Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

The arthritic luthier


Jluthier
 Share

Recommended Posts

One thing I admire about the Cremona luthiers is how they continued their craft to such an advanced age, and I admire all of you can who complete an instrument without ever plugging anything in.  My own hands are slowly suffering from years of overuse here and there, so I will admit to employing power tools when it comes time for rough removal of wood.  The oscillating multi-tool has promise for being a good rasp-like device, but I have found that the commercial velcro sanding pads disintegrate after only a short while, and, even if they stood up to rasping, would be useful for only the roughest of work.  My solutions are pictured here.  The larger sanding pads are modified by first epoxy gluing on a sheet of aluminum over the velcro surface, then using the spray contact cement to reversibly attach sanding paper to the aluminum sheet.  For finer rasp work, such as the throat of the rough scroll I just cut out, I used an old saw blade that I bent into a curve and then directly wrapped #80 sandpaper around it with contact cement.  Both of these configurations have held up well.  

I still sacrifice my hand joints for hand purfling, chiseling, scraping, etc.    98077475_multtoolsander.thumb.jpg.7e32c067e2e95669aeb378ef4c51a1aa.jpg 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had some tendonitis, and both shoulders frozen some years ago, and a trigger finger (right hand thumb) that needed surgery. And, yes, i had to change somethings. The squirrel tail small planes are less hard on our fingers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With multiple fractures and carpal tunnel surgery on both wrists... and age... I'm definitely in the arthritic luthier category.  Sanding has never been a major process in my making, so I have had no need to mechanize that... other than using a spindle sander and fixture to thickness ribstock  Hand-cutting purfling channels is something I have avoided since day 1, first with a minimill used as an overarm pin router, and now with CNC.

The other big item is carving off large volumes of wood.  For non-CNC tasks, I use shoulder or chest to apply the main force, with hands used only as guides.  Handle extensions and pads are necessary for that.  Even for very light-duty gouge work, I will use the wrist offloading method (or CNC) if I can .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Don Noon said:

With multiple fractures and carpal tunnel surgery on both wrists... and age... I'm definitely in the arthritic luthier category.  Sanding has never been a major process in my making, so I have had no need to mechanize that... other than using a spindle sander and fixture to thickness ribstock  Hand-cutting purfling channels is something I have avoided since day 1, first with a minimill used as an overarm pin router, and now with CNC.

The other big item is carving off large volumes of wood.  For non-CNC tasks, I use shoulder or chest to apply the main force, with hands used only as guides.  Handle extensions and pads are necessary for that.  Even for very light-duty gouge work, I will use the wrist offloading method (or CNC) if I can .

I use my hip to do most of the pushing when I rough gouge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...