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7 hours ago, Ratcliffiddles said:

With that style of corners and rib mitres, it looks ordinary Bohemian to me second half 19th century

Agreed

3 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

A quick look through pre-1920 Lyon and Healy Catalogs showed prices for Stradivari violins ranged from $6,000 to $15,000.

In 1931, a $500 insurance replacement value for a good early 19th century French violin would be perfectly reasonable.

@bridgeshome

Nobody was taking advantage of Aunt Minnie, and she was smart to insure that violin. 

They saw her coming.

 

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B.home,

I'm following with interest, as those who actually know this stuff reveal the secrets.  I confess wanting to see what a dendro would reveal...  But, the heel image reveals to my untrained eyes that the rib bottom edge is beneath the top--that is, in a groove.  The corner shots indicate that as well, don't they?  Linings over the blocks...

So, to the experts I wonder--did the French also use one-piece bottom ribs?  And I would say, B. Home, that you need to get thee to a luthiery and get this lovely violin in shape and set up!  Thank you for not being "the usual."

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12 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

A quick look through pre-1920 Lyon and Healy Catalogs showed prices for Stradivari violins ranged from $6,000 to $15,000.

In 1931, a $500 insurance replacement value for a good early 19th century French violin would be perfectly reasonable.

@bridgeshome

Nobody was taking advantage of Aunt Minnie, and she was smart to insure that violin. 

there was something called the great depression after your figures.

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16 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

evidence, google has nothing??? And I wasn't referring to the highest priced examples but rather the most affordable.

You're the one who made the claim that you could by a Strad for $500 in 1931. Prove it yourself. 

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Bruce is very experienced so I also would love to know what he is seeing that indicate the ribs are in the back.

On the PRO side is the rib end view which might show this, but the OP has cropped the picture, so its not possible to be sure.

On the NO side is the picture that  shows the ribs at different distances from the edge which would be a very unprofessional way to cut a groove.

 

ribs in back corner .jpeg

ribs in the back.jpeg

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3 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

If you look at the other pics, it's clear that the ribs are not set into any groove. This might help:

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The view that you show would only be of any help if the grooves continued right to the end.  But I think that some better workers were careful not to continue the groove all the way though before it reaches the end. So how does this picture help  if the school is one of the latter ?

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8 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Because there is a clear gap between the bottom of the rib and the back.

Sorry, I am not seeing it ?

I can see the gap along the top but not the back ?

 

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5 hours ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

there was something called the great depression after your figures.

I find it difficult to believe one could have bought a Strad in 1930 for $500.  Reason I say this is because I thought I saw instrument catalogues from the 1920s through 1940s that list workshop violins for that much.  I could be wrong.  Do you have any historical facts that back this up?  $500 for a Strad? Questionable.

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3 minutes ago, violinnewb said:

I find it difficult to believe one could have bought a Strad in 1930 for $500.  Reason I say this is because I thought I saw instrument catalogues from the 1920s through 1940s that list workshop violins for that much.  I could be wrong.  Do you have any historical facts that back this up?  $500 for a Strad? Questionable.

Maybe I was a few years too late for those prices, but the point is $500 is a huge amount for a violin in 1931, and this violin is barely worth $500 today with 1000% inflation.

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Just now, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Maybe I was a few years too late for those prices, but the point is $500 is a huge amount for a violin in 1931, and this violin is barely worth $500 today with 1000% inflation.

Ok.  That is a fair reply.  I spent 20 minutes looking for 1920s and 1930s Strad prices because, you know, to put on my time travel to do list.

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Just now, violinnewb said:

Ok.  That is a fair reply.  I spent 20 minutes looking for 1920s and 1930s Strad prices because, you know, to put on my time travel to do list.

I looked too, couldn't find any historical Strad prices by google, I know when I started in the business decades ago you could pick up a Strad for low hundred thousands, even though the better ones were worth a million, inflation has taken its toll!!

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4 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Maybe I was a few years too late for those prices, but the point is $500 is a huge amount for a violin in 1931, and this violin is barely worth $500 today with 1000% inflation.

There is no evidence the OP's violin is the same violin that Aunt Minnie had insured for $500 in 1931.

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Additional paperwork without clear evidence like signed photos and archival confirmations are worthless and shouldn't be even considered, also fancy family tales.

Of course Bruce' observation reg. the ribs being let into grooves seems right to me, and the hardwood linings would be unusual for a Saxony or Bohemian violin, too. OTOH I can't see much French in it neither. So the OP could take a closer look reg. the rib/bottom attachment and the inside work, wood of blocks and linings and the form of the blocks, if they are symmetrical or longer at the C bouts or outer ribs. Is there a pin or a hole in the upper block from a former nail, or a plateau pointing to a through neck?

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10 hours ago, Blank face said:

Of course Bruce' observation reg. the ribs being let into grooves seems right to me, and the hardwood linings would be unusual for a Saxony or Bohemian violin, too. OTOH I can't see much French in it neither. So the OP could take a closer look reg. the rib/bottom attachment and the inside work, wood of blocks and linings and the form of the blocks, if they are symmetrical or longer at the C bouts or outer ribs. Is there a pin or a hole in the upper block from a former nail, or a plateau pointing to a through neck?

@Blank faceI have an appointment to meet with an acquaintance on Saturday who has one of these cameras and plan to take several photos of the inside work, as you suggest. I will post them this weekend.

2D1736E7-3FC8-4AE3-864A-2F8141CB0D7C.jpeg

BE1C21BB-BEF8-4924-A9E0-5589A4A73113.jpeg

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