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phillip77

What's the inflation rate for violins?

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Istvan Konya! But they have been exhibiting with the "traveling Cremona show" which I managed to attend and sample 3 times. Opinion unchanged. Both father and son attended the Cremona school Father taught there for a while.

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9 minutes ago, Mark Norfleet said:

That's true.  If I remember correctly he's from Hungary.   His father was a maker too and spelled his name with a "K".

 

There were two brothers, Lajos Konja and Istvan Konja. Istvan moved to Italy and changed his name to Stefano Conia. His son, born in Italy, is also named Stefano Conia.

However, this is no different to what hundreds of thousands of American immigrants did (your dear president's family included). Probably David Burgess changed his name from Davide Borghese :lol:

 

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10 minutes ago, martin swan said:

There were two brothers, Lajos Konja and Istvan Konja. Istvan moved to Italy and changed his name to Stefano Conia. His son, born in Italy, is also named Stefano Conia.

However, this is no different to what hundreds of thousands of American immigrants did (your dear president's family included). Probably David Burgess changed his name from Davide Borghese :lol:

 

Hey, ya gotta to what you gotta do. In 1698, I changed my name from Borghese to Burgess, because British-sounding names had a lot of currency in Colonial America at the time. ;)

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1 hour ago, martin swan said:

There were two brothers, Lajos Konja and Istvan Konja. Istvan moved to Italy and changed his name to Stefano Conia. His son, born in Italy, is also named Stefano Conia.

If I remember correctly, Istvan Konia moved to Cremona from Hungary, and changed only the spelling of his last name, the first name remaining as Istvan.

His son was also born in Hungary. prior to Istvan's move. But their might now be a third generation, born in Cremona.

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I don’t think it’s really worthwhile to attempt to extrapolate inflation values based simply on prices paid at auction. Just looking at the numbers doesn’t account for condition, provenance, or desirability, all of which have major influence on prices paid. 

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All I know is my parents bought my first full size violin in 1991 for $1200. I traded it back to the dealer where they bought it in 2017 for $1100 after refurbishing fees. 

Since I didn't pay for it I guess I made money off the deal.

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7 hours ago, David Burgess said:

To the best of my knowledge, Stefano Conia is neither native Cremonese, or native Italian. Yes, they have a shop in Cremona.

Many "Cremonese" makers aren't native Cremonese resp. native Italien. Conia has had a busy shop there for about the last half century though so I don't see what difference it makes. I'm not native Austrian either. Are you "native" of Ann Arbor?

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

1. Many "Cremonese" makers aren't native Cremonese resp. native Italien. Conia has had a busy shop there for about the last half century though so I don't see what difference it makes.

2.I'm not native Austrian either. Are you "native" of Ann Arbor?

1. I don't think there are any records of Antonio Stradivari being born or baptized in Cremona either. I suspect that he was American, probably born in New Jersey. :D

2. Nope. I was born in New Joysey to parents who were born in Washington State. Americans seem to move around a lot.

 

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From an article in 2008:

"During the market upheavals of recent weeks, spot gold prices bobbed at around eight hundred dollars per ounce. The best Stradivarius violin, on the other hand, could have gone for something like seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars per ounce. That’s twelve million dollars for an avoirdupois pound of wood, if you want to be crude about it, and why shouldn’t you, these days? In this and in other ways, the great violins are, ounce for ounce, among the most valuable commodities in the world. There is even a Web site called stradivariinvest.com. Almost alone among investments, important violins have proved immune to economic downturns. Auction prices for Stradivariuses have increased from about two hundred thousand dollars in 1980 to about three million dollars today."

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2008/11/24/financial-instruments

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20 hours ago, deans said:

Are you talking about increase in value over time  or dealer markup? Both depend on numerous variables.

You could probably measure instrument inflation rate by surveying orchestra members on what they pay/paid for their instruments over time (adjusted by some rough measure of instrument quality). Sure, individual makers go in and out of vogue, but what professional musicians are paying probably goes up by a measurable percentage a year. 

 

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