Sign in to follow this  
tchaikovsgay

Delete

Recommended Posts

I have learned and tried all three (3) scale systems to some extent or another.

My last two teachers (from years and years ago) both preferred Galamian.  So....I only use Galamian now.  

Here are some takeaways from my daily routine lately.  Keep in mind, I am not a professional, semi-professional, or anything close.  I do teach young children and play in a few groups regularly.

I practice scales every day.  But I do not practice them in a consistent routine like playing all 12 major keys non-stop.  The way I do them...

1.  Every other day, I play all 12 major keys non-stop.  

2.  I routinely have one major concerto that I am always trying to polish up.  So, on alternate days, I practice scales in the key of that piece.  I do 2 octaves, 3 octaves, and 4 when the piece requires it.  I also do octaved scales and tenths.  Then I like to do arpeggios.  

3.  On days that I am not practicing a concerto, I practice short pieces.  Those days are the ones that I am just playing through three octave scales.  

The problem that I am having is that I tend to prefer D-major concertos...lol.  

With so much more time on my hands lately, I find myself practicing a lot more.  I also see myself practicing haphazardly.  So I say to you, the OP, just make sure you have a system and keep it on lock down (no pun intended).  You are a student and this is your thing.  Music is only my outlet and I work in my main profession from home, so I can get away with haphazard practicing.  :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it doesn't matter.  have you thought about the purpose of it?  to me, the main thing you're doing playing them all without stopping is exercising the muscle in your head that gets tired from sustained concentration.  i'd say use vibrato...  also, use the circle of fifths, don't play them alphabetically.  it takes more concentration and is more musicianly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

it doesn't matter.  have you thought about the purpose of it?  to me, the main thing you're doing playing them all without stopping is exercising the muscle in your head that gets tired from sustained concentration.  i'd say use vibrato...  also, use the circle of fifths, don't play them alphabetically.  it takes more concentration and is more musicianly

This is an opportunity to examine the purpose of etudes and scales. As a student, it is more efficient as Mr Merkel states, to keep it relative to 5ths. Given time restraints work on the principle keys every other day. go to the 4+ flats/sharps on the alternate days. 

Just a few suggestions as one runs through these scales.

Bracket the scales in octaves so you know where the scale is centered. This preps you for double stops within the scale.

Bracketing preps you for major/ minor better and future double stops.

Bracket but do not use the 1st finger as the anchor of the bracket

Extend ( add ) the lower 7th degree and the upper 9th to the octave brackets without shifting ( moving the thumb. ) 

When shifting on upper strings, use 1 - 2, 1 - 2 and 1 - 2 -3, 1 - 2 - 3 and 1 - 2 -  3 - 4, 1 - 2 - 3 - 4

Scales on one string - Flesch, etc, using the above fingering.

Learn to play with light touch, but dead accurate.

Add light vibrato with the same intensity on each finger.

 

Bonnie Hampton, among other teachers, used ( uses ) Peterson strobe tuners to tune double stops during lessons. For most students, I do not use tuners because students need to develop listening skills and hear beats as well as the sub-sonic groans that occurs. A third of my students develop close to perfect pitch ( some piano playing really helps ) which makes dictation much easier. Bracketing will allow one to develop a muscular feel of pitch. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any routine you make will only last so long, but it's good to have a routine, and really go at it until you have exhausted its benefits (the routine, not the scales). Then you will make a new routine. If you are excited to play all the scales, in whatever order, go for it. Spend a week with each fingering, or a month. None of the authors of those scale books would tell you to only do their fingering, they would just give you the reason they chose it at that time.

You will one day tire of the routine, and you will develop a new one. That's good. Whether it's scales, or bodybuilding, or playing baseball, you have to shake things up once in a while, or you get stuck in a rut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.