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lFred

Herdin Violin Assembly Clamp with old fiddle?

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Hi I've been using old wood and cork  violin assembly clamp  for ages,

I was wondering if some of you have experience with the Herdin  , my concern is marks on the varnish.
 

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I find them to be ok in this respect. The way they are designed means that they clear the edge, and apply pressure over the fluting or purfling. On some models of violin, you will find that the curved clamps may not match the radius at the corners perfectly.

Any type of clamp has the potential to damage the varnish, or leave imprints. How you use them is of as much importance as the clamp itself.

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They work well.  I've been using them for a long time and they solve more problems than they create when working on finished instruments.
My only complaint is that after 20 or so years, a few of them have broken when using them with higher pressure than is usually needed.

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9 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

They work well.  I've been using them for a long time and they solve more problems than they create when working on finished instruments.
My only complaint is that after 20 or so years, a few of them have broken when using them with higher pressure than is usually needed.

Yes. I have had the same problem and have now replaced most of mine after about 25 years of use. Interestingly the cello clamps seem not to have the problem even though I have definitely used them as much.

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Herdim clamps are claimed to be made from polyurethane, while the Chinese knockoffs that state what they’re made from, say they’re made from ABS. Here’s an article from the automotive industry discussing the relative merits of each product, and one factor that stands out is ABS’s natural resistance to UV light, which polyurethane lacks. If I had Herdim clamps, knowing this now, I’d store them in a dark box or drawer.

And I noticed that some of the Chinese knockoffs seem to have figured out that there needs to be that step difference at the jaw surfaces. Well....., at least their photos seem to suggest that. I guess you don’t really know until you open the box.

https://www.theengineblock.com/polyurethane-and-abs-whats-the-difference-and-whats-better/

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On 10/16/2020 at 11:14 AM, Mark Norfleet said:


My only complaint is that after 20 or so years, a few of them have broken when using them with higher pressure than is usually needed.

Yup.  Same here... and same problem reported by many colleagues who have used them for 20-25 years.  I figure they've more than paid for themselves at that point though.

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33 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

Yup.  Same here... and same problem reported by many colleagues who have used them for 20-25 years.  I figure they've more than paid for themselves at that point though.

Agreed, but should I get another set expecting to get 20-25 years use from them...

As a side note, mine have seen VERY little sunlight given the location of my shop space.

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10 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

As a side note, mine have seen VERY little sunlight given the location of my shop space.

I didn’t say it was the only cause, but they will start to break down if left in the sun for a while.

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I find, after years of using modified chinese copies, that what I like the most about the herdim's is the material that they are made of.  The softer herdims are a dream to use.  

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On 10/17/2020 at 6:04 PM, Mark Norfleet said:

Agreed, but should I get another set expecting to get 20-25 years use from them...

As a side note, mine have seen VERY little sunlight given the location of my shop space.

Mine too. They are kept in a drawer unless in use...

I say go for it Mark!  If our careers outlive 'em, great!

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21 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

Mine too. They are kept in a drawer unless in use...

I say go for it Mark!  If our careers outlive 'em, great!

The Scottish blood in my veins is glad that I didn’t chuck out the old spindle cramps when I bought the Herdim ones back then

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47 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

The Scottish blood in my veins is glad that I didn’t chuck out the old spindle cramps when I bought the Herdim ones back then

Still have mine too... Can't get myself to toss useable tools.

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3 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

The Scottish blood in my veins is glad that I didn’t chuck out the old spindle cramps when I bought the Herdim ones back then

It never even crossed my mind to toss my spindly clamps.  I still use them occasionally during odd repair clamping set-ups, and they still make sense for making.  I wouldn't use the Herdims for that.

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4 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

It never even crossed my mind to toss my spindly clamps.  I still use them occasionally during odd repair clamping set-ups, and they still make sense for making.  I wouldn't use the Herdims for that.

Why?

 

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4 hours ago, arglebargle said:

Why?

 

Only for a few simple reasons..., the spindle clamps are a little faster to use and I wouldn't want the Herdim clamps to possibly be compressing soft finished areas of tops.

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4 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

Only for a few simple reasons..., the spindle clamps are a little faster to use and I wouldn't want the Herdim clamps to possibly be compressing soft finished areas of tops.

I can see that the fluting could perhaps become marked in this way, but the spool clamps can also mark the crest of the edge if tightened too much.

Maybe have less spinach before you assemble a violin next time? ;)

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4 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

I can see that the fluting could perhaps become marked in this way, but the spool clamps can also mark the crest of the edge if tightened too much.

Maybe have less spinach before you assemble a violin next time? ;)

That's a good point.

My edges don't have crests when I glue plates on, so the spool clamps spread the small amount of force they apply over a relatively large area, much of which gets removed.  I make things fit well and save my (somewhat diminishing) physical prowess for other activities.  

I am what I am.  Thanks for the reminder to add spinach to my shopping list.

 

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