Violin.. Any value more then a cup of coffee??


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More of the 'usual'.  Not worth a great deal from a market value point of view, but certainly has value as a player, if it's set up properly and sounds well.

Worth more than cup of coffee certainly.

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Hah!  I was quick on the draw! ^_^

It's a perfectly nice looking instrument.  Mismatched pegs, which I wouldn't worry about if they fit well.

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55 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

My question was a round-about way of asking if there is a label inside.

No label, previous owner said it was handmade in 1920,German. But I would like to know for sure... Any identifying components? 

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29 minutes ago, Rachell66 said:

No label, previous owner said it was handmade in 1920,German. But I would like to know for sure... Any identifying components? 

What Rue and I said, "the usual", is short for a Jacobism, "the usual rubbish", which means a "Saxon" style German trade violin from the Markneukirchen-Schönbach area.  I also coined the term "Markie" to refer to these.  Millions of them were produced in a cottage-piecework system known as "Dutzendarbeit", and assembled and sold internationally by wholesalers during the period 1870-1925, more or less.  They are the most common form of antique violin. 

They were imported into the USA and sold by mail-order retailers like Sears, used as raw material by makers elsewhere, and relabled by a variety of retailers worldwide.  Asking who made one is often an impossible question to answer.

Because they were made in various grades of quality, what they are worth is usually a matter of how each one sounds, and what condition it is in.  :)

 

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4 hours ago, Violadamore said:

What Rue and I said, "the usual", is short for a Jacobism, "the usual rubbish", which means a "Saxon" style German trade violin from the Markneukirchen-Schönbach area.  I also coined the term "Markie" to refer to these

When did you coin the Term "Markie"?

 

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It’s a nice looking violin, in good shape, and appears well made of pretty wood. If it were for sale in this area and sounds good, it would sell reasonably quickly, and for a reasonable amount, so don’t fret that we have no idea which Hans Schmidt made it. The bow is also entirely acceptable and is better than the carbon fiber crap inflicted on most school kids(ironically, that CF garbage is stamped K.Holtz, and Holtz is the German word for “wood”)

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37 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

They teach you very old fashioned German spelling in Texas:D

Well, my teacher was born in 1928 and immigrated to the US in 1957, so possibly.

What is the better spelling?

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Hi 

2 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

It’s a nice looking violin, in good shape, and appears well made of pretty wood. If it were for sale in this area and sounds good, it would sell reasonably quickly, and for a reasonable amount, so don’t fret that we have no idea which Hans Schmidt made it. The bow is also entirely acceptable and is better than the carbon fiber crap inflicted on most school kids(ironically, that CF garbage is stamped K.Holtz, and Holtz is the German word for “wood”)

So i went to pick up the violin and it looks even better than in the photos. The arch isn't visible either. When i saw it.. I was like.... Come to mama!! It needs a tiny bit of glueing at the seams. Just.. My luthier said the bow wasn't worth rehairing?? Do you think it is? 

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14 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Years ago.  :D

Me-thinks it would be more correct to say that you strongly helped popularize the term "markie", as its origin seems to predate  your  presence here. :)

It would appear that the earliest known use on this forum of "markie"  can be attributed to Jacob from South Africa in 2004.

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/search/&q=markie&page=17&search_and_or=or&sortby=relevancy

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2 hours ago, Delabo said:

Me-thinks it would be more correct to say that you strongly helped popularize the term "markie", as its origin seems to predate  your  presence here. :)

It would appear that the earliest known use on this forum of "markie"  can be attributed to Jacob from South Africa in 2004.

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/search/&q=markie&page=17&search_and_or=or&sortby=relevancy

Gee, you went to a lot of trouble to sort that out.  We've never had a shortage of OCD on MN, but your effort deserves special recognition.  ;)

On 9/4/2004 at 2:08 AM, Jacob said:

I'd love to own a Stainer (a real one, that is), but I don't. I'm planning to make a Baroque copy real soon though.

Your Markie: as has been mentioned, the fluting on the f-hole wings; the edges and channeling, especially at the corners; the outline of the head (are those original tool marks?); the pin under the back button; the neck, which looks quite user-friendly; the outline.

Not unique, just not average German trade.

Attention @jacobsaunders!!!   You may now stop blaming me for the term "Markie".  @Delabo has proved, with his list, that it was used on MN for 8 years before I joined here.  :P:lol:

 

 

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