Glenn Wood violin cases


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Portugal is a wonderful country, and a lot of people from all over Europe consider it for a possible retirement destination. I hope your plans work out, Glenn! Maybe we'll have a chance to sip some wine together looking out at the Douro, or in Paris if you can make it up here again. Mostly, let's cross our fingers that we'll be able to make plans and travel again in the not too distant future!

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7 hours ago, GlennYorkPA said:

Yes, but it's the Portuguese of Brazil rather than Portugal. I picked it up during my years in South America although I must admit my Spanish is better. Spain would be a better 'fit' for me but the tax incentives in Portugal are more enticing. That said, I was in Oporto in January checking out property prices, cost of living etc and it seems everyone spoke English. You must find the same in Germany.

I have always felt that learning a new language is half the fun of moving to a different country. In fact when I first moved to Germany (I’m long since in Austria now). I got annoyed with people who were determined to practice their English on me. Now there are very few people I speak English with, almost all of them native English speakers

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When I go to Germany...everyone speaks English...so I barely get to practice keeping up my German. It's very sad. :(

My German is fine. I'm fluent (albeit lacking a bit in vocabulary) ...but I am rusty...so I need to focus and speak it for a while for it to "come back" and up to speed. 

By then, it's time to return to Canada...:angry:

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16 hours ago, Rue said:

When I go to Germany...everyone speaks English...so I barely get to practice keeping up my German. It's very sad. :(

My German is fine. I'm fluent (albeit lacking a bit in vocabulary) ...but I am rusty...so I need to focus and speak it for a while for it to "come back" and up to speed. 

By then, it's time to return to Canada...:angry:

In Kanada muss man französisch sprechen. Keine Opportunität Deutsch zu üben.

:-)

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It's great to see this collection on line at last! There are some fascinating cases, and I wish I didn't already have a wall of cases filling up my music room...

I got interested in the variety of bow holders. Those ornate French frog and button holders are astonishing. The simple spring clips to hold the bow stick on lot 1016 are shocking!

I was wondering when the spring button holders (lot 1014) started to appear on Hill and other English cases? I've got several with them, and I won't stick any of my valuable bows in those, especially once the protective covering has worn off.

Speaking of bad bow holder ideas, I've got an old French case with spring loaded metal clasps to hold the tip end of the bow. If you're looking at a Vichy catalogue and have ever wondered what "coups de fermoire" means, that's traces left by these bow holders. (edit-also the trend among French case makers to put spinners at the tip end, as can be seen in some of the cases here)

The classic "spinner" seems like the best solution after all this time!

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9 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

In Kanada muss man französisch sprechen. Keine Opportunität Deutsch zu üben.

:-)

Right. <_<

I think I spoke more of my practically non-existant French on one Day in Belgium than I did in my entire life in Canada...

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8 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

It's great to see this collection on line at last! There are some fascinating cases, and I wish I didn't already have a wall of cases filling up my music room...

I got interested in the variety of bow holders. Those ornate French frog and button holders are astonishing. The simple spring clips to hold the bow stick on lot 1016 are shocking!

I was wondering when the spring button holders (lot 1014) started to appear on Hill and other English cases? I've got several with them, and I won't stick any of my valuable bows in those, especially once the protective covering has worn off.

Speaking of bad bow holder ideas, I've got an old French case with spring loaded metal clasps to hold the tip end of the bow. If you're looking at a Vichy catalogue and have ever wondered what "coups de fermoire" means, that's traces left by these bow holders. (edit-also the trend among French case makers to put spinners at the tip end, as can be seen in some of the cases here)

The classic "spinner" seems like the best solution after all this time!

Except they break and then one has to resort to rubber bands, because the manufacturers never make them easily replaceable.

VELCRO to the rescue! But that has much less charm.

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That's good to know! :)

French is an official Canadian language.  But for all intents and purposes, if you are not living in Quebec (where they often out-and-out refuse to use English, even if they are fully able to use English), no one speaks French.

...and by saying that I'm sure I just offended a kazillion French speakers...but speaking it voluntarily isn't the same as having to be able to speak it.

FWIW, I took French classes from Grade 3 - Grade 8.  Useless.  Well, unless someone sat me down somewhere, maybe in a nice cafe or restaurant...and made me conjugate verbs...

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3 minutes ago, Rue said:

That's good to know! :)

French is an official Canadian language.  But for all intents and purposes, if you are not living in Quebec (where they often out-and-out refuse to use English, even if they are fully able to use English), no one speaks French.

...and by saying that I'm sure I just offended a kazillion French speakers...but speaking it voluntarily isn't the same as having to be able to speak it.

FWIW, I took French classes from Grade 3 - Grade 8.  Useless.  Well, unless someone sat me down somewhere, maybe in a nice cafe or restaurant...and made me conjugate verbs...

I have found that most foreign language classes are useless, because Frau Webb did not teach them. I love her more than I loved any teacher I ever had. I graduated high school 1981, and still remember almost all my German. I wish I had a chance to practice it more.

