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industrial cello : will aliphatic glue work onto surfaces that were previously glued with (unknown) industrial glue?


Atelier en bois
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Hi there,

as a professional violin maker I sometimes feel uncomfortable when an industrial instrument comes to the bench and needs reglueing.  I'm talking about industrial glue that dries into "plastic-ish" layer. 

I usually cut chips of this old glue to test for hot water dissolution, but most often I get no happy surprise : plastic-ish, indeed!  So after having mechanically removed the glue I glue it back, usually with aliphatic glue (not to mention a very famous brand name :-))  I wouldn't dare to use my good old hide glue, as I tend to consider that the wood has been sealed with the old industrial glue, preventing the hide glue to "bind" to the wood, and there is also the problem of poor contact induced by roughly fitted surfaces.

This time I have this problem again, the old glue is transparent, has no colour and is brittle,  and what is needed is to glue the neck back into the body, and I'm a bit scared because of the high constraint...

... would someone share with me some knowledge, some experience in this general matter?  It could be easy to refuse to do such "indus" work, but I like the idea of helping everybody, discrimination based on glue type is not an option!

Thank you very much.

Arnaud

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2 hours ago, Atelier en bois said:

...I wouldn't dare to use my good old hide glue, as I tend to consider that the wood has been sealed with the old industrial glue, preventing the hide glue to "bind" to the wood...

I'm not sure that this is a valid concern, because hide glue adheres strongly to completely non-porous substances such as glass.

 

2 hours ago, Atelier en bois said:

..there is also the problem of poor contact induced by roughly fitted surfaces....

This is a valid concern, because hide glue is not a good gap filler.

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The ability of hide to adhere surfaces has more to do with polarity than porosity - it is an electrochemical bond, not a physical bond. In a sense it is actually the water in the gelatin matrix that serves as the adhesive rather than the gelatin itself. Hide doesn't stick to dried aliphatic resin or pva glues because of their polarity.

On an inexpensive factory instrument with a badly fitted neck, I'd consider epoxy. 

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