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On ebay - reputable sellers(?)


Rehek
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You remind me of a girl from Mecklenburg-Vorpommen who worked for me once. At the beginning I told he absolutely exactly how I wanted her to cut a bridge, and she did just what I said and made a splendid job of it. I was most impressed, and went to find her two much nicer violins to do next. I said to her, “one is from Mittenwald, and the other one from Markneukirchen, would you like me to explain how one can tell the difference?”. She answered “No, I couldn’t give a fig where they come from”. I was speechless for several seconds, and then asked “what are you interested in then?”. She answered “Palaeontology”. I don’t think I ever quite recovered from that discusion

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20 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

You remind me of a girl from Mecklenburg-Vorpommen who worked for me once. At the beginning I told he absolutely exactly how I wanted her to cut a bridge, and she did just what I said and made a splendid job of it. I was most impressed, and went to find her two much nicer violins to do next. I said to her, “one is from Mittenwald, and the other one from Markneukirchen, would you like me to explain how one can tell the difference?”. She answered “No, I couldn’t give a fig where they come from”. I was speechless for several seconds, and then asked “what are you interested in then?”. She answered “Palaeontology”. I don’t think I ever quite recovered from that discusion

Haha, funny story! I am rather shocked that my violin is a Dutzendarbeit though.

But I love how she sounds.. So it's OK. I find it hard to differentiate without seen actual photos, or pointing it out on 2 contrasting violins. And I care a lot, and I am interested to learn. Things I said earlier were I admit out of lack of knowledge. 

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4 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I...........asked “what are you interested in then?”. She answered “Palaeontology”.

[Finishes cleaning a Permian trilobite fossil from a well core, under a magnifier, with fine dental picks.] That's spelled "Paleontology".  Sounds to me like a young woman with fine motor skills, and a proper set of priorities.  ;)  :lol:

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12 minutes ago, Violadamore said:
12 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

That's spelled "Paleontology"

Yes, but since she is German she actually said Paläontologie.

12 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Sounds to me like a young woman with a proper set of priorities.

Had exactly the same thought!

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10 minutes ago, Larry F said:

I spent one summer working on an an archaeological "dig" with some archaeologists and paleontologists  (I did the digging, they did the science) and it is extremely interesting.

I had exactly the same experience, I was highly valued for my rock lifting ability. Did find a trove of musketballs though.

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8 hours ago, Rachell66 said:

Eva pirazzi gold strings, the best bridge, wittner fine tuning pegs, fixed and planed fingerboard.. £800. It was worth every penny. 

Oooo, nice.  It's good to know that I've done over $1200 worth of work on my current performance violin since I got it. :lol:   If you are going to do this, besides learning to recognize "the usual rubbish", as well as other common types offered a lot, you should learn to do an entire set up like that by yourself, along with common crack and neck repair.  The ability to know what you're looking at, and do your own work, is what makes this hobby financially realistic.  Otherwise, you're in danger of doing what everyone's been warning you about.  Congrats on profiting off the £30 Mirecourt.   Jacob may add you to his "spiv siren" list. :)

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I’m sure there will be professional restorers who have been working on fine violins for decades, and are still learning everyday.

The idea that you can just buy some bits, and magically become adept at set-up work, neck resets, fingerboard shaping, peg fitting etc is a total fallacy if you want it to provide any level of satisfaction.

I’m sure those who advocate this, have never had their own work peer reviewed by an actual professional, and are often deluded about their level of work.

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@Rachell66  I wish to make plain, that my reference to "this hobby", above, refers to seriously getting into violin repair and "flipping", like some here get into building, not just playing violin, with repair as a rare adjunct to it.  For primarily playing, depend on your luthier, as many have told you, and be terribly cautious in your purchases.

10 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

I’m sure there will be professional restorers who have been working on fine violins for decades, and are still learning everyday.

The idea that you can just buy some bits, and magically become adept at set-up work, neck resets, fingerboard shaping, peg fitting etc is a total fallacy if you want it to provide any level of satisfaction.

I’m sure those who advocate this, have never had their own work peer reviewed by an actual professional, and are often deluded about their level of work.

There is no magic involved, just serious study and very persistent work, and yes, one learns and improves continually.  I'm not championing anything else.  :)

For the rest of it, I suspect that much of the cattiness here toward autodidacts and part-timers is economic in origin.  :P

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Speeking of ebay seller

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Violin-by-Edmond-Paulus-Markneukirchen-Germany-ca-1930/333872922574?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

Only this guy was more infamous as a buyer, bulldozing everyone over on Roths, Heberleins, Gutters and every other Markie of any quality. Looks like he's selling now though, not a nice as the stuff he/she bought.. Gone are the good buying days on Ebay

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2 minutes ago, deans said:

Speeking of ebay seller

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Violin-by-Edmond-Paulus-Markneukirchen-Germany-ca-1930/333872922574?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

Only this guy was more infamous as a buyer, bulldozing everyone over on Roths, Heberleins, Gutters and every other Markie of any quality with an eldless supply of cash.. Looks like he's selling now though. Gone are the good buying days on Ebay

Yup, and on most of his stuff, I see no value added, either.  I've largely curtailed my fiddle buying on eBay because of the decline in what's available.  Over the last few years, I've shifted primarily to local estate sales.  :)

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4 hours ago, Violadamore said:

For the rest of it, I suspect that much of the cattiness here toward autodidacts and part-timers is economic in origin.  :P

Much of it may also come from seeing the aftermath of horrendous work done by "autodidacts and part-timers" that has aesthetically and/or functionally ruined once good antique violins.

First, do no harm.

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38 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

Does this mean he was consistently the highest bidder?

Yes, used sniping. He wasnt afraid to pay up for good German trade instruments. Just about every Roth at some point, and there was a good number back then. 

Almost a badge of honor to be outbid by him.

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8 hours ago, Violadamore said:

For the rest of it, I suspect that much of the cattiness here toward autodidacts and part-timers is economic in origin.  :P

 

I don't think so. Most who work in the trade, have a deep love of violins, their history and music.

We see it quite often here, don't we? Where someone posts an instrument, which was once very nice, but has been ruined entirely by someone thinking they can repair it, without any of the skills or understanding to do so.
I'm sure the same will apply in other fields, as we saw in the last few years with some art restoration, or building home extensions with no clue, automobile repairs etc.

I can only imagine how frustrating it must be, to run a workshop, where one is presented regularly with this sort of thing, with either recent, or historical repairs so poorly done. All the while knowing, that if it had found its way into the right hands, what ever the issues was, it could have been repaired almost invisibly, thereby saving both the historical interest (perhaps the most important part), and financial value.

It has been said before, and holds a degree of truth that more violins were destroyed by "restorers", than were in accidents.

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