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Looking for repair recommendations /ID


Alto
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Hi Maestronet,

I am curious if anyone can recommend shops in the US that offer repair services via mailing an instrument, and if anyone has had a successful experience, and where. I have two soundpost cracks on the top, one of which was cleated probably some time ago, and the one nearest the f that needs repair. I've had the crack glued previously, but not shockingly  it didn't hold. 

Also would like to see if anyone has any ideas on the maker of this violin. It was sold as a French violin and has a fake guersan label.

Thanks

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I did a search on Red Bank, and came up with Red Bank, NJ. If that's where you are, why do you want a mail repair? There are plenty of good luthiers in NJ. There are also other potential issues (pegbox) with the instrument. Your pictures don't really show what's needed for identification (follow the sticky on photographing for identification), but from what I can see, it looks more like the usual dutzendarbeit. Any proper soundpost crack repair is going to be expensive (plan on well over $500).

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1 hour ago, FiddleDoug said:

I did a search on Red Bank, and came up with Red Bank, NJ. If that's where you are, why do you want a mail repair? There are plenty of good luthiers in NJ. There are also other potential issues (pegbox) with the instrument. Your pictures don't really show what's needed for identification (follow the sticky on photographing for identification), but from what I can see, it looks more like the usual dutzendarbeit. Any proper soundpost crack repair is going to be expensive (plan on well over $500).

Yes. My area is expensive and for what will already be an expensive repair I am looking for a luthier that might not have such high overhead expenses for one. I am open to exploring options around the country, or luthiers that are perhaps newer to the craft that might be a little less expensive. The two reputable shops/luthiers I know of in my state are high end-I am looking for options.

I'm not concerned about the scroll. It is in no danger of falling off:D

What luthiers in NJ can you recommend?

 

 

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11 minutes ago, stringcheese said:

If you are indeed in Red Bank New Jersey, give Christopher Germain a call in Philadelphia. He is one of my teachers and is currently working on a violin of mine (I ran out of time) that has been reliably attributed to Louis Guersan. We worked on the violin together at one time but it's been in the case untouched for too long.

Thank you, I will check this out.

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3 minutes ago, Alto said:

Yes. My area is expensive and for what will already be an expensive repair I am looking for a luthier that might not have such high overhead expenses for one. I am open to exploring options around the country, or luthiers that are perhaps newer to the craft that might be a little less expensive. The two reputable shops/luthiers I know of in my state are high end-I am looking for options.

I'm not concerned about the scroll. It is in no danger of falling off:D

I understand that you don't want to pay more than necessary, but you have to decide if you want it done well, or just done cheaply.
For something like a sound post crack, I'd want to entrust it to someone who knew what they were doing, and had done it many times over, but that's just me.

The scroll doesn't look too healthy, lets hope it does not fall off, bouncing around in a box.

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On 9/10/2020 at 11:09 AM, Wood Butcher said:

I understand that you don't want to pay more than necessary, but you have to decide if you want it done well, or just done cheaply.
For something like a sound post crack, I'd want to entrust it to someone who knew what they were doing, and had done it many times over, but that's just me.

The scroll doesn't look too healthy, lets hope it does not fall off, bouncing around in a box.

Well both of course! :D Kidding aside, I definitely agree that it should be done well and that it is a craft that takes serious skill. I know the scroll has some repaired damage. What would be some of the main concerns about leaving the scroll as is? From what I can see, it does seem pretty solid at the moment. Thanks

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  • 11 months later...

Hi everyone,

I thought  I would update this thread as I have managed to find a luthier afterall in my area with reasonable prices. I now have the violin in the shop and I was able to get photos of the inside- I struggled with the angles etc, but maybe they will be workable for more ideas on identification? I'm still considering whether an appraisal would be worth it.

 I am having the soundpost patch done, and it was suggested the bass bar might be replaced as well due to the dementions not lining up with where it should be( I believe that's how it was explained) is it possible to say how much this affects sound? Can anyone weigh in on whether to just replace or leave it as is?

As always, thanks for the input.

 

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15 minutes ago, Alto said:

Hi everyone,

I thought  I would update this thread as I have managed to find a luthier afterall in my area with reasonable prices. I now have the violin in the shop and I was able to get photos of the inside- I struggled with the angles etc, but maybe they will be workable for more ideas on identification? I'm still considering whether an appraisal would be worth it.

