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Where to Buy Digital Versions of Suzuki Violin School 1–10 by Shinichi Suzuki?


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2 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Yes. Who get teaching jobs at “The Famous University” and then are never there because they are touring, and their TA does most of the work.

In the '50s my teacher got an invitation to come and "share" with Oistrakh for three months at the Moscow C/tory. He saw Oistrakh ONCE for maybe 30 minutes. O entered the room, the TA informed him who's the student and what he prepared, the student played a couple of bars from Pag 5 ( I think...) when O stopped him, took his violin, played the entire thing very well, advised the chap to practice longer hours and...left. O's main time eater was his political career - he was a member of their parliament or something like that and had a couple of other political executive responsibilities.  To recap, if somebody claims he studied with O it might not mean much if anything. 

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5 hours ago, Carl Stross said:

Means NOTHING.  

Not advocating, just saying it works as a path, as many others would for, as you say, talented kids. Mostly, daughters beginning teacher used the books minus the dogma. I remember a teacher at camp (studied with Suzuki himself) started talking about "tonalization" and my daughter had no idea what she was talking about.

 Indifferent teachers should find another line of work.

Playing Bruch well by 12 is pretty much the minimum for a kid wanting to go to a decent performance program at college age these days.

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1 hour ago, Potter said:

Not advocating, just saying it works as a path, as many others would for, as you say, talented kids. Mostly, daughters beginning teacher used the books minus the dogma. I remember a teacher at camp (studied with Suzuki himself) started talking about "tonalization" and my daughter had no idea what she was talking about.

 Indifferent teachers should find another line of work.

Playing Bruch well by 12 is pretty much the minimum for a kid wanting to go to a decent performance program at college age these days.

You are correct but incomplete. I tell my students two things:

1) “If you were going to make it as a musician, you would already have made it as a musician by now.”

2) “Do something with music in college. Double major, in music and something else, anything else. There is no greater joy than playing in a good college orchestra. Everyone is enthusiastic, everyone is playing all-time masterpieces for the first time, and the excitement will never be so high again. Everybody can, everybody cares, everybody works. No matter what you do with your life, if you do music in college, you remember it all your life.”

And then, if they prove to be an exception to #1, everybody is happy.

 

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On 4/19/2021 at 5:49 PM, PhilipKT said:

You are correct but incomplete. I tell my students two things:

1) “If you were going to make it as a musician, you would already have made it as a musician by now.”

2) “Do something with music in college. Double major, in music and something else, anything else. There is no greater joy than playing in a good college orchestra. Everyone is enthusiastic, everyone is playing all-time masterpieces for the first time, and the excitement will never be so high again. Everybody can, everybody cares, everybody works. No matter what you do with your life, if you do music in college, you remember it all your life.”

And then, if they prove to be an exception to #1, everybody is happy.

Not important which school we all went to, but with the exception of having a terrible conductor, the school ( college, university ) orchestra can be a wonderful experience.

You are so correct in this. And as expected, there are some down sides. It can be difficult for some as some schools that have multiple orchestras for non-majors, majors, opera, baroque, whatever ensembles or one ensemble for all skills ... cliques, elitism and but holes can make playing in the ensemble a horrible experience. I have been in some tough, unfriendly or competitive groups. Or being stuck in too easy a group? But that is a fallacy to most students as they should still play their best. 

But getting 2 concerts a grading period, twelve?? !!! rehearsals and getting to visit with visiting scholars can be a bunch of special experiences. Every time I walk into a hall or a church or home to rehearse or perform, I feel very privileged to be there, in that space, to be playing, making sound with others. Sure, it can be inconvenient, meeting when scheduling are busy. Sure, it might be a requirement. One pays for the class...

College was confusing and difficult for me given the amount of work and the opportunity to achieve. Given that opportunity, I felt a great degree of pressure and the grief or stress that follows mostly over trying to be a better musician. But the Orchestra class and the reaching for more of "something" that was not achievable in solo Bach or Paganini double-stops made me feel so much better. Twice a week... getting away from the 3rd Sonata was like a champagne brunch.

When talking to students, some think of the orchestra class as frivolous and not worthy of study, but I try to persuade them that being prepared might be one of the most important lessons in life. The students often do not understand ( or try to understand ) as they are focused only on one or two things in their lives. Sometimes unrelated, like love interests and jobs, but I do ( or try ro ) understand.

I believe so much in what you point out, that I do spend additional time reviewing orchestral literature. If there are a few students willing to meet, we learn together. This encourages players, especially self- absorbed first violins, to hear the other parts. This also encourages ( forcing them ) to learn to articulate together and listen to each other. Chamber music group lessons is one thing. Group Orchestral practice, when done properly is very effective.

Kids are difficult to negotiate with ( and therefore a pain ) because most will not listen to the teacher, but will bend for their peers. I remind them that they ( their parents ) pay me and not their friends.

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1 minute ago, GoPractice said:

Not important which school we all went to, but with the exception of having a terrible conductor, the school ( college, university ) orchestra can be a wonderful experience.

