Interesting bow at T2 Fancy Certificate


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https://t2-auctions.com/auctions/lot/?csid=2199273472&cpid=3604037632

The certificate for this bow is from a group that I would consider very important, all three of them excellent makers and well known experts.  Why is the bow being sold as a no name bow?  It is quite heavy but I don't think that should matter. Seems rather odd anyway.

DLB

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56 minutes ago, Dwight Brown said:

The certificate for this bow is from a group that I would consider very important, all three of them excellent makers and well known experts.

That's the usual signature of the Raffin certificates, not from a group, just naming all collaborators in the shop.

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47 minutes ago, martin swan said:

T2 sell everything as "a violin bow" etc irrespective of who made it so I'm not sure what your question is ...?

It's an unbranded Louis Morizot - rather heavy and with a worrisome lift behind the head by the look of it. I assume that's why it's in T2 ...

I guess my question is why it isn't in a regular Tarisio auction. The lift is probably part of it.

DLB

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2 minutes ago, martin swan said:

There is a crack about an inch behind the head, following the grain of the wood ie. travelling forwards diagonally from the top of the stick towards the middle of the head.

If you look along the top line of the bow against the background you will see it ...

https://swansonbows.wordpress.com/2014/10/10/fixing-a-bow-lift/

In the Tarisio photo that area is curiously blurry. Thanks for confirming my suspicions.

Why does this happen? I suspect that sometimes the crack may have been there in the original bow blank.

 

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5 minutes ago, sospiri said:

In the Tarisio photo that area is curiously blurry. Thanks for confirming my suspicions.

Why does this happen? I suspect that sometimes the crack may have been there in the original bow blank.

 

It can happen due to several reasons, it was already in the wood and started to "lift" because of the pulling pressure on that area when the bow is tightened. It can occur when you drop the bow but it doesn't break or you don't see any damages. I've also seen bows with a "lift" which were not, auction houses are very paranoid about it and when there is even a scratch behind the head they will consider it a lift (good for bargain hunters if you know what to look for)

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1 minute ago, chrissweden said:

It can happen due to several reasons, it was already in the wood and started to "lift" because of the pulling pressure on that area when the bow is tightened. It can occur when you drop the bow but it doesn't break or you don't see any damages. I've also seen bows with a "lift" which were not, auction houses are very paranoid about it and when there is even a scratch behind the head they will consider it a lift (good for bargain hunters if you know what to look for)

Thanks  Chris. I understand the paranoia, it is a strange wood and I suppose that is part of the attraction.

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1 hour ago, avandesande said:

I wonder if it is possible to stabilize the wood in behind the head? There are a lot of new developments in this area recently.

One of the main problems with a lift is that you would have to make it worse to get any kind of glue into it. And however well you repair it, the value of the bow is heavily compromised.

Eric Swanson's repair is secure and stable, but the value is reduced pretty much to that of the mounts ...

My experience of lifts has not been good. It's very common for this to be disguised by unscrupulous sellers, and if the bow has no hair you don't know it's there. First time you rehair the bow and tension it up, there's a little "click" and the lift opens ... one of many good reasons never to buy a bow without hair!

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I posted a time ago about a worn Ouchard with what I guess is a lift, though it was a bit worse than the one in this picture. My friend sent it to Salchow, who did the thread-wrapping repair. I was disappointed it needed something so drastic,  but it’s well done and should never be a problem again. The bow remains one of the best I’ve ever played, and if this Morizot is a good bow, it should sure make a player happy.

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Always good to get condition report!

Lot 301 - A VIOLIN BOW, Unstamped., Round stick. Silver mounted.

Head: minor marks.
Stick: glued crack with filler behind head. 
Handle: light wear to thumb, pin grooves, minor chips to mortise.
Frog: minor crack on rail, surface wear, minor chips at ferrule and pearl slide, minor chip at throat.
Button: surface marks, in good condition.

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On 9/27/2020 at 7:39 PM, martin swan said:

One of the main problems with a lift is that you would have to make it worse to get any kind of glue into it. And however well you repair it, the value of the bow is heavily compromised.

Eric Swanson's repair is secure and stable, but the value is reduced pretty much to that of the mounts ...

My experience of lifts has not been good. It's very common for this to be disguised by unscrupulous sellers, and if the bow has no hair you don't know it's there. First time you rehair the bow and tension it up, there's a little "click" and the lift opens ... one of many good reasons never to buy a bow without hair!

Very informative!  

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