 I am having the soundpost patch done, and it was suggested the bass bar might be replaced as well due to the dementions not lining up with where it should be( I believe that's how it was explained) is it possible to say how much this affects sound? Can anyone weigh in on whether to just replace or leave it as is?

As always, thanks for the input.

 

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I can’t see anything wrong with the bass bar. To judge by the inside work (blocks) it’s probably early/mid 19th C. French

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6 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I can’t see anything wrong with the bass bar. To judge by the inside work (blocks) it’s probably early/mid 19th C. French

Thanks jacob. Would there ever be a reason to replace a bass bar other than if damaged?

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9 hours ago, Alto said:

Thanks jacob. Would there ever be a reason to replace a bass bar other than if damaged?

if it were in the way of some other repair would be a rfeason.

I often think the replacement of bars is widepread but futile. I suppose I could go and dig a big hole in my garden, but I would have to fill it right back in afterwards, so I would wonder what for. I suppose it might kill off the dandylions, but it might not either.

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Thanks for posting these pictures, they answer a question that has puzzled me for a number of years.

I started a thread a while back to ask about  a combination of inside and outside mitres on a violin I own. This violin has the same mitres as mine. The bottom C-bout mitre is inside and the top C-bout mitre is outside.

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That’s in no way a combination between something, but the way the ribs were built on the back over preinstalled within the older French school. We would need to see photos from inside your’s to decide if it’s from that school either.

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3 hours ago, Delabo said:

The bottom C-bout mitre is inside and the top C-bout mitre is outside.

With ribs "built on the back around blocks" @jacobsaunders says:

"Whereas we expect the Saxon (and other) built on back ribs to have the joint between the upper/middle ribs in the middle, and the Mittenwald ones on a mitre, this French way can be a bit hit and miss between the two, although it isn't really contingent on the building method, and thus not suitable as a clue."

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Blank face said:

That’s in no way a combination between something, but the way the ribs were built on the back over preinstalled within the older French school. We would need to see photos from inside your’s to decide if it’s from that school either.

I had already come to the conclusion that the the combination of inner and outer rib mitres was because of the construction process. I had also come to the conclusion that the most likely method was the French built around the block construction. As to why it would end up with mixed mitres was,and, still is a puzzle for me. Perhaps you can explain it  ?

In fact the internal  rib construction of my violin is not the same as the OP's, although it has been confirmed as circa 1820.  I am in no way suggesting that mine is French, nor built around blocks, its just that I am pleased to see that such a construction consists after posting a question about it. This is my original post...........

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Delabo said:

I had already come to the conclusion that the the combination of inner and outer rib mitres was because of the construction process. I had also come to the conclusion that the most likely method was the French built around the block construction. As to why it would end up with mixed mitres was,and, still is a puzzle for me. Perhaps you can explain it  ?

In fact the internal  rib construction of my violin is not the same as the OP's, although it has been confirmed as circa 1820.  I am in no way suggesting that mine is French, nor built around blocks, its just that I am pleased to see that such a construction consists after posting a question about it. This is my original post...........

 

 

The best way to understand something would seem to always be to try it out yourself at the bench. I cannot explain it, since you have provided to few details (pictures) I could however imagine it has to do with in which order which rib was made

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20 minutes ago, Delabo said:

 As to why it would end up with mixed mitres was,and, still is a puzzle for me. Perhaps you can explain it  ?

Though I do know how to shape inner mold corners these days as compared to when I started out it sounds like the upper ribs were glued first on yours, then the c- bout ribs secondly and the lower bout ribs lastly.

 

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Always worth bearing in mind that people make mistakes, and sometimes do different things.

I’ve just closed up a mid 19th century English violin, which is undergoing restoration. All of the internal work is still original, construction method is built up from the back.

Three of the corner blocks are the English standard, the upper treble one is shaped like an old french block. When you examine the rib, it’s clear they cracked it slightly while bending, so made a much larger block to support the cracked portion.

Similar can happen with rib mires, when one was cut a bit too short. To compensate, rather than a central joint, there might be a more rudimentary overlap. Giving the impression it was intentionally mitred.

I’ve seen linings, where one end is mortified into the block, but the other end wasn’t, presumably because it was cut too short.

No one felt the need to start over.

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