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Meanwhile, back at the ranch, here’s a Finkel w/ query


PhilipKT
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So I kind of also acquired a Finkel. It needed a new faceplate, and the ancient hair replaced, but plays really well. The curious thing is that it doesn’t say “Swiss made” anywhere.

Im quite prepared to be told it’s 08/15(would love the background on that phrase, Jacob)or should be tossed back into the bog, or any other witticisms. Might it be real, and if so, is it “good”? I looked up the Finkel website, but found nothing about “we’re happy to tell you about your bow for X Euros,” but I’m going to write them anyway.

But wanted to share with the eyes here, because, I dunno, we learn even in defeat.

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Edited by PhilipKT
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27 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

In addition to working from his workshop Brienz, Johannes worked in J & A Beare's shop in London, Hans Weishaar's shop in Los Angeles, and Moennig's shop in Philadelphia... 

Thank you for that info. How does it look to you?

better than the Bultitude, one hopes....

Edited by PhilipKT
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C.A, Hoyer in Marknukirchen was the largest Bow workshop in Markneukirchen in the period between the world wars. Most of the bow makers of this period started their career there. After the second world war, Markneukrchen was in the Russian zone, and the Russians confiscated the firm as war reparations. The old Hoyer moved to Switzerland (Brienz) and formed the Schweizerische Bogenbau Aktien Geselschaft. He didn’t live for long though, and his employee Siegfrid Finkel took the firm over. His son Johannes succeeded to the firm in 1974. In the 1960’s people like Hans-Karl Schmidt worked in Brienz for the firm for a while, as did Rudi Neudörfer for some 6 years. The bows from there stamped Neuveville are a play on his name. When I was in Brienz at the end of the 70’s about 8 people worked there, and the whole pallet of bows was made, from the really good down to the “bog standard”. It seemed to me at the time, that Johannes F. spent most of his time, driving around Brienz in his Jeep, being rude to people. The firm was in Schwanden, a subburb of Brienz 45° up the mountain. I believe the firm is now run by Johannes Finkels daughter, and I’m sure she will be happy to tell you about your bow.

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7 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

It followed me home so I kept it.

Louie was a bit surprised.

 

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When our oldest daughter was about 10 years old she found a very similar dog on the street (probably waiting in front of a shop) and it followed her to our home. We fell in shock and awe and it took some hours to restitute it back to the rightful owner.

The moral of the story is, you mustn't take home everything what's saying "Look at me, kid".:unsure:

 

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The bow looks fine - it's a Finkel, which means it's a stolid workshop bow. Don't be thrown by the auction record of $19k for a "viola bow" - that was actually for 13 gold mounted bows from the Moennig liquidation, all unused.

Divide by 13 and you have a fair price for a slightly worn silver mounted cello bow.

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4 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

It seemed to me at the time, that Johannes F. spent most of his time, driving around Brienz in his Jeep, being rude to people.

I think that's a bit unfair. Johannes Finkel was a rather playful, boisterous and outgoing guy, and I can imagine how some might take that as rude, similar to the way some might have taken it as rude when I got on the “tube” in London, stepped into a train car filled with silent people looking crashingly bored, and said “Hi” without having been “properly introduced”. :D

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24 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

I think that's a bit unfair. Johannes Finkel was a rather playful, boisterous and outgoing guy, and I can imagine how some might take that as rude, similar to the way some might have taken it as rude when I got on the “tube” in London, stepped into a train car filled with silent people looking crashingly bored, and said “Hi” without having been “properly introduced”. :D

Yes, I'm sure he would have felt at home in America

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For what it's worth, I spent a decent amount of time with Johannes in the '90s, seeing him London during the auctions, during some of his visits to the states and visiting the workshop in Brienz. I personally never witnessed the "rude" behavior Jacob mentioned... Indeed I found he and his wife to be rather enjoyable company... and from what I could tell he seemed rather well liked in Brienz.

At "the firm" we  also helped carry on the shop's tradition by employing one of his bow makers for a year making bows in our shop. 

Your bow looks fine from what I can see.

 

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5 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Yes, I'm sure he would have felt at home in America

I think he had a ball! After leaving the Weisshaar shop, he set up a bowmaking shop in an RV, and spent some time touring around the US. I'll bet he was the only person in any campground making bows. :lol:

I've had some fantasies about building a shop and living quarters in a maximum-size tractor-trailer rig. :)

How uncouth! :lol:

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5 hours ago, David Burgess said:

I think he had a ball! After leaving the Weisshaar shop, he set up a bowmaking shop in an RV, and spent some time touring around the US. I'll bet he was the only person in any campground making bows. :lol:

I've had some fantasies about building a shop and living quarters in a maximum-size tractor-trailer rig. :)

Cymbal maker Matt Bettis, to the best of my knowledge, still lives in his RV and goes around the most beautiful places in the country making (excellent) cymbals.  Quite a life:

https://www.facebook.com/BettisCymbals/videos/vb.215413568489743/1594020173962402/?type=2&theater

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