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Ooh, bridgeshome is going all Red-Violin-super-science-lab on us now.  You have to wear a white coat and speak in hushed tones when you do this, BH.  There has to be an oscilloscope running in the background, and lots of purple and blue lights.  And if Samuel L. Jackson comes into the room, the scene shifts from the Red Violin to Pulp Fiction, and... yeah... Where's @Violadamore when you need her to sweep in here, katana flashing...:ph34r:

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1 hour ago, palousian said:

Ooh, bridgeshome is going all Red-Violin-super-science-lab on us now.  You have to wear a white coat and speak in hushed tones when you do this, BH.  There has to be an oscilloscope running in the background, and lots of purple and blue lights.  And if Samuel L. Jackson comes into the room, the scene shifts from the Red Violin to Pulp Fiction, and... yeah... Where's @Violadamore when you need her to sweep in here, katana flashing...:ph34r:

This is the way.

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2 hours ago, palousian said:

Ooh, bridgeshome is going all Red-Violin-super-science-lab on us now.  You have to wear a white coat and speak in hushed tones when you do this, BH.  There has to be an oscilloscope running in the background, and lots of purple and blue lights.  And if Samuel L. Jackson comes into the room, the scene shifts from the Red Violin to Pulp Fiction, and... yeah... Where's @Violadamore when you need her to sweep in here, katana flashing...:ph34r:

Not Pulp Fiction, and you'd be surprised what can be hidden under a lab coat...........   :lol:

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3 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Be very careful. F-wings and wing tips can break easily. Best to use the endpin hole.

Unfortunately, borescopes of the particularly cheap variety may be too large to fit through the endpin hole. That is what I discovered anyway when I succumbed to the urge to take a gander at the innards of my violin with the very cheap borescope I have. Since the subject has come up here, I am going to also succumb to the urge to post some of the resulting images. I am 99% sure that the violin I went poking around in is the usual Dutzenarbeit. I would be very interested to know whether these images remove all doubt or call into question that origin story. Also, is the label pictured a repair label? The instrument also has a fake Stradivarius (1727 supposedly) label.

 

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13 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Not Pulp Fiction, and you'd be surprised what can be hidden under a lab coat...........   :lol:

I do wish someone had taken the time to show Uma how to hold a katana.  It's not a baseball bat, folks!

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8 hours ago, palousian said:

I do wish someone had taken the time to show Uma how to hold a katana.  It's not a baseball bat, folks!

Wasn't going to say anything, but her form sucked throughout that amusing dog of a movie.  Did you know that Carradine never really knew any Kung Fu, either?  He faked it throughout the TV series with ballet moves and a little coaching.  :lol:

I don't know of any kata that matches her stance in that pic, but I liked her facial expression.  :)

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6 hours ago, gottawonder said:

Unfortunately, borescopes of the particularly cheap variety may be too large to fit through the endpin hole. That is what I discovered anyway when I succumbed to the urge to take a gander at the innards of my violin with the very cheap borescope I have. Since the subject has come up here, I am going to also succumb to the urge to post some of the resulting images. I am 99% sure that the violin I went poking around in is the usual Dutzenarbeit. I would be very interested to know whether these images remove all doubt or call into question that origin story. Also, is the label pictured a repair label? The instrument also has a fake Stradivarius (1727 supposedly) label.

 

_PIC0000_lowercorner.jpg

_PIC0002_lining.jpg

_PIC0003_bottomblock.jpg

_PIC0004_topblock.jpg

_PIC0006_uppercorner.jpg

_PIC0007_bassbar.jpg

_PIC0015_bassbar.jpg

_PIC0016_label.jpg

IMHO, that's what a middling grade of Markie looks like inside.  Carl Ruckmich, though often given as a maker by dealers and auctioneers, owned a music shop in Freiburg. Jacob might know more about the firm.  Ordinarily, I'd consider that an inserted retailer's label, but the "R" could stand for "repariert", making it a repair label.

Impressive dust-bunny.  :lol:

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6 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Impressive dust-bunny.  :lol:

I know! I was half convinced it was alive for a second before I got my wits about me and realized that all the movement was due to my inability to stabilize the camera holding it delicately in the f-hole. Not sure how best to get that bunny out of there; I assume that would be advisable?

 

6 hours ago, Violadamore said:

IMHO, that's what a middling grade of Markie looks like inside. 

OK then. I'm good with that. I'm just glad to hear that it doesn't look like a terrible quality Markie. 

 

6 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Carl Ruckmich... owned a music shop in Freiburg.

It's really sentimental attachment to Freiburg that led me to pick up this particular violin. Not a good reason to put any money into an instrument; fortunately it wasn't a great deal of money.

Thanks for the response.

