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Tool for painted purfling restoration


Goran74
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Happy new year! 

I have a violin with painted purfling that has wear off a lot, both on top and back plate. 

I could restore it by hand (with small brush) if the problem was smaller. A thing that I did with success at an older restoration. 

I would appreciate if anyone could give me an idea how to make a tool to repaint the purfling. 

Best wishes for 2021! Stay creative, healthy and share nice emotions! 

 

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A fine pointed marker pen works pretty well if you attach to it a distance holder. If the thickness of the marker pen is too wide I would try to adjust it by cutting or sanding the tip. The rest is nerves, concentration and luck. 

Anyway, if it is for the portion on the top pictured above, I think it would look not natural to have a painted purfling on the worn zone.

 

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Thank you a lot for your answers. Since, I decided to do it (and in earlier restorations, if this done properly in some cases it does not seem bad at all) I would like to here more opinions on tools. 

1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

fine pointed marker

Thank you for your suggestion. I have used in the past shellac based medium and black dye, but never ink. 

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One approach would be to paint the purfling on with water colors applied with a fine-pointed brush.  If you didn't like the way it looked, you could wash it off with water.  You could keep trying until it looked right then apply several thin coats of clear varnish over it to seal it in place..

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I would try with 2 wheels at the right thickness + spacers.

Then put little  ink on the wheels

But never did it. Just an idea. Wheels probably in porous material.

It could be also a single wheel , small diameter with a furrow in the middle 

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I've done this and I hold the pen/pencil/brush very close to the tip and use my middle finger as a depth guide on the side of the plate. I find it easier to actually do it in small controlled strokes instead of a sweeping stroke. It may sound counter intuitive, but that's what works for me. 

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