Color list for retouching (alcohol soluble)


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Hello, 

I would like advices about what alcohol soluble colors to purchase for retouching. 

(I lost a box with such colors and aniline dyes after moving from my old place. So, I have all my oil and water colours but not alcohol soluble.)

I had purchased many colors  from Hammerl in the past and I was very satisfied. 

If someone has to suggest a colour list, (the fewest to do the most of the job) it would be very helpful. 

Thank you

 

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Most usable for the fewest? We're talking alcohol soluble dyes, right?

I would think primary colors plus a couple of modifiers (like lamp black, burnt umber, a soft yellowish ocher, etc... so your retouch doesn't look like you used Kool-aid on a brush).

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21 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

Most usable for the fewest? We're talking alcohol soluble dyes, right?

I would think primary colors plus a couple of modifiers (like lamp black, burnt umber, a soft yellowish ocher, etc... so your retouch doesn't look like you used Kool-aid on a brush).

Agreed.

I don’t know that I’ve ever used “lamp black”, but I’ve been using the same 2 ounce container of “ivory black” for at least 30 years.  I think I have about 30 years worth left...

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5 minutes ago, Mark Norfleet said:

I don’t know that I’ve ever used “lamp black”, but I’ve been using the same 2 ounce container of “ivory black” for at least 30 years.  I think I have about 30 years worth left...

I think that's probably what mine is.... had it forever and I'm sure I'll go to the grave with most of it still in a plastic container.  :) 

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39 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

Most usable for the fewest? We're talking alcohol soluble dyes, right?

I would think primary colors plus a couple of modifiers (like lamp black, burnt umber, a soft yellowish ocher, etc... so your retouch doesn't look like you used Kool-aid on a brush).

Do kids these days know who Mr. Kool is? 
 

Some of the best advice I was ever given was to use both dyes and pigments so that my retouch doesn’t either look like koolaid or a coat of paint.  

15 minutes ago, Mark Norfleet said:

Agreed.

I don’t know that I’ve ever used “lamp black”, but I’ve been using the same 2 ounce container of “ivory black” for at least 30 years.  I think I have about 30 years worth left...

Mine is “furnace black.” I wonder if at the end of the day if they are really all that different. 
 

All that being said, most everyday retouching for me tends to be Old Wood alcohol colors in black and orange, an Indian yellow pigment, and a burnt umber pigment.  I’ve got a lot more that come out for specific things - The key to any retouching seems to be testing and knowing your materials.

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47 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

soft yellowish ocher

Thank you all for your answers. 

Of course we speak only for alcochol soluble colors. I would like suggestions about those modifiers. 

Before some days I was missing that yellowish ochre and I could not retouch properly a wood addition on a top. (I was trying hours, +I asked help from a friend that it is painter). 

 

 

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You could take a diamond and pulverize it very finely...

A quick question before I start running chromatography experiments:

Crayola art markers are all water-soluble and non-toxic. Would you consider them as good color match test tools (using bright white paper) or do you prefer to start working with pigments right away?

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56 minutes ago, Bodacious Cowboy said:

Ivory black and lamp black aren’t the same. Lamp black has a hint of blue, which is helpful, I think.

Here in Europe and personally from my ancestors, we use at the most the nero fumo - or just fumo- i think is the lamp black. 

The stories refer that many poor artis were scratching old burned metal vessels to get the black (Nero di carbone) . 

Fumo was producing the purple  blue of the Mediterranean houses. 

White lime + a bit of Fumo turns the colour to a lovely blue hue. (+linseed oil) 

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