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One-piece lower rib on 18th century Mirecourt violin


Goffriller
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10 hours ago, Goffriller said:

Hi everyone, 

I play on an 18th century Mirecourt violin ca.1780 that has a one-piece lower rib. I know that this construction method was quite common in Mittenwald around the same time, but do know how prevalent this was in Mirecourt (and France in general) in the 1700s.

Looking forward to your thoughts - 

118890097_775972546524341_8283508300468897889_n.jpg

Maybe a picture of the front would be interesting to see?

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3 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Plenty of Viennese instruments with Mittenwald notch, not to mention Linz, Presburg and many more, got to keep Philip confused

Correct me if I am wrong, but wasn't the "Mittenwald notch" cut on the rib, whereas Markneukirchen makers cut the notch on the plate, if they used one at all.

08bottom_rib.jpg

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1 hour ago, GeorgeH said:

Correct me if I am wrong, but wasn't the "Mittenwald notch" cut on the rib, whereas Markneukirchen makers cut the notch on the plate, if they used one at all.

08bottom_rib.jpg

Yes, thank-you. The “Mittenwald notch” has always been a misnome, since it is common to all of the 18th C. makers south of the Danube. It isn’t some weird sort of decoration, as Philip seems to think, but a helpful marking of the centre line for the maker. The makers North of the Danube (to use a slightly arbitrary dividing line) who used a “Built on back” building method, also needed to mark a centre line, but with the BOB method, the centre line was cut into the back not into the ribs. This mark is often indistinct, or full of dirt, but can as often as not be found. Thus the significance for identifying old instruments; to find a notch or alternatively a centre line cut into the back, one can exclude the violin having been made north or south of the Danube, whichever applies, to use my fairly rough generalisation.

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5 minutes ago, Jwillis said:

Ok I’m trying to keep this straight ha. So let me ask this question....typically if a person has a violin with a one piece bottom rib, what is the building method used?  Bob? Outside mold? Both? 

A one-piece rib generally excludes BoB as the original method of building the ribs.

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1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

Yes, thank-you. The “Mittenwald notch” has always been a misnome, since it is common to all of the 18th C. makers south of the Danube. It isn’t some weird sort of decoration, as Philip seems to think, but a helpful marking of the centre line for the maker. The makers North of the Danube (to use a slightly arbitrary dividing line) who used a “Built on back” building method, also needed to mark a centre line, but with the BOB method, the centre line was cut into the back not into the ribs. This mark is often indistinct, or full of dirt, but can as often as not be found. Thus the significance for identifying old instruments; to find a notch or alternatively a centre line cut into the back, one can exclude the violin having been made north or south of the Danube, whichever applies, to use my fairly rough generalisation.

Where, pray tell, did I ever refer to this notch as “decoration’”? I am actually rather fond of you, Jacob , and I enjoy your thoughts and do my best to glean everything of value from them. 
I don’t know what childhood trauma led to your apparent delight in sarcasm and condescension, but attempts to avoid them wouldn’t go amiss.

FWIW, the notch in the picture you shared looks very much like the notch in the OP violin, so I asked.

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25 minutes ago, Goffriller said:

Here is a more detailed picture of the possible notch: 

119102044_951745508623629_8351014913963392736_n.jpg

I'm not quite sure what you are trying to say, but that is quite clearly NOT a so called "Mittenwald notch" bur a centre line marking cut into the back, so for my normal area of operation, "North of the Danube" although it looks like it could just as well be budget English 

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I would not place high importance on one singular feature or another, when it comes to identification. Over my lifetime of fiddle-making, I have experimented with many sorts of things. Someone may be inclined to call various of my fiddles as being German, French, or Italian. It remains a high source of amusement. to me.

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