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Rue

Cremona - The Dark Future (take 2 on Cremona)

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11 hours ago, jezzupe said:

well I find watching geezers used to roller skates trying to "toe stop" with roller blades most entertaining, It just adds a new level of pain to the entire thing, cause remember, that's what people are paying to see ;)

 

...I want to dress as a gladiator and yell " Are you not entertained?!!!"

 

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1 minute ago, Fossil Ledges said:

...I want to dress as a gladiator and yell " Are you not entertained?!!!"

 

So Bobby,....do you like movies about gladiators?  :lol:

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35 minutes ago, jezzupe said:

So Bobby,....do you like movies about gladiators?  :lol:

This seems an appropriate time for the inappropriate......  :lol:

 

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On 7/8/2020 at 10:34 PM, MANFIO said:

My idea about the market is that in some years just the top makers will survive, the middle makers will disappear.

Many makers that are considered top makers today were considered just middle makers when they were alive and they would not survive today's market, makers like Rocca (he was declared legally poor), Scarampella, most of the Milanese, Napolitan, and perhaps even Guarneri del Gesù would not survive in today's market. and that is a sad thing.

Perhaps 90% - or more - of all Italian makers of the past would fit the middle makers range today. Well, these middle makers will disappear, at least in expensive cities in the first world countries.
 

Eventually, this will make the top bench made instruments even more exclusive and expensive. European sports cars are comparatively much more expensive now than they were 40 years ago, the competition made them more expensive, more exclusive. Our clothes are made in factories today (and are rather cheap) but if you need a custom made suit with English fabric you will pay much more for it today than 40 years ago when we had many tailors in our neighborhood. The same for good mechanic watches, you will pay a mint today for a good Swiss mechanic watch that 40 years ago was affordable for most of the people.

But I may be just too grumpy today.

What do you consider the characteristics of the top 10 percent makers and violins? 

My observation is there are a lot of good makers who are trained and make a good quality product, but those products are all the same. I have tried a handful of modern cremonese violins and the look, sound, and finish was indistinguishable. 

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21 hours ago, Navyasw02 said:

What do you consider the characteristics of the top 10 percent makers and violins? 

My observation is there are a lot of good makers who are trained and make a good quality product, but those products are all the same. I have tried a handful of modern cremonese violins and the look, sound, and finish was indistinguishable. 

The violin market is a bit like the art market....Yes, personality is hard to find (good personality), but sometimes the market is not prepared to it. Van Gogh sold just one of his oil in his entire life. We love the personality of Scarampella's violins, but he was very very poor, the same for the Antoniazzis and Rocca.

Some say that the standardization of some Italian modern violins was dictated by Asian dealers in the 80's  who would buy everything in Cremona that fitted their ideas about what a good violin is.

 

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The idea of standardization in Cremona is somewhat complicated. I think it’s true that there are a lot of violins that have a very similar style and appearance, but it’s hard to tell how much of that comes from the demands of buyers and how much comes from the similarities that arise when makers learn the same style. Having schools does tend to make style more uniform, but it also helps to raise the overall level of the workmanship. I’ve seen some quite nice modern violins coming in from Italy, both at the master level and at the workshop level.

I believe there are makers in Italy whose instruments are recognizable. I hesitate to say they have more character because a determination of that kind strikes me as a little too subjective. 

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On 7/11/2020 at 6:06 PM, Navyasw02 said:

What do you consider the characteristics of the top 10 percent makers and violins? 

My observation is there are a lot of good makers who are trained and make a good quality product, but those products are all the same. I have tried a handful of modern cremonese violins and the look, sound, and finish was indistinguishable. 

A famous violin maker once told me about entering a competition.  Afterward when all the violins were displayed on tables for viewing he said he had trouble finding his own violin.

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On 7/8/2020 at 6:26 AM, Rue said:

I am not going to comment on the quality of this BBC article. :ph34r:

...but it should share the Cremona section of the virtual bookshelf...you know, where the periodicals and articles hang out...

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20200707-the-dark-future-for-the-worlds-greatest-violin-makers

I was interviewed by that journalist, and after an hour of chatter and explanations he wrote only a couple of sentences extrapolated from the conversation, after which two days later he calls me and tells me that his editor wanted a note with more "color" at that point  I tell him "anything I tell you about how I lived that period at home is a banality, I stayed at home like everyone else to make bread!"
Take your own conclusion....

 

Pablo F.

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Pablo!  I think you need to write your own article, from your point of view.  It needs to go on the shelf along with the others! :)

Seriously!  This is a historical moment!  Eye witness accounts are invaluable!

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I am the last person in the world to even consider offering business advice to anyone.  However, it seems to me that Covid 19 needs to be seen as a disruptive technology on steroids.  The web demolished the old media paradigms, and dramatically changed pretty much everything else, over a period of years while the virus has done it in months.  I don't believe it to be hyperbole to say things will never be the same.  There is a very interesting case study in Cremona for an enterprising MBA student to work on.  Perhaps the makers could consider commissioning a review of their industry.

Keep safe,

Tim

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On 7/16/2020 at 9:08 AM, Chango said:

I was interviewed by that journalist, and after an hour of chatter and explanations he wrote only a couple of sentences extrapolated from the conversation, after which two days later he calls me and tells me that his editor wanted a note with more "color" at that point  I tell him "anything I tell you about how I lived that period at home is a banality, I stayed at home like everyone else to make bread!"
Take your own conclusion....

 

Pablo F.

Ciao Pablo,

I understand the journalist, your flatbread is unsurpassed, he must have been impressed...:D

The "creativity" of some journalists is often a problem, sadly.

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On 7/17/2020 at 6:26 PM, Davide Sora said:

Ciao Pablo,

I understand the journalist, your flatbread is unsurpassed, he must have been impressed...:D

The "creativity" of some journalists is often a problem, sadly.

Ciao Davide!! 
We haven't seen each other for a long time, I hope everything is fine. However imagine if he had tasted my focaccia!!! :o

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11 hours ago, Chango said:

Ciao Davide!! 
We haven't seen each other for a long time, I hope everything is fine. However imagine if he had tasted my focaccia!!! :o

I dare not imagine what fantasies would have arisen in his head...:lol:

I hope everything is fine for you too, the seclusion power of this COVID is incredible, even in a small town like Cremona where it is usually almost impossible not to meet sooner or later:)

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