Wang Jintang is the Antonio Stradivari of Zhugou village. 


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A neighbour just sent me a link to an article in the “Global Times”. I suppose one could, whilst one fits up all those rental violins, get a nice warm feeling, thinking of all those that one has rescued from poverty

‘World’s factory of violin’ trains farmers into craftsmen, lifts region out of poverty - Global Times

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Many thanks to Maestro Saunders for posting that article. 

I think this has been posted before on this site, but if not -- and you're interested in cheery upbeat pictures of violin production in China -- check out

I suppose we've all had our own experiences with lower-end Chinese instruments. My sister asked me to do setup on a Stentor violin and a Samuel Eastman viola. There was nothing to be done for the Stentor: the finish was impossibly thick, like they'd repeatedly dipped the poor thing in a vat of polyurethane, completely choking off whatever it had to offer. The finish on the Eastman viola seemed ok, and the instrument seemed pretty well made, but the sound was nasal & poor regardless of what I did re bridge and soundpost. 

On the other hand: I got interested a while ago in octave (aka. baritone) violins. I would up buying a 16&1/4 inch "gamba shaped" viola from Yitamusic and stringing it with Sensicore octave viola strings (except I threw out the low-C and put an E at the top treble, so it's tuned exactly like a violin except an octave down).  The instrument is well made & it really rocks. There's no way it could replace a cello in a string quartet, but I do folk and jazz and am excited about what I might be able to offer my fellow players if this goddam virus goes away & we can start playing again. 

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19 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

A neighbour just sent me a link to an article in the “Global Times”. I suppose one could, whilst one fits up all those rental violins, get a nice warm feeling, thinking of all those that one has rescued from poverty

‘World’s factory of violin’ trains farmers into craftsmen, lifts region out of poverty - Global Times

Repeating 400000 times the same mistake doesn't make anything better. 

:D

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On 12/23/2020 at 4:06 AM, jacobsaunders said:

Yes, I often think that there are to many violins on the planet already, making 400.000 new ones per annum seems bonkers

 

On 12/23/2020 at 3:51 AM, MikeC said:

400,000 output...   :(    

$68,000,000 turnover .... 400,000 units = average $170/instrument WOW

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3 hours ago, mysticpaw said:

$68,000,000 turnover .... 400,000 units = average $170/instrument WOW

You Americans need to get your asses in gear and quit the I'm the heir to Stradivari, look at me business.  You're hobbyist amateurs on the world stage, letting yourself, and yes, your country down.

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1 hour ago, Bill Merkel said:

You Americans need to get your asses in gear and quit the I'm the heir to Stradivari, look at me business.  You're hobbyist amateurs on the world stage, letting yourself, and yes, your country down.

Harsh comment ... uninformed ... I'm not in the the US by the way :(  PS Happy holiday/christmas/whatever to you :)

 

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6 hours ago, mysticpaw said:

Harsh comment ... uninformed ... I'm not in the the US by the way :(  PS Happy holiday/christmas/whatever to you :)

 

Harsh but not uninformed.  Why isn't it our industry instead of theirs?  What if all our best farmers were satisfied with just producing enough for their families? 

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21 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

Harsh but not uninformed.  Why isn't it our industry instead of theirs? 

It is, at the upper end. But there's no money to be made producing a $150 violin where laborers need to be paid much more, and where work comfort and safety requirements are more strict (expensive).

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1 hour ago, Bill Merkel said:

It's as if we produced boutique potatoes that are $50 each and have to rely on China for food, when we could be feeding the world ourselves

It's more the opposite. US farm exports are about $135 billion per year, with China purchasing $13.8 billion of that. 

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