Research Paper: Identification of organic materials in historical stringed instruments


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Greetings, all.

I wonder if anyone has come across this paper? I'm considering purchasing it, but it's not inexpensive at USD40. 

If any of you have this paper, I wonder if you can tell me how well the authors address the matter of added materials, such as repair and touch-up varnishes.

Thanks, all.

Bob

Identification of organic materials in historical stringed instruments by off-line analytical pyrolysis solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0165237019306606

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1 hour ago, Televet said:

Little known fact...If you write directly to the authors they will likely send you a free pdf. 

Very true. Authors don't get paid for publications, often have to pay fees to get published, and pay a lot to allow open access to their articles. I've never written an author and not received a PDF or failed to send a PDF in the reverse case.

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3 minutes ago, Andreas Preuss said:

I am confused by the title.

Organic materials? Basically all components of stringed instruments are organic materials. (Wood, glue and resins) So what does the researcher try to find?

 

Reading the abstract on that link it seems they are trying to identify the various components of varnish in historical instruments.  

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11 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

I am confused by the title.

Organic materials? Basically all components of stringed instruments are organic materials. (Wood, glue and resins) So what does the researcher try to find?

Good question.

If my understanding is correct, the organics will be the resins, dyes, and oils used in the varnish. But it won’t be pigment metals, such as aluminum oxides. Those metallic materials are inorganic, and won't be disclosed by a study of the organic materials.
 

If anyone thinks that’s not correct please correct me - I still have much to learn about all this. 

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Ask your local library to get a copy.  This is a fast and inexpensive way to get a copy.

In my experience, the Abstract always has nuggets of information that tease you into reading the entire paper.  This Abstract does not have that information.  

It is important to note (again) that the varnish film is a historical encyclopedia (that is, a collection) of all the repairs and polishing that has been done  over the centuries.  These studies are disappointing if you are trying to figure out what the maker did.  

regards

Mike D  

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One of the authors had an email address listed so I asked for a copy but still have not gotten a reply so I purchased the PDF.   I can't say it's worth 40 bucks.  I was hoping there would be more identification of coloring components in the varnish.   All instruments showed drying oil.  Shellac was found in some samples.  Propolis was found only in the Guadagnini sample.   Dragons blood in trace amounts on some with a ? mark indicating uncertainty.  

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