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J.DiLisio

Cannone Fittings

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I read somewhere recently that the Cannone has baroque style fittings that are used when the instrument is on display and then swapped out for fancy modern fittings when it has a night out on the town. 
Does anyone have photos or details of the older fittings? 
The instrument is pictured in both the 1995 and 1998 catalogs with a thin wedge under the modern fingerboard to raise the neck angle.  You can see a snippet of the baroque fingerboard without the wedge in this neck root photo..

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I was wondering if there is a tailpiece, bridge and saddle to match and if it gets strung with gut. 
I'm also curious if the purfling strip at the endpin is original or if there is evidence of a repair there. It's hard to tell if the ribs were originally one piece across the bottom or not. 

 

 

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I've also heard that Paganini made his gut strings from the entrails of his lovers in order to capture their souls. Can anyone point me towards the necessary incantations?  Asking for a friend. 

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If Bruce Carlson doesn't respond any time soon, look up his past activity. He is the luthier-conservator of the Cannone, and has posted many things in the past about the various setups.

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/profile/29446-bruce-carlson/content/

As far as what you have heard about Paganini's  strings, I heard that he made them from the entrails of competing violinists, in order to render them dead.  So this must be true. :lol:

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Pagganini had a new fingerboard put on his cannone in Vienna in 1828 by Nicolas Sawitzky. A personal thank you letter from Pagganini himself is preserved in the Kusthistorishen Museum. I posted it in this forum a few years ago, so you might like to see if you have more luck with the search function than I did.

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57 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

WTF? Almost any fiddle maker has been referred to as "a Stradivari-alike genius", whether by the popular press, or by the "nuthuggers".

People who will really want to sort this out will need to rise to a higher level.

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6 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

WTF? Almost any fiddle maker has been referred to as "a Stradivari-alike genius", whether by the popular press, or by the "nuthuggers".

People who will really want to sort this out will need to rise to a higher level.

Lets just wait until Paganini himself describes David Burgess in a personal letter as “a Stradivari-alike Genius”:)

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44 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

Lets just wait until Paganini himself describes David Burgess in a personal letter as “a Stradivari-alike Genius”:)

Should Paganani choose to do so, I would be willing to send him a free toaster, as long as my total cost, including shipping, doesn't go over fifty dollars. :P

I have never been on the "endorsement for money" train, though I will occasionally endorse people who I genuinely think are highly talented in one area or another.

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In the movie the Devils Violinist, Paganini (David Garret) is playing a violin with a modern bridge!! and is also not playing with the real Cannone.

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Hi DoorMouse,

In case you are trying to track down original Del Gesu fittings, the "Chardon" violino piccolo is the place to look.  Sadly the original bridge is gone. 

 

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Several years back there was a photo of the fittings of the restored Cannone here. I think they were made by someone in Naples. I remember them as being blonde and being sort of baroque looking. It would be Bruce C. that would know the answer to this as David said. My memory is very "Strad-like" since he is not only older than dirt, but actually under the dirt.

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1 hour ago, Michael Appleman said:

Paganini didn't write that, it was Blank Face's misreading of Paganini's handwriting. No nuthuggers here...

Right there. I misread "genio straordinario" (extraordinary genius) as "genio Stradivario", what could be excused as a sort of Freudian misconception. Nonetheless we could watch all evenings now a reality TV show celebrating a certain bloke himself as one of the most stable genius of all times in all regards, so this ain't something being out of fashion.

One of my favourite Cannone videos which allows an interesting view how the instrument is restrung and the bridge changed:

 

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1 hour ago, MeyerFittings said:

Several years back there was a photo of the fittings of the restored Cannone here. I think they were made by someone in Naples. I remember them as being blonde and being sort of baroque looking. It would be Bruce C. that would know the answer to this as David said. My memory is very "Strad-like" since he is not only older than dirt, but actually under the dirt.

But under the dirt, where? Wasn't the Maestro Stradivari un-entombed from his supposed original resting place, and moved somewhere else?

