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Wood Butcher

Neck removal saw. The aftermath...

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After being admonished in the previous thread, I wanted to ask those who do saw out necks, what is your method for then refitting them?

Anything in the course of a reset will require at least some adjustment or cutting. Adjustment to the bottom of the neck root, where it meets the button, or shim at the back of the mortice could be expected, along with some subsequent retouching of the varnish.

The sawn out neck root will now be fractionally smaller than the button, after cleaning up the sawn surfaces, so do you prefer to fit shim pieces directly to the neck root, to fit shim pieces to the sides of the mortice, or to block fill the mortice, and totally re-cut it?
Do you think that now having extra joints here could compromise the integrity of the reset neck? (lots of necks will lose the varnish from the root in the future, so the joints could be exposed to sweat etc.)
Does poking a stick across the mortice really glue rib extensions on well?
If fitting shim pieces directly to the neck, how do you match the flames? (I can see this could be very tricky on a heavily flamed neck)

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9 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

The sawn out neck root will now be fractionally smaller than the button, after cleaning up the sawn surfaces,

I think you may have that part backwards.

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David was observing that, since the neck foot gets wider as it goes from the button toward the finger board, if you saw through the neck parallel to the button, the newly sawn surface of the neck will be wider than the button -- not smaller.

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23 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

David was observing that, since the neck foot gets wider as it goes from the button toward the finger board, if you saw through the neck parallel to the button, the newly sawn surface of the neck will be wider than the button -- not smaller.

I was talking about the sides of the neck root, not the parallel cut above the button.

Sorry if my terminology was not clear, I guess we all have different names for some parts.

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40 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

I was talking about the sides of the neck root, not the parallel cut above the button.

Sorry if my terminology was not clear, I guess we all have different names for some parts.

So what is your end goal? Raising/lowering projection? Raising/lowering over stand? 

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On 9/28/2020 at 12:13 PM, Wood Butcher said:

...do you prefer to fit shim pieces directly to the neck root, to fit shim pieces to the sides of the mortice, or to block fill the mortice, and totally re-cut it?...

They way I was taught, sawing along the sides of the neck should remove rib wood and block wood, but no neck wood.  So any replacement wood on the sides would be to replace missing rib and block wood.  The mortise could be completely filled, or it could have small strips glued to the sides and back and open space between them, which I prefer.

Sawing next to the button should remove neck wood, not button wood.  So any replacement wood here would be glued to the neck.

 

On 9/28/2020 at 12:13 PM, Wood Butcher said:

...Do you think that now having extra joints here could compromise the integrity of the reset neck?...

Not if the joints are good.

 

On 9/28/2020 at 12:13 PM, Wood Butcher said:

...Does poking a stick across the mortice really glue rib extensions on well?...

I don't think so. Rather than poking a stick across the mortise, I fit a wedge that exerts clamping force evenly along the entire length of the replacement block and rib pieces.

 

On 9/28/2020 at 12:13 PM, Wood Butcher said:

...If fitting shim pieces directly to the neck, how do you match the flames?...

Any pieces glued to the neck are so thin that I think it's futile to try to match the flame.  Instead, I try to match the color, grain and medulary ray orientation.

 

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7 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

So what is your end goal? Raising/lowering projection? Raising/lowering over stand? 

The end goal was to understand how people went about refitting a neck, which no longer fits the mortise after it is sawn out. Eg the method for filling the gaps you have created by sawing the neck out.

Fortunately, someone kindly sent a detailed PM, which explained it all to me.

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6 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

They way I was taught, sawing along the sides of the neck should remove rib wood and block wood, but no neck wood.  So any replacement wood on the sides would be to replace missing rib and block wood.  The mortise could be completely filled, or it could have small strips glued to the sides and back and open space between them, which I prefer.

Sawing next to the button should remove neck wood, not button wood.  So any replacement wood here would be glued to the neck.

 

Not if the joints are good.

 

I don't think so. Rather than poking a stick across the mortise, I fit a wedge that exerts clamping force evenly along the entire length of the replacement block and rib pieces.

 

Any pieces glued to the neck are so thin that I think it's futile to try to match the flame.  Instead, I try to match the color, grain and medulary ray orientation.

 

Thanks for your answers Brad, this is the kind of thing I was hoping for.

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