Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Does Phillip's new cello exhibit antiquing or natural wear?


Rue
 Share

Does Phillip's new cello exhibit antiquing or natural wear?  

23 members have voted

  1. 1. Does Phillip's new cello exhibit antiquing or natural wear?

    • Antiquing
      2
    • Natural wear
      21


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, duane88 said:

I would like to see pictures of the entire cello. I have owned and sold many Morellis, and all of them have distressed varnish with grafted necks and bushed when new peg holes.

Yes, this has a grafted neck and bushed peg holes, I am home for dinner, but I will offer plentiful photographs when I return.

Edited by PhilipKT
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, duane88 said:

I would like to see pictures of the entire cello. I have owned and sold many Morellis, and all of them have distressed varnish with grafted necks and bushed when new peg holes.

How did you like them?

I have owned three or four violins, and liked them all. I remember buying one in Boston at Skinners, around the turn of the century. I was with my Violin dealer friend, and we were invited to one of the hotel rooms Where the real dealing action was. I was content to listen to everybody talking about this or that, and my friend suddenly showed me a lovely red Morelli Violin body. Just the violin, no set up at all, and he told me to buy it because the price was really low and it was a beautiful example. So I did, and it ended up sounding and looking beautiful, so much so that I ended up playing it myself For a while before we sold it.

I bought my Robert Shallock bow in the same room, And I wish that I still had it.

Edited by PhilipKT
Addendum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The wear is not where normal wear would be. So I vote for “artificial”

The wear in fourth position Is supposed to simulate normal wear, so the place is right but the wear itself is obviously original to the cello.

And a picture of the bottom rib because those saddle notches are a bit overdone.

It was also made with center cleats, which is interesting.

616D8DAF-FA1F-411A-8ED8-8FE5405FC1D2.jpeg

1D158253-A145-4BA3-9591-8E9734116D01.jpeg

95D5E67F-8F36-4C2C-90BD-370C4AD9F5C8.jpeg

6CBAC1D1-6B7C-4E79-9E7F-24765910513D.jpeg

0F2213BF-793D-45BE-A66A-DFC25B6FA757.jpeg

EA274BCC-BE13-4FBE-AFFC-5FCDB113DDA2.jpeg

Edited by PhilipKT
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, excellent sleuthing points! But I am always interested in the psychology of why, what is/are the motivation(s). I have two battered cellos on the bench with legitimate wear, and they just make me tired. This instrument, however is getting more interesting. What would be the point of those saddle notches? I don't get it, just straight up butchery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Fossil Ledges said:

Yes, excellent sleuthing points! But I am always interested in the psychology of why, what is/are the motivation(s). I have two battered cellos on the bench with legitimate wear, and they just make me tired. This instrument, however is getting more interesting. What would be the point of those saddle notches? I don't get it, just straight up butchery.

 I think the pegbox work is just to simulate age, as far as the saddle notches, I have no idea, but maybe it’s just an indication of factory work? They wanted to make sure they avoided saddle cracks? The apprentice on his first day was given the job? The guy was watching baseball on TV while he cut the notches?

I strongly feel that real antiquing will happen soon enough. My own cello is only 15 years old, and although it is totally crack-free, it has two annoying dents, some varnish wear on the edge, and a bit of chest wear on the back. Good honest proof of good honest work, even though I wipe it down frequently.

It’s like cleaning a black powder rifle:”even with the best cleaning, a black powder firearm will eventually show slow and subtle wear...with slapdash cleaning, the wear will be neither slow nor subtle.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Violadamore said:

An open cart, and a stable where the horses could lick it?  :lol:

Probably just a canvas 'cello bag (In an open cart, and a stable where the horses could lick it)  :) 

As I said, we don't know.  Could just have been a bad case that let the bow slap the instrument continually, or the previous owner could just have been a careless slob.  

Anyway, I'd be tempted to leave it alone at this point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am always grateful for the good old canvas cello bag. After my students drag their cellos up and down flights of stairs and through the cobblestones, the cello bag usually does a good job of containing all the splinters and fragments. Then they bring the bag of chips chips to me and ask that it be all glued back together in the shape of a cello.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I took my cello to J to get the edge fixed, and he fixed the edge, switched the tailpiece, moved the sound post, the cello sounds great.

 I asked him, “oh by the way. Tell me about the spot here. Is that antiquing or is that damage? Lots of people are interested in knowing.“

 He looked at the spot and said, “oh, I think that is just oxidation of the varnish. It’s no big deal.“

So there you have it folks. If Jay is correct, it means that everybody was wrong!

Edited by PhilipKT
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...