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dsbake

Strasbourg Turpentine (where to find)

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Good day all Maestronetters. A long time reader of the forums here.

I just went to order a bottle of Strasbourg Turpentine from Kremer, to brew some Varnish with, as I did many years ago. I was saddened to see it is no longer available.

A google search did not yield much either.

Does anybody know of where to buy Strasbourg Turpentine these days, or if there are any viable alternatives (bearing in mind I will be cooking it down to make Varnish with).

David

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7 hours ago, joerobson said:

My inquires say that the families who were collecting the Strasbourg Turpentine are no longer

interested in doing it.

Joe

Oh dear, that is a shame. But it explains why it can no longer be found anywhere. Thank you.

Edited by dsbake
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20 minutes ago, francesco piasentini said:

hard to find in Europe.

Only way to have something similar is to harvest silver fir resin (oxidized)

anyone know whether Larch turpentine or Canada Balsam might be viable alternatives?

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On 10/12/2020 at 4:40 PM, dsbake said:

Good day all Maestronetters. A long time reader of the forums here.

I just went to order a bottle of Strasbourg Turpentine from Kremer, to brew some Varnish with, as I did many years ago. I was saddened to see it is no longer available.

A google search did not yield much either.

Does anybody know of where to buy Strasbourg Turpentine these days, or if there are any viable alternatives (bearing in mind I will be cooking it down to make Varnish with).

David

Wouldn’t silver fir rosin work? Try it.

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The de Mayerne manuscript, if I remember right, has the historical recipe..

At least, I accepted that it is the historical recipe. I'm not really anyone who knows anything. But when I was looking into this more deeply it used to really bother me how many recipes and definitions there are around these historical mediums.

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17 hours ago, xraymymind said:

anyone know whether Larch turpentine or Canada Balsam might be viable alternatives?

Larch is Venetian turpentine.

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11 minutes ago, not telling said:

The de Mayerne manuscript, if I remember right, has the historical recipe..

At least, I accepted that it is the historical recipe. I'm not really anyone who knows anything. But when I was looking into this more deeply it used to really bother me how many recipes and definitions there are around these historical mediums.

It's like the thousands of bread recipes floating around. Everyone has a slightly different spin on what it should be.

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6 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

Larch is Venetian turpentine.

I had thought that Venetian turpentine is a mixture of Larch turpentine and Colophony. Therefore, Larch is maybe the purer product.

It'd be interesting to hear if Larch turpentine would make a good varnish like Strasbourg did.

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I might be wrong, but that's what I remember.The Venetian turpentine I'm familiar with is a thick, honey-like viscous liquid.

Colophony is the hard residue left behind after distilling the volatile turpentine out of pine tar.

 

Strasbourg if I recall correctly is made from balsam fir sap.

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I've always thought...

Strasbourg = raw abies alba resin

Venetian = raw larix decidua resin

canada = raw abies balsamea resin

Of course some companies do mix/add other resins just to increase their margin or lower price.

I think all the fir (abies) resins will work very similarly. You can try to tap a fir yourself (if it grows near you). True larch resin behaves slightly differently (won't crystalize/dry) as fast as fir resins nad can be very red colored. But once cooked into varnish the differences won't be as noticeable, I believe.

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1 hour ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Silver fir, larch, and canada balsams can all be made into fine varnishes. 

I had been under the impression that Larch may make a slower drying, and softer Varnish than Canada balsam or Silver fir. But I could be completely wrong here...?

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On 10/12/2020 at 10:40 PM, dsbake said:

Good day all Maestronetters. A long time reader of the forums here.

I just went to order a bottle of Strasbourg Turpentine from Kremer, to brew some Varnish with, as I did many years ago. I was saddened to see it is no longer available.

A google search did not yield much either.

Does anybody know of where to buy Strasbourg Turpentine these days, or if there are any viable alternatives (bearing in mind I will be cooking it down to make Varnish with).

David

Hi David, 

do you have any specific reason looking for strasburg turpentine? I tried what i considered to be the most authentic resin: I collected about 8 kg of northern Italy alpine spruce pitch and clarified it. Makes quite a nice varnish, but it doesn't cook as nice and red as the cheapest "bastard" colophony i bought a few years ago. 

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