I am currently making violins from trees growing above Stradivari's body, and thus furnished with his nutrients. These trees may or may not be in Nova Scotia. ;)

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About the bridge, FWIW I think even the relative caution in that paper doesn't go far enough in being skeptical of the attribution of the bridges from the Paris Conservatory.  One of those bridges is ascribed to Andrea Guarnieri and is of the same general type.  The labeling may have been just a practical shop tracking procedure.  In any case it's unknown what level of expertise the labeler had or what audience the labels were intended to communicate to.  It would need more solid proof for me to believe that a bridge design quite different from those seen with the Stradivari Medici tenor viola and workshop artifacts would have been in use by the late 17th c. and then would have changed very little over the next 100+ years, including during the time of the wholesale reworking of instruments to suit new musical requirements.

Bridges are the great blank spot in understanding original violin setups.  Further complicated by the fact that violins likely to be contemporary and in use don't appear much in paintings toward the end of the era.  Although I did just stumble on a good portrait of Veracini from ca. 1730 in which he has a Strad style bridge.  But yes, [iconography argument].

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1 hour ago, Mark Caudle said:

I would be very sceptical about any bridge with modern style ankles to the feet before about 1750

That's very interesting. It's not that I'm doubting what you're saying, I'm just wondering on what evidence you base that assertion. Aside from iconography, do we have any reliably datable bridges besides the Stradivari examples?

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There is a collection of old 18th C fittings, including bridges, which originally came from the collection of Wilhelm Thomas Jaura, in the Technische Museum in Vienna. The big surprise is how little they differ to modern ones

 

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21 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Pagganini had a new fingerboard put on his cannone in Vienna in 1828 by Nicolas Sawitzky. A personal thank you letter from Pagganini himself is preserved in the Kusthistorishen Museum. I posted it in this forum a few years ago, so you might like to see if you have more luck with the search function than I did.

Pagganini?  

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2 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

That's very interesting. It's not that I'm doubting what you're saying, I'm just wondering on what evidence you base that assertion. Aside from iconography, do we have any reliably datable bridges besides the Stradivari examples?

I think in the RAM Beckett collection book, there are a few pages of photos of original bridges.

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14 hours ago, DoorMouse said:

Thanks!  This is a fascinating read and answers most of my questions regarding the setup. 
I had no idea the heartless bridge is possibly an original and it's cool to see the instrument in it's transitional phase.

You can't believe everything you read in print. I totally disagree the hypothesis that this bridge could have been put there by Guarneri 'del Gesù'. The other bridge, in the collection tagged 'Guarneri', and housed in the Cité de la Musique in Paris, could have come from the 'Alard' but is certainly not in a style that you could attribute to Guarneri 'del Gesù'. If you look at the bridges in the Schreinzner collection from Vienna, this style of bridge or similar were being used all over Europe from London to Vienna and most of these bridges are tagged with makers active after 1750 a Mark Caudle mentioned.

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22 hours ago, DoorMouse said:

I read somewhere recently that the Cannone has baroque style fittings that are used when the instrument is on display and then swapped out for fancy modern fittings when it has a night out on the town. 
Does anyone have photos or details of the older fittings? 
The instrument is pictured in both the 1995 and 1998 catalogs with a thin wedge under the modern fingerboard to raise the neck angle.  You can see a snippet of the baroque fingerboard without the wedge in this neck root photo..

spacer.png
 

I was wondering if there is a tailpiece, bridge and saddle to match and if it gets strung with gut. 
I'm also curious if the purfling strip at the endpin is original or if there is evidence of a repair there. It's hard to tell if the ribs were originally one piece across the bottom or not. 

 

 

image7.jpg

I've also heard that Paganini made his gut strings from the entrails of his lovers in order to capture their souls. Can anyone point me towards the necessary incantations?  Asking for a friend. 

spacer.png

Just some quiet culinary activities on a quiet Saturday night...

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There is a good doctoral dissertation for someone out there willing to do an exhaustive synopsis with some legit sleuthing!

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