PhilipKT

What’s your “project in the closet?”

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 Everybody has a project or two they will get around to when they have a chance, something fun or challenging or possibly- but not probably-lucrative, or whatever. My friend who recently closed his shop now has about 100 bows to restore, and time to do it; another Violin shop owner has been working on a cello in his free time, for a long time, and now he can work on it full-time. Today I am sitting down to work on my book( but must fold laundry and make bed first, or the boss will frown.)

What’s your project in the closet?

The Violin/Viola/Cello You’ve been waiting to work on, but never had time. I would love to see pictures and progress if anyone cares to share.

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Haven't had time to work on any of my 'closet' projects (since I'm still working)...but am plugging along (a bit faster since I now have my commute time to myself!) with all the other things I would like to get done, like the tortoise bungalow - which I'm painting in bits and pieces...

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Das boot.

Picture this if you will;

Imagine a large megaphone like cone or perhaps a Tuba bell, made from wooden strips attached to an inner rings structure. When placed on the floor,like a lampshade, the cone top would be at about waist high, 3 feet or so.

Then imagine a guitar seamlessly integrated into the top of the cone,properly centered so it stands free with out tipping over, then on the side of the cone a pluck-able open string harp is built into the side of the cone, with an adjustable slide to act as a capo for alternate tunings, AND then maybe on top of all that, the cone will have floor pedals built in that allows one to open ports to change the projection as well as a "paddle pedal" that will allow for an internal paddle to rotate,{like a marimba} thus causing a rotary effect when the ports are opened up, as well as the ability to tilt it back and open the cone at the bottom.

One of these days if the virus or something else doesn't get me.

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A 5-string fiddle, or possibly 5-string viola.  If I ever get past the waiting list for regular stuff.

Experiment:  aluminum bass bar.  It should work exactly the same as a spruce one, if sized properly for stiffness and weight.

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42 minutes ago, Don Noon said:

A 5-string fiddle, or possibly 5-string viola.  If I ever get past the waiting list for regular stuff.

Experiment:  aluminum bass bar.  It should work exactly the same as a spruce one, if sized properly for stiffness and weight.

Fascinating question. Will you tune the bar first? And if so, how will you tune it?

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19 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Wow! Are you making enough for everyone?.

Everyone at Joe Thrift's summer workshop...or just for me if it gets canceled. :unsure:

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5 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Fascinating question. Will you tune the bar first? And if so, how will you tune it?

By knowing the material properties (which I do), I can scale the dimensions to match the mass and stiffness distribution of a spruce bar, and I think that's about all that matters.  An aluminum bar should be about the same profile as normal, but only 1mm wide or less.  Gluing to the plate might be an issue. Damping might matter a little bit, but I'll bet not much for the bar itself.  "Tuning" with taptones for a bass bar I think is pointless or even counterproductive.

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6 hours ago, Don Noon said:

Experiment:  aluminum bass bar.  It should work exactly the same as a spruce one, if sized properly for stiffness and weight.

But why, Don? ;)

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1 hour ago, Don Noon said:

An aluminum bar should be about the same profile as normal, but only 1mm wide or less.  Gluing to the plate might be an issue. 

Have you thought of keeping the footprint and general profile similar to a standard bar, and creating an aluminum bar to match, but making a sort of trussed structure or lattice of some sort? That could keep the weight down and, if designed right, could still mimic the stiffness properties, without sacrificing gluing footprint. 

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20 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

...about 100 bows to restore, and time to do it...

That describes my situation, too.  After a busy few months I have just about finished the work that I have to do for customers, so now I have time to fix up some bows from the box of bows that aren't work fixing.  It turns out that most of them can be fixed up if I spend enough time on them.  I have mounted several with butt cracks in the lathe, drilled out the butts, glued in pernambuco dowels, turned new nipples and drilled new screw holes.  For years I've been meaning to practice doing this on cheap bows to become more familiar with the procedure.  I also have a nice stick or two that I want to make frogs and buttons for.  And several dozen violins needing repairs and set-ups.  I have plenty to keep me occupied.

But I wonder if there will be a market for bows in the new economic landscape that I anticipate.