Your comment about Quebec made me laugh, yes, that’s how the French are…

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On 10/30/2020 at 9:04 AM, GlennYorkPA said:

Hi Deans. Thanks for the concern and I’m pleased to report I’m still in the land of the living.

It’s unusual for entire collections to be offered for sale while the collector is still alive but that’s what’s happened.

 

In a sense, Rue had it right. Back in January, I planned to return to Europe and needed to ‘declutter’ to make the move easier. Then Covid struck and travel restrictions put the move on ice.

 

Adam Tober at Skinner came to view the collection and was excited to offer it for sale so here we are. Because I’m still alive, I’m in a position to comment on every piece and provide some background on why it is interesting or important. Much of this commentary should be available in the catalog that will accompany the auction.

 

Many of the pieces appear in ‘The Art & History of Violin Cases’ and many more will appear in the second edition. Some of the Italians appear in the ‘Registry of Baroque Violin Cases’ published in VSA Papers, 2018.

 

If any Maestronetters feel inclined to acquire a piece of violin case history, I would be happy to provide background notes and an appraisal.

Soil_handle.jpg

did you keep anything at all for yourself? If so, please share reasons etc. was this difficult for you emotionally?
 

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10 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

It's great to see this collection on line at last! There are some fascinating cases, and I wish I didn't already have a wall of cases filling up my music room...

I got interested in the variety of bow holders. Those ornate French frog and button holders are astonishing. The simple spring clips to hold the bow stick on lot 1016 are shocking!

I was wondering when the spring button holders (lot 1014) started to appear on Hill and other English cases? I've got several with them, and I won't stick any of my valuable bows in those, especially once the protective covering has worn off.

Speaking of bad bow holder ideas, I've got an old French case with spring loaded metal clasps to hold the tip end of the bow. If you're looking at a Vichy catalogue and have ever wondered what "coups de fermoire" means, that's traces left by these bow holders. (edit-also the trend among French case makers to put spinners at the tip end, as can be seen in some of the cases here)

The classic "spinner" seems like the best solution after all this time!

Hi Michael,

I'm sure you could squeeze one or two more examples into your collection, particularly as they come with impeccable provenance! :)

Interesting you home in on the bow support as I think the ideal solution has not yet been discovered. 

Skinner and I have argued over the nationality of Lot 1009 (Spanish or Italian) but the bow arrangement is wonderful. Not clear from the pictures but there are two hinged compartments in the lid which simply unlatch to reveal the bows. 

The most elaborate arrangement is 1025 made for the Soil Stradivari. It has gilded sliders which cleverly hook onto the frog leaving an unobstructed view of the bows once installed. 

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51 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Philip, I have written about this type of American case and Skinner have one included one in the auction (lot 1070).

Sometimes a lot is for 2/3 cases grouped together. I believe they were made for violins by a gun case maker trying to widen his market. :)

Glenn

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On 11/2/2020 at 8:16 AM, Rue said:

When I go to Germany...everyone speaks English...so I barely get to practice keeping up my German. It's very sad. :(

My German is fine. I'm fluent (albeit lacking a bit in vocabulary) ...but I am rusty...so I need to focus and speak it for a while for it to "come back" and up to speed. 

By then, it's time to return to Canada...:angry:

You should visit Markneukirchen then!  I was there a couple of years ago and its quite an interesting place - but no one in the entire town, literally, understands a word of English!   Without German you will starve and never get out!

Ed.

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On 11/3/2020 at 12:04 PM, BassClef said:

did you keep anything at all for yourself? If so, please share reasons etc. was this difficult for you emotionally?
 

It was very hard letting them go. A collection is more than the sum of the parts and I can't see a similar collection being assembled again in my lifetime. The jewels are in the auction but I kept a couple back because I felt that nobody would be able to appreciate them as much as me. 

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1 hour ago, GlennYorkPA said:

It was very hard letting them go. A collection is more than the sum of the parts and I can't see a similar collection being assembled again in my lifetime. The jewels are in the auction but I kept a couple back because I felt that nobody would be able to appreciate them as much as me. 

:(

*huggy*

 

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1 hour ago, Three13 said:

If you don't mind the question, what did you decide to hold back?

It's a fair question I'm happy to answer.

The first would appear to be a Hill apostle case veneered with precious satinwood from east India or Ceylon but instead of the coveted Hill name tags it has hand engraved  tags for KB Dvorak (Karel Bor. Dvorak, Prague, Bohemia). Jan Spidlen was kind enough to help me trace the case back to France rather than London so it was of enormous help in tracing the evolution of fine cases from the Hill workshop. That's of enormous historical interest to me but I felt would not excite the attention of the average collector for whom the Hill brand is now most revered.

The other case was specially made for me by GL Cases in Taiwan. I consider their leather cases to be some of the finest ever made but most people find them 'too heavy'. Their leatherwork comes from a long tradition of working in leather stitched goods but I was unhappy with the metal hardware, lock and latches. These were solid brass but with a shiney finish and I know from experience they don't age gracefully. They soon look tacky so the Company, bless them, had some fittings specially made for me with an untreated satin finish - gorgeous and eternal. They put a dedication plaque inside the lid; I couldn't part with such a personal gift. 

 

Glenn

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