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Violin models of the present and future


Arbos
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15 minutes ago, deans said:

Sometimes on this board everyone likes to assume that everything in the violin world can be attributed to foolishness.

No, explaining the violin world is much more complicated.  What about pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, and sloth?  :huh:  :lol:

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4 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

No, explaining the violin world is much more complicated.  What about pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, and sloth?  :huh:  :lol:

Maybe we can add an 8th, violin ownership.

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1 hour ago, deans said:

Maybe we can add an 8th, violin ownership.

Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa................   :lol:  If Dante had been writing after fiddles were invented, it might have had its own circle.  ;) 

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2 hours ago, deans said:

Sometimes on this board everyone likes to assume that everything in the violin world can be attributed to foolishness.

Sometimes it can. Which of the most horrible-sounding Stradivaris has failed to find a buyer?

Being able to say that one either owns or plays a Sradivari may reap better rewards than even a boob job, or a dick extension. :lol:

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19 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Sometimes it can. Which of the most horrible-sounding Stradivaris has failed to find a buyer?

Being able to say that one either owns or plays a Sradivari may reap better rewards than even a boob job, or a dick extension. :lol:

How did this topic end up at the terrible sounding Strad's?

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7 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Given the speed of technological advances, and the formulation of new materials, it seems we could be one of the last generations to experience violins in their traditional guise.
Your Tardis might only have a short trip.

I'd say it's a coinflip between a future of electro-synth and lasers or a bunch of Ewoks banging on rotten logs singing "Yib nub".

 

Electric jaw harps should never be a thing.  I'm 75%-80% certain of this.

I am hoping for an inflatable cello some day.

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23 minutes ago, deans said:

How did this topic end up at the terrible sounding Strad's?

You were talking about copies, weren't you? Stradivaris, both good and bad are probably the most copied fiddles, ranging from a fake label in a junk fiddle, to what is produced by the best copyists and antiquers.

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How do you know what the “good” ones are? Doesn’t taste count? I tried a 1689 Strad that I liked a lot (and supposedly those are not as good as the Golden Period ones) and then I was not impressed with the del Gesu “Mary Portman” that was played by Kreisler.

 

Also I am not trying to say that everybody in this business acts foolishly, but sometimes I wish people were more naive and just bought what they liked. That would be a more sensible decision than purchasing the copy of what a soloist likes.

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13 minutes ago, Arbos said:

Also I am not trying to say that everybody in this business acts foolishly, but sometimes I wish people were more naive and just bought what they liked. That would be a more sensible decision than purchasing the copy of what a soloist likes.

I get your point. Its just that I see a lot of really good luthiers making great instruments that happen to be copies, that seem to work well in general, for everyone.

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35 minutes ago, Arbos said:

How do you know what the “good” ones are? Doesn’t taste count? I tried a 1689 Strad that I liked a lot (and supposedly those are not as good as the Golden Period ones) and then I was not impressed with the del Gesu “Mary Portman” that was played by Kreisler.

 

Also I am not trying to say that everybody in this business acts foolishly, but sometimes I wish people were more naive and just bought what they liked. That would be a more sensible decision than purchasing the copy of what a soloist likes.

Nature of the beast with classical music.  Everyone dresses in same black pants/dress, and everyone must play instruments that look like the standard.  Very different than '80s hair rock where everyone gets to pick their own pattern of spandex pants.  If I remember history right, we can blame some Italian duke for setting the violin standard.  I blame France for the metric system.

 

 

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My take - you'd be silly not to study and internalize the geometric, architectural concepts of the most successful violins you can get access to. That and careful material selection is where the rubber meets the road in terms of acoustics and performance. Become a setup master. Everything else, make it your own. You're not just a craftsperson, you are a sculptor. 

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3 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

Given the speed of technological advances, and the formulation of new materials, it seems we could be one of the last generations to experience violins in their traditional guise.
Your Tardis might only have a short trip.

Speaking of...I wonder if gene editing science can make seeds that only grow figured maple?  Sort of cool to imagine a project for future preservation of materials.  I'm thinking like Jurassic Park....but just a bunch of curly maple trees.

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48 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

My take - you'd be silly not to study and internalize the geometric, architectural concepts of the most successful violins you can get access to.

If success is measured by numbers built, sold, and still being played, you need to learn the nuances of built-on-back "Saxons".   ;)  :lol:

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1 hour ago, Matthew Hannafin said:

Speaking of...I wonder if gene editing science can make seeds that only grow figured maple?  Sort of cool to imagine a project for future preservation of materials.  I'm thinking like Jurassic Park....but just a bunch of curly maple trees.

I'm sure eventually it will be understood why this happens, and how to manipulate it.
By then, violins might not even be made from solid wood, it didn't take long for classical guitars tops to routinely be made from a honeycomb synthetic material (which I think was taken from fire doors?), with veneers over to give a traditional look.

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59 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

I'm sure eventually it will be understood why this happens, and how to manipulate it.
By then, violins might not even be made from solid wood, it didn't take long for classical guitars tops to routinely be made from a honeycomb synthetic material (which I think was taken from fire doors?), with veneers over to give a traditional look.

I get that...guitarists have been hoping to play unplugged to the same crowds an unplugged violin can.  So volume gets valued really high.

The funny part is...electric guitarists still covet the old out dated temperamental guitars...and amps with tubes too.

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