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@Brad Dorsey

I posted recently about a bow that was supposed to be thrown away. I found a Lothar Seifert cello stick in the pile of stuff Jay told me to haul off. I made arrangements to buy it and asked him to deliver it to a mutual friend. He delivered the wrong bow to my friend. It was an Albert Schubert bow, With odd lapping(I posted pictures, and there was a lively chat.)When I mentioned it to Jay and told him that he’d given me the wrong bow, he laughed and said he didn’t understand why I’d wanted it because he, “...didn’t think much of it.” He told me to keep it. I had it re-haired for $75, and it turned out to be a fantastic bow! Easily the equal of a basic Arcos Brazil bow. I was delighted to save such a worthwhile bow, and happy to pass it along to one of my young students to be her first real bow, at the cost of $75.

I love saving worthwhile stuff. Another rescued cello stick was fitted with a factory frog and also turned out to be a worthwhile bow, passed on at cost to another student. A rescued violin stick, also fitted with a new frog, got positive reviews, and is with a colleague at the moment.

I can’t wait to hear your own stories of saving stuff from the dustbin. Pictures would be great too.

Edited by PhilipKT

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27 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

But I wonder if there will be a market for bows in the new economic landscape that I anticipate.

Yes.

Every generation, given the opportunity, discovers for itself the inherent value of the things that we discuss here on this site.

The little girl who now owns the Shubert bow is 14. The little boy who bought the rescue cello bow is 13. Neither of them wanted a carbon fiber bow.

Eventually they will both improve to the point where they want better equipment, And when they do, there will be more children who are interested in that quality.

That will always be true, So be of good cheer, and keep me in mind when you have some cello bows.

I love playing bows almost as much as I love saving them in the first place.

:-)

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2 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

But why, Don? ;)

Because it's weird, but should work.

1 hour ago, Nick Allen said:

Have you thought of keeping the footprint and general profile similar to a standard bar, and creating an aluminum bar to match, but making a sort of trussed structure or lattice of some sort? That could keep the weight down and, if designed right, could still mimic the stiffness properties, without sacrificing gluing footprint. 

This would be one of my 1-day experiments, not an interplanetary spacecraft.  So, no... I didn't think of doing that.

 

 

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Six student violins hanging, all needing work, one orphan and very tired eighteenth century German violin, one DESTROYED student cello and one forlorn Baroque cello on the bench. Oh, and several new form mold patterns I wish to get cut out this week. But seriously, you're going to inquire of an ex-government Psych doctor: "What's your project in the closet?" Well, let me tell you about my childhood...

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22 minutes ago, Fossil Ledges said:

Six student violins hanging, all needing work, one orphan and very tired eighteenth century German violin, one DESTROYED student cello and one forlorn Baroque cello on the bench. Oh, and several new form mold patterns I wish to get cut out this week. But seriously, you're going to inquire of an ex-government Psych doctor: "What's your project in the closet?" Well, let me tell you about my childhood...

Laff Laff.

One of my friends is also a government psychologist in Alabama, and she also plays cello, so I laughed extra hard when I read your comment.

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Oddly enough, not that I am working from home I find I have even LESS time to work on instruments. But I have some projects...

First of all, I am not a luthier nor even a qualified amateur. So my first project is to make a sound post for one old fiddle, new sound post and bridge for three other old fiddles, then fix the cracks in the top of a strange old VSO. 

If I can manage all that without causing irrepairable damage, I might start on a bigger project - making a "tenore" after the Stainer poster...

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10 hours ago, baroquecello said:

Variations for cello quartet on the german Christmas song "Maria durch ein Dornwald ging". 

I’d love to see the music if if you have it to share, And I will be happy to share some of the obscure stuff that I have if you will give me your email address

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18 hours ago, Don Noon said:

Gluing to the plate might be an issue.

You might want to look into using very thick shellac.  It sticks to wood and metal and is used in player piano actions where metal vacuum tubes need to be attached into wood and sealed air tight.

Dale

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A white cello I have owned for years. Recently it received a good bass bar and some regraguation.   It has the WILDEST poplar back.  Hopefully I'll get to the white work soon....then off to Varnish Land.

on we go,

Joe

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On 4/3/2020 at 2:52 PM, Dale Vanderlaan said:

You might want to look into using very thick shellac.  It sticks to wood and metal and is used in player piano actions where metal vacuum tubes need to be attached into wood and sealed air tight.

Dale

I can think of better adhesives, not excluding hot hide glue.

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