Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Do you strop your knives?


Benjamin DeCorsey
 Share

Recommended Posts

So much depends on technique.  Sometimes I have it, sometimes I don't!  

Pocket knife I strop on my pants or a newspaper, in the field.  Helps.  They get set pretty steep, 40 degrees (20 each side) on Arkansas stone with alcohol, left that way, but improvised strops to bring to sharp when needed.

Kitchen knives get the steel, then a stropping motion on a cutting board, very light.  They only need abrasive sharpening if other people use them.  Which happens.  

The shop is another matter.  For utility use, I have a long leather razor strop from long ago, charged with green compound.  And a ca 1900 razor hone / strop for straight razors, stiff.  I level the hone on diamond every once and a while.  The other side is impregnated with something oily and must have some super fine abrasive.  This is the original charge, going strong after 100 years plus!!!  I also have smooth maple with green compound, but I have misplaced it.  And of course, 100 other sharpening things!  No matter what the condition, I can bring a knife up to toasty sharp in short order. 

It's mostly technique. I can't describe, but I'm sure Davide has an incredible video on stropping.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, David Burgess said:

It's never good to strop in the wrong direction. :(

Sage advice.

I glued a square from a leather glove on a board and use it regularly as I'm working. I've got a stick of stuff I rub on the leather but don't remember exactly what it is. I also made an inside strop for the other side of a curved chisel by gluing leather around a dowel. I'm not sure how well that works but no harm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bkwood said:

Sage advice.

I glued a square from a leather glove on a board and use it regularly as I'm working. I've got a stick of stuff I rub on the leather but don't remember exactly what it is. I also made an inside strop for the other side of a curved chisel by gluing leather around a dowel. I'm not sure how well that works but no harm.

The last time I made a strop, I rounded off one of the four edges on the flat piece of wood, and glued the leather around the corner. That convex corner seems to work OK for the inside surface of gouges. One strop rather than two.

I wonder what abrasive compound Norfleet applies to his hand. Or is he a gardener, so the remaining grit impregnated into his hand from the soil suffices? ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...