadenza?

1. Bach was a baroque composer.  There are cadenzas in the Brandenburg Concertos, Bach Violin Cto in E-minor.

2. Haydn Trumpet Cto has a cadenza.  Mozart Operas have vocal cadenzas for several arias.  Piano concertos have cadenzas.

3. Bach?

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Oh, they are really old, older than western notated music. It was used in folk music, and in medieval music. The first notated examples seems to be from the 1400s. It is common in all instrumental and in vocal music as a part of the en point d'orgue in the ending cadence (part of the way the chords are used in the  music) from all notated periods. 

During the baroque period the composers thought that they where more important than the performer and they started notating the cadenza to "hinder" the performer from tastless improvising, but it didn't really catch on until the 1900s with a few exceptions, like the Mendelssohn and Joachim concerti.

Oh, and there are some cadenzas written by Vivaldi for his concertos as well, see for example his Violin Concerto in D, RV 212.

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On 4/22/2021 at 9:14 PM, khaldrogo said:

Who was the first composer to include a cadenza?

I guess the OP's question was really who was the first to actually compose and publish cadenzas for their concertos, instead of just putting a fermata and leaving it to the players to fill the gap.

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23 minutes ago, J-G said:

I guess the OP's question was really who was the first to actually compose and publish cadenzas for their concertos, instead of just putting a fermata and leaving it to the players to fill the gap.

OP just republished a question from almost 20 years ago... weird: 

 

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34 minutes ago, Stephen Fine said:

OP just republished a question from almost 20 years ago... weird: 

 

Necrothreading bots?  Some new spamming strategy?  Proof of principle tests of a new hacking technique?   I've noticed a lot of thread necromancy lately.  :rolleyes:

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22 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Necrothreading bots?  Some new spamming strategy?  Proof of principle tests of a new hacking technique?   I've noticed a lot of thread necromancy lately.  :rolleyes:

My curiosity is piqued.  There's another one now.

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