Rue

Olaf restores a Hill!

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I luv Olaf the violin maker! :wub:

He's restoring a Hill violin and I'm going to watch along while he does so!

I think it's great that he's putting himself out there and taking the time to explain everything nice and clearly.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Rue said:

He's restoring a Hill violin and I'm going to watch along while he does so!

I think it's great that he's putting himself out there and taking the time to explain everything nice and clearly.

Very interesting - thanks for posting.

Watching this first stage, I was a bit surprised at how quickly he seemed to go to an abrasive to clean the instrument - water with pumice powder. Does anyone with experience think this is this likely to have been a slower process outside of the video edit - i.e. only after unsuccessful testing of the most mild solvents, starting with plain water etc - or is water + pumice a good starting point for this type of cleaning if you are confident you know what you are looking at?

thanks,

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It is interesting to note that the Hale shop imported Violin’s from the continent just like everybody else. I am unclear as to whether this Violin Had its original French label and the Hill label was just a “sold by” label, Or they actually marketed it as being Made in house.

I’m a bit curious as to why the original gentleman would go all the way from Australia to England to buy a violin made in France(Especially after the awful way the English populated Australia in the first place) instead of just going all the way from Australia to France and cutting out the middleman.

Meanwhile, the Hill shop kept excellent records. Do we know all the makers from whom they obtained instruments?

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PhilipKT, I believe that you are wrongly interpreting (rewriting/inventing) what Olaf said about Hill’s. 

Andrew

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Yeah I'm pretty sure he means a French maker based at the Hill workshop in London, not actually made in France. Or am I misunderstanding?

Great vids!

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3 hours ago, Shelbow said:

There is one for sale at Bridgewood. States Hills asked him to come and work in London. He died in Hanwell.

https://bridgewoodandneitzert.london/product/violin-w-e-hill-sons-made-charles-francois-langonet-1906/

Few Hill's at the RAM, nice instruments.

You can ...(Get it on Finance).

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Pfft! Who worries about rent? Only the art is important! :)

...<_<

...:mellow:

...:ph34r:

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He must be very experienced in planing ebony fingerboards... I noticed that he angles his plane which also avoids tear out.  But I would check the fingerboard scoop with a straight edge before polishing it... I don't trust my little plane to put the proper scoop

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Part 3 is up!  

I'm still confused by varnish touch-ups.  From reading on MN I've concluded that there are (arguably) too many different varnishes...how do you know how to touch one up?  Is there a one-size-fits-all multipurpose varnish fixer-upper?

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While I know nothing about violin making, my impression from watching him is that he probably knows his stuff.  He's a second generation luthier I think?

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I love this; years of violin lessons result in good posture :lol::

Since a very young age, Olaf spent a lot of time in his fathers violin shop, first in Hamburg, and later in Rotenburg (Wümme), Germany. When he was 8, he began learning the violin under Toscho Matov, a second generation Leopold Auer Student. It was a rigorous and disciplined training and it taught him a lot about the importance of a good posture.

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Yes! But it has an editing glitch near the end...lol...I hope he fixes it. The new part stopped mid-sentence...I want to hear the rest of it! ^_^

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@PhilipKT

This video explains the "industry". Sometimes it's nice just to hear someone vocalize what we've been reading...

...and, Olaf mentions/markets his "house brands" too...

Edited by Rue
Typo...

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17 minutes ago, Rue said:

@PhilipKT

This video explains the "industry". Sometimes it's nice just to hear some vocalize what we've been reading...

...and, Olaf mentions/markets his "house brands" too...

Thank you, it’s always nice to learn more 

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On 5/19/2020 at 2:58 AM, notsodeepblue said:

Very interesting - thanks for posting.

Watching this first stage, I was a bit surprised at how quickly he seemed to go to an abrasive to clean the instrument - water with pumice powder. Does anyone with experience think this is this likely to have been a slower process outside of the video edit - i.e. only after unsuccessful testing of the most mild solvents, starting with plain water etc - or is water + pumice a good starting point for this type of cleaning if you are confident you know what you are looking at?

For most really good restorers, buildup removal will start with the mildest solvent (plain water), and then ramp up in small increments from there. I don't know of any in "to die for" category who start with abrasives.

However, I am enjoying  Olaf's videos, and he does a much better job than the vast majority of "internet fiddle-fixing" videos. :)

Wish I could have run into him when I was in Australia. We could have had some good times.

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I seem to be the one to bitch and complain and find fault, but I always look for potential problems to keep disaster at bay.

Too Many things here are in the category of,,, do not do it this way, please.

Do we need a list.

When someone has done something for a long time, the familiarity causes a relaxed casual attitude that can border upon disaster.

If someone with no experience took these examples as how to do things, the outcome might not be good.

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