Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Long arches


Owen Morse-Brown
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 113
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

8 hours ago, David Beard said:

"some"

You also can't rule out that they ALL might have worked under the shared common notion that the top long arcs should be carved differently than backs in basically exactly the way we see them today.

 

We most certainly can rule out that top long arcs were originally carved in "basically exactly" the way we see them today, with the hypothetical exceptions of an instrument which has never been strung up, or a "solid body" instrument.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

Leaving aside for a moment distortions or intentions, are we really sure that a flattish top long arch is better than a curved one?

This guy seemed to have come to think otherwise.

1811668386_IHSCariplo1744seste.thumb.jpg.dbcd8083bac05d5142e827b1236cd7fb.jpg

Breaking the rules? Love this guy.:)

The arching on that top does look like it would be unusually resistant to the typical long-arch distortion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, David Beard said:

"some"

You also can't rule out that they ALL might have worked under the shared common notion that the top long arcs should be carved differently than backs in basically exactly the way we see them today.

 

Funny that you ignored my post with the quote which was actually from the time and place that some of these makers were still active.

You also need to show why, if they really made the top more flat, that there's any advantage of doing so. The most sought after instruments as far as I'm aware, are rather more curved than not.

1 hour ago, Davide Sora said:

Leaving aside for a moment distortions or intentions, are we really sure that a flattish top long arch is better than a curved one?

This guy seemed to have come to think otherwise.

1811668386_IHSCariplo1744seste.thumb.jpg.dbcd8083bac05d5142e827b1236cd7fb.jpg

Breaking the rules? Love this guy.:)

A case in point. Del Gesu made rather thick plates that keeps the shape well. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

Leaving aside for a moment distortions or intentions, are we really sure that a flattish top long arch is better than a curved one?

This guy seemed to have come to think otherwise.

1811668386_IHSCariplo1744seste.thumb.jpg.dbcd8083bac05d5142e827b1236cd7fb.jpg

Breaking the rules? Love this guy.:)

This is just an example of the shorter flattish stretch.  This is not at all unique to Del Gesu.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Torbjörn Zethelius said:

Thicknesses aren't as important as the curvatures. Make them thin or thick, I don't care. 

I agree, I recently made a stainer based instrument, the original top  arching is not as flat as many others are, and the thicknessing is very different. Around 4.5mm in the centre reducing towards the edges - much more like a back would normally be. From my limited experience, the sound is very good and Stainer instruments used to be more highly prized than Strads! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems clear to me that past makers have experimented with all sorts of top archings.

Christian Pedersen said that higher arching examples tended to buckle most. I can't disagree with that. But did Stainer's violins distort? And, if not why not?

I think earlier higher arching went out of fashion and many makers chose instead to adopt the flattened curve version. And, taken to the extreme, we see examples where the arching bulges towards the end blocks, especially in the upper bout. When that particular shape also has some sinking forward of the bridge it looks like compression distortion. Supposedly.

Perhaps some makers in the past used the flattened low top with bulging areas to match the air volume of higher arched instruments.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...