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41 minutes ago, gottawonder said:

I know! I was half convinced it was alive for a second before I got my wits about me and realized that all the movement was due to my inability to stabilize the camera holding it delicately in the f-hole. Not sure how

You're welcome!

You might get lucky sucking it out the F-hole with a shop vac.  You more likely will have to take a busted string with the wrap spiral undone a little ways, to snag the thing, and drag it back to the F-hole to grab it carefully with very fine tweezers and pull it out.  :)

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1 hour ago, Violadamore said:

You might get lucky sucking it out the F-hole with a shop vac.

Fortunately for me, I don't have a shop vac; a mediocre Markie doesn't deserve what I might get up to around it with a shop vac. I'll either give the clever string trick a go or say live and let live, bunny.

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3 hours ago, bridgeshome said:

Hope these provide some helpful direction on the ID front.

Nice picts. One piece bottom rib and linings that go across the block, I am beginning to think like @jacobsaunders "Mirecourt, first half of 19th C."

I am also suspicious that the scroll is not original.

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On 3/3/2021 at 7:06 PM, palousian said:

Ooh, bridgeshome is going all Red-Violin-super-science-lab on us now.  You have to wear a white coat and speak in hushed tones when you do this, BH.  There has to be an oscilloscope running in the background, and lots of purple and blue lights.  And if Samuel L. Jackson comes into the room, the scene shifts from the Red Violin to Pulp Fiction, and... yeah... Where's @Violadamore when you need her to sweep in here, katana flashing...:ph34r:

That whole scene just kills me... after having the obligatory whisky shots, Morritz asks what the luthier would do with it and he says, take it apart, take individual readings on the plates.  Shock and gasp!  Morritz says  "I don't think you get it".  It's just really funny to me, as we all know fiddles are made to take apart.  I do like how Sam captured the "completely fiddle obsessed" character.  

Also, whether Uma held the Katana properly or not, I'm still impressed. I love those movies.  As Count Rugen says, I have an overdeveloped sense of vengeance and it will probably get me into trouble some day :lol:

 

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On 3/3/2021 at 7:42 AM, Blank face said:

 So the OP could take a closer look reg. the rib/bottom attachment and the inside work, wood of blocks and linings and the form of the blocks, if they are symmetrical or longer at the C bouts or outer ribs. Is there a pin or a hole in the upper block from a former nail, or a plateau pointing to a through neck?

I’m interested to hear whether the internal pics posted on 3/6 address the above. Thanks.

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8 hours ago, Violadamore said:

IMHO, outside mold.  The points for French are starting to accumulate.  :)

Nonsense. The rib joints are pinched together and, as mentioned before, possibly let into a groove at the bottom, what all excludes outside mould. Furthermore the outside mould appears regulary roughly in the mid of the 19th century in French/Mirecourt making, while this is older. All this facts were pointed out several times before in other discussions, Other French features are missing (s. next post).

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2 hours ago, bridgeshome said:

I’m interested to hear whether the internal pics posted on 3/6 address the above. Thanks.

Thanks for the new photos.

First thing is that the linings look in this picture like later additions. The wood is brighter, the woodwork looks more rough and irregular and there are these knife marks pointing to an amateurish/autodidactical repairer who had not bending iron to give them the correct form. It's also possible that the upper block (no pin) and symetrical corner blocks were replacements, or that the instrument had no such blocks at all in the beginning. There's no plateau for a former through neck visible, but this could have been planed away.

Features of an old French construction could be corner blocks being longer in the C bouts and cleats at the bottom joint, which are both missing.

At the photo I showe in the post above there seems to be a shallow groove for the ribs visible at the end of the bottom corner (left side). Can you confirm this, or is it just a trick of the photo?

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3 hours ago, Blank face said:

Thanks for the new photos.

First thing is that the linings look in this picture like later additions. The wood is brighter, the woodwork looks more rough and irregular and there are these knife marks pointing to an amateurish/autodidactical repairer who had not bending iron to give them the correct form. It's also possible that the upper block (no pin) and symetrical corner blocks were replacements, or that the instrument had no such blocks at all in the beginning. There's no plateau for a former through neck visible, but this could have been planed away.

Features of an old French construction could be corner blocks being longer in the C bouts and cleats at the bottom joint, which are both missing.

At the photo I showe in the post above there seems to be a shallow groove for the ribs visible at the end of the bottom corner (left side). Can you confirm this, or is it just a trick of the photo?

Interesting observations, as usual.

It looks to me like sections of the linings are replaced, but others look to match to age of the rest of the interior. Perhaps the sections going across the corner blocks were later additions? 

Do you think that those rib joins are unambiguously pinched (BoB) construction? The one-piece bottom rib is somewhat unusual for that.

Do you see any evidence that the current symmetrical blocks were replacements for original asymmetrical blocks?

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