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Restoration process question


Goran74
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Hello, 

I opened the following violin (I decided to restore it). It seems that is built on the back (the fast way - no mold). The back was half opened so that s why I removed it first. The violin has no damages on front and back plates. 

I understand that it was a cheap, fast made instrument, but I think I can do something better for it. I want to replace all the linings that are badly cutted. Do you thing I have to add corner blocks? Also, would it be good idea to rebuild it on the back, or to begin by gluing linings ribs, glue the back and then open the front? (the neck is glued with epoxy as I examined, and it will be hard to remove it too). I want to make new block at the base too. It does not have good contact with anything. 

About the bass bar.: I will cut of the kind of bar that has. But, do I have to add a modern one or to make shorter (close to baroque size)? 

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You will find that the bass bar is carved from the belly wood, and not stuck in afterwards. It doesn’t have corner blocks because that method of building ribs doesn’t reqire corner blocks, and still doesn’t, unless the rib corners are coming apart. It has linings already, so making new ones is “for the fish” as they say here. The fiddle will be from the late 19th C , so “Baroque” has nothing to do with it. You could clean all the dirt out, which you didn’t mention, otherwise it is confusing why you took the back off.

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11 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

You will find that the bass bar is carved from the belly wood, and not stuck in afterwards. It doesn’t have corner blocks because that method of building ribs doesn’t reqire corner blocks, and still doesn’t, unless the rib corners are coming apart. It has linings already, so making new ones is “for the fish” as they say here. The fiddle will be from the late 19th C , so “Baroque” has nothing to do with it. You could clean all the dirt out, which you didn’t mention, otherwise it is confusing why you took the back off.

Mr. Saunders thanks for responding and I express my respect to your words. The back was open in the most parts and deformed. It is from late 19th and I know the bar is carved. I was thinking if it has any sense to make new. The top is badly carved from the inside. The rib corners are open too. Linings are bad made too. Some are unglued  and some very bad cuted.

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Since you are already inside, and determined to do something, if I were going to do anything, and basically I agree with Jacob, it would be to take out the neck, put in a real upper block, and give it a real neck set to modern specs, and put it a real bar. But this would be a labor of love and practice, because the violin probably isn't worth it.

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3 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

give it a real neck set to modern specs, and put it a real bar.

We discussed this question reg. carved bars several times before, and it is clear that the violin has a "real" bar already in no way inferior to a glued on one. As long as there are no repairs necessary in the bassbar region it's nonsense to plane it out and make another.

Also the linings can be clamped and reglued easily (after cleaning). The most important thing would be to get the neck right, as Jacob suggested above. If you'll follow his instructions, it doesn't even need another top block.

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The next person along to deal with a neck problem will wish the neck block had been set right when the instrument was already open. And regarding the bar, I don't agree with Dr Maestronet's "we" panel.

If, however, your wish is to do a halfassed job, Dr Maestronet can consult with Dr Google for advice, apparently.

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2 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

The next person along to deal with a neck problem will wish the neck block had been set right when the instrument was already open. And regarding the bar, I don't agree with Dr Maestronet's "we" panel.

If, however, your wish is to do a halfassed job, Dr Maestronet can consult with Dr Google for advice, apparently.

One could in the start realize what we’re talking about and if the OP instrument would have any real improvement if the box is cleaned out of linings and the (of course roughly) carved bar. And yes, “we” had several threads before discussing carved bass bars, which can be worked out very neatly, too.

Hard to tell what a future repair person might think about replacing a through neck. This isn’t a violin of any greater historical value so the question of keeping the originality isn’t  significant like at others where I found it a pity that it was altered, but nonetheless a well done re-installation of such a neck will hold a long time. The installation of a real upper block would need to remove the top, too, solve out or cut the neck from the ribs, graft it or elongate the heel and so on. Why should this be done when the existing neck can be put back into good working order?

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