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Anders Buen

Which Strad has its original neck?

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Even the small few which do have original necks, have in the main, been totally reshaped when extended and adapted for modern playing.

Perhaps only the Medici tenor is a good example of how the necks were originally made.

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The Harrison in the National Music Museum, here a particular of the extended neck.

resize:format=full

The 3 filled  holes left by the nails used by Strad in the baroque neck setting system can be seem due to the reshaping of the neck heel. resize:format=fullresize:format=full

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Not Strads but these instruments have original necks..

https://emuseum.nmmusd.org/objects/6793/viola?ctx=7a9bdba4-af4a-4f5b-9c27-5ff0f0404e13&idx=6

https://emuseum.nmmusd.org/objects/6795/violino-piccolo?ctx=af5dbcdf-981f-4891-b45b-c04e3407c8e0&idx=80

Both at the National Music Museum but closed till 2021.  You’re probably going to have some trouble finding museums that are open for the time being.

 

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There's a crack in the [fingerboard] at the neck/fingerboard join which is generally denied to be significant i.e. as to whether it means the board was removed at some later point.  Assuming it was removed and put back, there's a list of increasingly less direct implications as to modifications which might have been performed, and if you start thinking about that you have to have a look at the bridge, which is not currently at the height its decorations imply (Michael Darnton pointed that out to me long ago).  But the neck and fingerboard appear to be original and the instrument is always described as unmodified.

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30 minutes ago, Andres Sender said:

There's a crack in the neck at the neck/fingerboard join which is generally denied to be significant i.e. as to whether it means the board was removed at some later point.  Assuming it was removed and put back, there's a list of increasingly less direct implications as to modifications which might have been performed, and if you start thinking about that you have to have a look at the bridge, which is not currently at the height its decorations imply (Michael Darnton pointed that out to me long ago).  But the neck and fingerboard appear to be original and the instrument is always described as unmodified.

But I'll bet it is not as it came from the shop, there must have been some movement and change in geometry, just because things change, perhaps some more subtle modifications?

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Oops the crack is in the fingerboard, and FWIW Pollens mentions a wedge under the fingerboard.  I should have checked the pictures!image.gif.26bf004464139a8f4d7849b10fda1424.gifimage.gif.26bf004464139a8f4d7849b10fda1424.gif

1 hour ago, deans said:

But I'll bet it is not as it came from the shop, there must have been some movement and change in geometry, just because things change, perhaps some more subtle modifications?

You have to allow for this kind of thing, yes.

 

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as above -- the Strad Tenor viola in Florence has an unaltered neck (but with wedge) according to Beare / Pollens etc. Very fine photos in the B&G strad varnish book.

I dont know the source of this image but you can clearly see the original nails through the block

1751683588_vaStradivariAMediciTenor1690-necknails.thumb.jpg.9ea514dba6bfc01a99a60f9c548f9375.jpg

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How about the 1712 Fountaine Dancemaster's violin featured in the 1987 Exhibition book?
It seems to be intact without any grafts.

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12 hours ago, DoorMouse said:

How about the 1712 Fountaine Dancemaster's violin featured in the 1987 Exhibition book?
It seems to be intact without any grafts.

3042FA70-E030-4BE2-BCCE-7A8581968A9F.thumb.jpeg.6d1fa9c7f0d3b0799dbaab3a675e0402.jpeg

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