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Neck Stain


Richard Pope
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I've seen violins that have a yellow color neck stain, while others have kind of a gray neck stain.  I bought some neck stain from International Violin but it just sealed the wood and didn't change the color or enhance the flames on the neck.  What I'm asking is if I want that gray look on the neck of my violins, what method is used to achieve that.  

Thanks!

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The easiest way I’ve been able to achieve a greenish/grey tint on a neck stain is with tea steeped in alcohol.  It might not be entirely what you are looking for, but it’s an okay starting point. Takes some experimenting to find one that looks right. I found a cheap black decaf tea under my local supermarket’s house brand to deliver want I was looking for.  Sometimes I’ll use it in conjunction with sodium nitrite/tanning regiment 
Neck treatment

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3 hours ago, Richard Pope said:

  What I'm asking is if I want that gray look on the neck of my violins, what method is used to achieve that.  

Thanks!

I once tried with iron acetate, made by dissolving some steel wool in vinegar and diluting a lot with distilled water. The effect was too gray for my taste (I prefer yellow/gray), but it wasn't bad. If the gray of old and dirty necks is what you are looking for, it may be worth a try. Always try on scraps first.

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17 hours ago, Richard Pope said:

I've seen violins that have a yellow color neck stain, while others have kind of a gray neck stain.  I bought some neck stain from International Violin but it just sealed the wood and didn't change the color or enhance the flames on the neck.  What I'm asking is if I want that gray look on the neck of my violins, what method is used to achieve that.  

Thanks!

This question came up some 15 years ago. Here I give the link in which I described a useful method: https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/311643-neck-flame/&tab=comments#comment-316555

Good luck!

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I use a strong tea brew in water. Be sure to sand very fine first then wet with water to raise the grain then sand again. I do this a few times before applying the tea stain. Let it dry then sand lightly and apply the stain again. I typically finish the neck before varnishing. I finish my neck with boiled linseed oil. Wipe it on then off and let it dry a few days then do another coat. 

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This isn't  one-stop shopping, IMO. I always try to bring out over the whole neck the underlying color of the wood under the varnish, while building the bare wood age effect (without dirtiness or abuse) in addition to that so that I don't have the situation of a neck that looks like it came from another instrument.

As a general rule, restorers should avoid developing a uniform personal style, color, approach to their work and applying it to everything that makes it easy to say who did it. The best job looks like nothing has been done. That's my opinion, anyway, and it's why each neck is a different problem.

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2 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

This isn't  one-stop shopping, IMO. I always try to bring out over the whole neck the underlying color of the wood under the varnish, while building the bare wood age effect (without dirtiness or abuse) in addition to that so that I don't have the situation of a neck that looks like it came from another instrument.

As a general rule, restorers should avoid developing a uniform personal style, color, approach to their work and applying it to everything that makes it easy to say who did it. The best job looks like nothing has been done. That's my opinion, anyway, and it's why each neck is a different problem.

Exactly.
Thank you Mr. Darnton.

 

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3 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

As a general rule, restorers should avoid developing a uniform personal style, color, approach to their work and applying it to everything that makes it easy to say who did it. The best job looks like nothing has been done. That's my opinion, anyway, and it's why each neck is a different problem.

Absolutely! Well said. 

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8 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Given the OPs penchant for buying new Chinese violins on ebay with the tell tale white neck, it seems there is some desire to hide the fact that these violins are brand new, and labels we see claim to be older Italian work, it seems that helping the OP disguise his purchases to make them look older might be aiding and abetting?

I do often think about stuff like that.

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Does anyone object when the work and methods of the historic Hill shop can now be sometimes easily identified (including their bows)? Does it devalue the work, or enhance it?

When I see Hill bows that look like Hill bows, that's a good thing. I don't get positive vibes from seeing a Strad with shiny edges characteristically Hill-coated in bulletproof shellac or the characteristic shiny bulletproof patches of retouch that will be there alone forever standing proud until someone scrapes them off. 

What others feel I can't predict.

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Hi You can use 1. JOHA Water stain 428 old golden brown 2. JOHA figerboard oil + pumice 3. Shellac (+ pumice) When the flames are weak or missing, someone uses a weak solution of potassium permanganate, KMnO4. This allows you to make the flame artificially. You can weaken the permanganate solution with a small iron nail so that the oxidation is not so strong.

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