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germain

Reshaping neck

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I recently obtained a violin that needs the neck to be gently reshaped because it feels a bit uncomfortable. I can totally do it myself and refinish it but wondering what to use to seal the wood after sanding. I have ultra fine sandpaper and steel wool and I can get it to that point no problem but would like a recommendation on  some kind of polish to seal the wood. Any recommendations? 

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Avoid steel wool. 2 reasons : 1-fine bits of the wool tend to end up in the pores and will rust over time. 2-steel wool often has oil in it to keep it from rusting and that may cause problems with finish adherence. 

Scrape, file,sand, however you choose to do it. Raise the grain a few times and smooth it. Seal with shellac so that you leave something to work with later should you or someone else wants it redone. At least the shellac is compatible with most things that you would use.

Micromesh is a useful alternative to steel wool.

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I have been using the traditional shellac in alcohol "french polish" with a drop of linseed oil dabbed on an rubbed in at the end when the shellac starts to "grab." I don't like too much shiny stuff on the neck, personally, but one doesn't have to build up multiple layers. I recently tried using a thing called "Dragon Polish" which i think is just re-bottled Nico polish, on a couple of necks, and I like the way it came out and feels in the hand once it's rubbed out and dry. Thumbs up for Micromesh!

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Rubbing fine pumice powder with alcohol on a rag makes a very effective sealer for necks. After drying and rubbing hard with a clean linen cloth, the neck becomes really smooth and shiny. A "shoeshine technique" works well.

If I need to dye/adjust the color, I do it beforehand. I prefer color "extracts" (Hammerl amber-brown, etc) over artist's colors in tubes, or some oil-soluble "aniline" dyes, and I mix them with a little tung oil or linseed oil. Very little color extract is necessary. This restores the appearance and reflection of the old wood

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38 minutes ago, Giovanni Corazzol said:

 

If I need to dye/adjust the color, I do it beforehand. I prefer color "extracts" (Hammerl amber-brown, etc) over artist's colors in tubes, or some oil-soluble "aniline" dyes, and I mix them with a little tung oil or linseed oil. Very little color extract is necessary. This restores the appearance and reflection of the old wood

I just use very strong instant coffee.

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15 hours ago, Blank face said:

Don’t forget to seal the end grain at heel and pegbox with thin hide glue several times before dyeing.

If the end grain is sealed before coloring then as the neck wears it will reveal a ring of lighter colored wood at the edge of the varnished area which cannot be stained because the grain is sealed. If the color is applied first the  color remains consistent as the neck wears and if any reshaping is required more color can be easily blended in. With a new neck or a neck which is being reshaped completely including stripping the heels then I apply a size  after the color but before varnishing.

Several very extensive discussions previously on MN about neck shaping and finishing.

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On 4/28/2020 at 10:34 PM, germain said:

I recently obtained a violin that needs the neck to be gently reshaped because it feels a bit uncomfortable. I can totally do it myself and refinish it but wondering what to use to seal the wood after sanding. I have ultra fine sandpaper and steel wool and I can get it to that point no problem but would like a recommendation on  some kind of polish to seal the wood. Any recommendations? 

The recipe posted here by Matthew Noykos is straightforward and works for me:

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/324250-neck-sealer/&do=findComment&comment=511743

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/324250-neck-sealer/&do=findComment&comment=511791

There are some good ideas by other participants in that thread as well....

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On 4/29/2020 at 3:45 AM, Giovanni Corazzol said:

Rubbing fine pumice powder with alcohol on a rag makes a very effective sealer for necks. After drying and rubbing hard with a clean linen cloth, the neck becomes really smooth and shiny. A "shoeshine technique" works well.

If I need to dye/adjust the color, I do it beforehand. I prefer color "extracts" (Hammerl amber-brown, etc) over artist's colors in tubes, or some oil-soluble "aniline" dyes, and I mix them with a little tung oil or linseed oil. Very little color extract is necessary. This restores the appearance and reflection of the old wood

Agreed, and I use diatomaceous  earth, it works in the same manner as the pumice.

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On 4/30/2020 at 9:26 AM, JoeDeF said:

The recipe posted here by Matthew Noykos is straightforward and works for me:

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/324250-neck-sealer/&do=findComment&comment=511743

 

Yes! and, for me the most convenient way to prepare and store chicory is to make an extract, filter it well, add some caramelized sugar and boil it down to a thick syrup. It can be stored indefinitely in a small jar. Putting a few drops of water in the lid  and re-dissolving a small quantity of dye (with a brush or a small rag) is fast and easy like having some kind of watercolor.

I rarely have instant coffee in the worskhop and nobody seems to like it here anyway! But, apart from that, coffee always turned out to be more opaque than chicory. I don't know why.... 

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20 hours ago, Giovanni Corazzol said:

 

I rarely have instant coffee in the worskhop and nobody seems to like it here anyway!

Quite right, I would never actually drink it.  I used to go to Genova every month to work with some architects. The first thing everyone did when they arrived at work was go to the espresso machine :).

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