You are so correct in this. And as expected, there are some down sides. It can be difficult for some as some schools that have multiple orchestras for non-majors, majors, opera, baroque, whatever ensembles or one ensemble for all skills ... cliques, elitism and but holes can make playing in the ensemble a horrible experience. I have been in some tough, unfriendly or competitive groups. Or being stuck in too easy a group? But that is a fallacy to most students as they should still play their best. 

But getting 2 concerts a grading period, twelve?? !!! rehearsals and getting to visit with visiting scholars can be a bunch of special experiences. Every time I walk into a hall or a church or home to rehearse or perform, I feel very privileged to be there, in that space, to be playing, making sound with others. Sure, it can be inconvenient, meeting when scheduling are busy. Sure, it might be a requirement. One pays for the class...

College was confusing and difficult for me given the amount of work and the opportunity to achieve. Given that opportunity, I felt a great degree of pressure and the grief or stress that follows mostly over trying to be a better musician. But the Orchestra class and the reaching for more of "something" that was not achievable in solo Bach or Paganini double-stops made me feel so much better. Twice a week... getting away from the 3rd Sonata was like a champagne brunch.

When talking to students, some think of the orchestra class as frivolous and not worthy of study, but I try to persuade them that being prepared might be one of the most important lessons in life. The students often do not understand ( or try to understand ) as they are focused only on one or two things in their lives. Sometimes unrelated, like love interests and jobs, but I do ( or try ro ) understand.

I believe so much in what you point out, that I do spend additional time reviewing orchestral literature. If there are a few students willing to meet, we learn together. This encourages players, especially self- absorbed first violins, to hear the other parts. This also encourages ( forcing them ) to learn to articulate together and listen to each other. Chamber music group lessons is one thing. Group Orchestral practice, when done properly is very effective.

Kids are difficult to negotiate with ( and therefore a pain ) because most will not listen to the teacher, but will bend for their peers. I remind them that they ( their parents ) pay me and not their friends.

AMEN!

I played some music in college that I have never played since, simply because it was so expensive to put on, or wouldn’t sell tickets. The Jongen Sinfonie Concertante is a work of genius but no one flocks to the concert hall to hear it. But we did it.

Anshel Brusilow, In his autobiography, called our performance, in San Antonio, of “Also Sprach Zarathustra” One of the greatest concerts he had ever conducted, and he was incredibly disappointed that there was no recording made. Even the warhorses were lovingly treated.
Our first concert included Dvorak’s New World, And I have played that symphony many times since with never that much enthusiasm and only rarely that much quality.

The combination of enthusiasm and skill is far superior than skill alone, and that’s why an outstanding college orchestra can be better than many professional groups. 

I could go on and on about my college orchestra. It was really good, the conductor was world class, and the music was very well chosen.

Great memories...

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On 4/30/2021 at 12:36 PM, PhilipKT said:

AMEN!

I played some music in college that I have never played since, simply because it was so expensive to put on, or wouldn’t sell tickets. The Jongen Sinfonie Concertante is a work of genius but no one flocks to the concert hall to hear it. But we did it.

Anshel Brusilow, In his autobiography, called our performance, in San Antonio, of “Also Sprach Zarathustra” One of the greatest concerts he had ever conducted, and he was incredibly disappointed that there was no recording made. Even the warhorses were lovingly treated.
Our first concert included Dvorak’s New World, And I have played that symphony many times since with never that much enthusiasm and only rarely that much quality.

The combination of enthusiasm and skill is far superior than skill alone, and that’s why an outstanding college orchestra can be better than many professional groups. 

I could go on and on about my college orchestra. It was really good, the conductor was world class, and the music was very well chosen.

Great memories...

Wow, how great... Have always wanted to play the Jongen. Still chasing after a Mahler 9 too ( that was not an amateur orchestra. That's the one with the pipes?

How was Brusilow? Heard he was patient in an era of hard to work with conductors.

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5 hours ago, GoPractice said:

Wow, how great... Have always wanted to play the Jongen. Still chasing after a Mahler 9 too ( that was not an amateur orchestra. That's the one with the pipes?

How was Brusilow? Heard he was patient in an era of hard to work with conductors.

As an opera musician, I am blessed to work with literally some of the greatest conductors in the world, because it is much harder to conduct opera well then it is to conduct Symphonic music well, because of all the extra elements of opera, and I can honestly say that Anshel Brusilow Is one of the two or three greatest musicians I’ve ever worked with. Playing in the orchestra with him conducting a solo, wherever the piece or instrument, was pure joy. He was incredible.. he also had an amazing personality, charming, and magnetic, and he could charm an audience like no one else.

I have many stories, all of them true...

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Richardson? I used to get sushi there when visiting kin folk. The museums, the crazy fair ground, public market in South Dallas? 

I miss Texas for all its complexity. Have a student in Austin and may visit him for next year for his graduation. This year's graduations are a wash. I wanted to visit Curtis and still may do so, but the current situation is strange. I have had both shots of the vaccine but still awkward travelling. This re-opening needs to be thought out carefully,

Must say, I would love to hear your stories. A lawn chair, some drinks, a cool night...

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