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33 minutes ago, Delabo said:

It at least shows that this style of f-hole was known in Scotland in the 16th century.

It also is showing that 16th century scottish people had very small heads and extremely long necks, while their arms and hands were thick, long and very broad.

Or alternatively it shows absolutely nothing one should rely on.;)

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11 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

Yes, my ancestors come from Scotland, so it’s no surprise that it’s rotten with Saunders’s there:)

Some of us will admit our ancestry is Scottish. MY father's birth surname was McClintic which was changed to Knight after a family, ahem, disagreement.

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1 hour ago, Blank face said:

It also is showing that 16th century scottish people had very small heads and extremely long necks, while their arms and hands were thick, long and very broad.

Or alternatively it shows absolutely nothing one should rely on.;)

Are your referring to the man in the picture David Rizzio ?

He was Italian, not Scottish. He came from Italy to live in Scotland.

 

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3 hours ago, Delabo said:

Are your referring to the man in the picture David Rizzio ?

He was Italian, not Scottish. He came from Italy to live in Scotland.

 

Just because he came from Italy doesn't mean that he was able to paint a person with right body dimensions nor violins with realistic f holes.

The same applies to the schematic scratch from "the French book" (whatever this is).

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13 minutes ago, Blank face said:

Just because he came from Italy doesn't mean that he was able to paint a person with right body dimensions nor violins with realistic f holes.

The same applies to the schematic scratch from "the French book" (whatever this is).

Should have given the title. Marin Mersenne's Harmonicorum Instrumentorum, Paris, 1636. It is from Ben Hebbert's Violin making in Northern Europe in the time of the Amatis: Part 2. I was researching English violins of the 17th Century when the article came up. I has thinking some amateur with only a drawing made the instrument. I know it was common to find 19th and early 20th c American violins made from books with drawings. I had at one time a few American violins with the book's drawings they were copied from. Many features were exaggerated. Huge c-bout square corners--13mm wide, etc.

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