difference between LN 101, 102, 103 block planes?


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On 3/3/2021 at 1:24 PM, Wood Butcher said:

You know the law of internet purchases, it's too much faff to send it back, so it just gets kept, and moaned about at every opportunity ;)

You need to stop with the ad hominems WB.

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On 3/3/2021 at 4:26 AM, Wood Butcher said:

A good plane matters, however without being able to sharpen a blade properly, and set the blade correctly, any advantages one plane has over another will be negated.

 

Indeed.  As opposed to the block plane, I went the cheap $7 for a whole set of chisels from Harbor Freight.  I tried to sharpen them freehand.  It was a great experience.

My honing guide is on the way....

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6 hours ago, sospiri said:

I had already flattened the sole.

Isn't this the problem with castings, they are never perfect?

They can be pretty stable if they are cooled properly, and stress-relieved prior to machining. Another issue can arise if they aren't clamped properly during machining.

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1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

They can be pretty stable if they are cooled properly, and stress-relieved prior to machining. Another issue can arise if they aren't clamped properly during machining.

With the pin not being level, should I drill it out and replace it with a thicker pin?

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10 hours ago, JesseBrano said:

wuhoo, my plane was shipped today! (should I say wahoo because I'm from Cleveland?)

With it being a new plane, it's worth greasing the screws and adjusters when you get it, if they haven't been done.
Use grease rather than oil, and be sparing. You don't want any of that getting onto the wood. Ever.

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12 hours ago, sospiri said:

With the pin not being level, should I drill it out and replace it with a thicker pin?

 I cannot see what you're talking about from here..., but if it were mine I think I would alter the existing one rather than try to remove and replace it, especially if the sides of the plane are not parallel.  Altering the location of holes accurately isn't very easy to do.
And by alter I mean file (or grind if it's too hard) the contact surface of the pin to be parallel to the blade bed surface and mouth of the plane.  It would also be a good idea to check and question the accuracy of the iron cap, and everything else...

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4 hours ago, JesseBrano said:

@Wood Butcher I'm such a noob.  What kind of grease?

I'm very much a fan of mechanical things working well and smoothly, but greasing an adjuster or mechanism on a wood working plane isn't anything I've ever done or would do.  I might polish a screw if it were rough, but that's it.  I've yet to wear out any part of a plane due to lack of lubrication.

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4 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

I'm very much a fan of mechanical things working well and smoothly, but greasing an adjuster or mechanism on a wood working plane isn't anything I've ever done or would do.  I might polish a screw if it were rough, but that's it.  I've yet to wear out any part of a plane due to lack of lubrication.

It's not about things wearing out, more that they turn smoothly, and are easier to adjust. On a new plane the tolerances can be very tight, sometimes screws can feel stiff or graunchy.
On any used plane, a bit of wear has occurred, and often things run better then.

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5 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

I'm very much a fan of mechanical things working well and smoothly, but greasing an adjuster or mechanism on a wood working plane isn't anything I've ever done or would do.  I might polish a screw if it were rough, but that's it.  I've yet to wear out any part of a plane due to lack of lubrication.

Same here. In fact, I'm so much of a freak about keeping greases, oils and waxes off bare wood, that I used tung oil (which dries) as the rust retardant on the surface of my table saw, rather than using an oil or wax.

Oh that reminds me, a mechanical engineer friend of mine sprayed linseed oil on the undercarriage of his car as a rust retardant. His idea, not mine. :D

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9 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Same here. In fact, I'm so much of a freak about keeping greases, oils and waxes off bare wood, that I used tung oil (which dries) as the rust retardant on the surface of my table saw, rather than using an oil or wax.

Oh that reminds me, a mechanical engineer friend of mine sprayed linseed oil on the undercarriage of his car as a rust retardant. His idea, not mine. :D

Well...... what happened?

 

 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, sospiri said:

Well...... what happened?

It gave his Japanese car an Italian sound.

Just kidding. I guess his father (also a mechanical engineer) has been using it for years, with good results. Pretty good at penetrating existing rust, prior to drying.

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5 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

It gave his Japanese car an Italian sound.

Just kidding. I guess his father (also a mechanical engineer) has been using it for years, with good results. Pretty good at penetrating existing rust, prior to drying.

So it does have magical properties?

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On 3/5/2021 at 10:19 AM, David Burgess said:

Which pin is that?

The bar that holds the blade in place.

22 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

 I cannot see what you're talking about from here..., but if it were mine I think I would alter the existing one rather than try to remove and replace it, especially if the sides of the plane are not parallel.  Altering the location of holes accurately isn't very easy to do.
And by alter I mean file (or grind if it's too hard) the contact surface of the pin to be parallel to the blade bed surface and mouth of the plane.  It would also be a good idea to check and question the accuracy of the iron cap, and everything else...

I wonder if I can attach a tube to it with a slot filled with epoxy?

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2 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

It's not about things wearing out, more that they turn smoothly, and are easier to adjust. On a new plane the tolerances can be very tight, sometimes screws can feel stiff or graunchy.
On any used plane, a bit of wear has occurred, and often things run better then.

Agreed, which is why I mentioned polishing screws.  It’s easy to do, think of it as premature wear, and improves feel and function without the risk.

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2 hours ago, sospiri said:

I wonder if I can attach a tube to it with a slot filled with epoxy?

Only if there's enough space for it.  I know that on my LN 102s the blade cap will just go under the pin.  I don't know if that would be a good long term solution.  Perhaps just a section of brass tube or shim stock and then file to suit.  Or..., file the blade cap a bit.  That said, I'm just guessing absent a good picture or better description of what you're dealign with.  

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On 3/1/2021 at 7:02 PM, Mark Norfleet said:

This violin maker/restorer has 2 of the 102 and I find them quite comfortable and easy to use.  One is modified and is used on fingerboards only.

Mark, I've read this from multiple sources where the dedicated fingerboard plane is slightly rounded. Can you describe how much convexity you put on the sole. A picture with the sole against a straight edge might be the simplest explanation.

Thanks,

Jim

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4 hours ago, sospiri said:

The bar that holds the blade in place.

I wonder if I can attach a tube to it with a slot filled with epoxy?

Are you sure you can’t get a refund or exchange for this fault? I’d say that the fact that you’ve flattened the sole is irrelevant. If the pin isn’t straight, it’s a defective product, which should be the supplier’s/manufacturer’s problem, not yours.

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1 hour ago, Jim Bress said:

Mark, I've read this from multiple sources where the dedicated fingerboard plane is slightly rounded. Can you describe how much convexity you put on the sole. A picture with the sole against a straight edge might be the simplest explanation.

Thanks,

Jim

In the first picture there are three layers of paper under the scale at the back end of the plane and one in the front.  The blade has not been retracted from the last time I used it.  I always sharpen the blade before the final VERY fine cuts and use very little pressure while planing so the fingerboard isn’t distorted.

The paper is conveniently .1 mm thick. 
 

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